Author Topic: The United Kingdom  (Read 6999 times)

Offline Patriot:Ex Machina

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The United Kingdom
« on: October 27, 2008, 10:15:47 AM »
I know we have some UK members here.
Let's hear from you!

Offline JetstreamJonny

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Re: The United Kingdom
« Reply #1 on: October 31, 2008, 09:33:16 AM »
JetstreamJonny is here!
I'm in Suffolk - any other UK survivors out there or will I have the entire British Isles to myself when TSHTF!?
Cheers - Jon

mac

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Re: The United Kingdom
« Reply #2 on: November 01, 2008, 02:30:07 PM »
Hi Jon,

I'm from wiltshire what do you think of the podcast?

Mac

Offline JetstreamJonny

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Re: The United Kingdom
« Reply #3 on: November 03, 2008, 03:26:48 AM »
Hi Mac, I've been listening for a couple of months and have now caught up with all the back issues of the podcast. I listen generally while I'm driving to work and it's like having a mate sitting in the passenger seat ranting while you just listen and Mmmmm & Aaaah every now and then!!
To answer your question I love the show, it confirms and clarifies a lot of what I've been thinking anyway and has helped to focus my thoughts and spurred me into some actual action. I have stopped thinking about it and started doing something. Although the podcast is naturally Amerocentric (is that real word? It is now) pretty much everything Jack talks about also applies here and I think an increasing number of people are thinking the same way - I looked at getting a wood burning stove this weekend and a large number of suppliers have sold out completely!
I think that people just intuitively know, even if they don't know why, that it's time to start thinking differently.
I've also started to think about various scenarios, have you noticed that all the big supermarkets have a "just in time" delivery policy? In my local Tesco they start to run out of basics like rice, pasta, bread, milk etc by about 7pm. If something disrupted the supply chain, weather, fuel shortage, martial law, the shops would run out of food within 2 days. I hadn't really given that sort of thing any thought before.
Time to stop, I'm starting to sound like Jack.
Nice to hear from you.
Jon

mac

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Re: The United Kingdom
« Reply #4 on: November 04, 2008, 05:38:21 AM »
Hi Jon,

I've only been listening for a couple of weeks. I like his more simple approaches to things, for example the idea of having a months supply of food, old stuff at the front new stuff at the back and keep cycling it.
I did see last week on BBC news 24 that the sales of wood burners have gone up by 70% it's got to be the way to go, it's not just sustainable but also sitting in front of a fire is very therapeutic, primal.
I grow a lot of my own veg in my garden and and worry that one day if things go wrong a bunch of chavs will just take it all! and I don't know how i'd deal with that.
My friend had all his pumpkins stolen from his allotment this week.

cheers

Offline JetstreamJonny

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Re: The United Kingdom
« Reply #5 on: November 05, 2008, 09:00:34 AM »
Yep, I know what you mean Mac, I grow veg in my garden too. Luckily It's fairly secluded but the thought had occurred to me too. It would be next to impossible to safeguard an allotment. I suppose the answer is to start looking towards getting out of town where the Chavs are less likely to come looking. And I guess it makes it all the more sensible to start stashing a few weeks food in a safe place (or places) and not tell anyone about it. I have identified a place I can go to if things really kick off and we have to leave the house, it's out of town, reasonably secure and a good bolt hole at least to lie low for a little while if need be. I haven't done so yet but I will be starting to build a small food and equipment cache there over the next few months. I agree with you about Jacks sensible attitude to prepping, it's easy to go off the deep end and get a bit paranoid! I just intend to do a little bit each month, I've allocated a few quid each month to buying supplies and equipment and soon enough we'll have what we need. I already feel much happier for having done the little that I have.
And you're right - there is something very nurturing about a fire beyond the heat it gives.
Cheers - Jon

mac

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Re: The United Kingdom
« Reply #6 on: November 07, 2008, 01:34:56 PM »
Hi Jon,

I've just listened to Jacks podcast on 9 methods for storing food. I don't think he mentioned clamping, have you tried it? If not, all you need is a box (wooden or metal) part fill it with sand put root veg in there put more sand on top and keep layering up. My beetroots are still as good as the day i picked them 5 months ago, they don't last a week in the fridge!!

Have you seen any good programs on tv based on survival skills etc? I watched a program called "it's not easy being green" which had loads of great ideas for self sufficient living.

Cheers
Mac

Offline DeltaEchoVictor

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Re: The United Kingdom
« Reply #7 on: November 12, 2008, 08:11:39 PM »
Hey Mac,

I've heard of using sawdust for storing root vegetables but not sand.  Do different root veggies require different methods for long term storage, or will sand work for any type of root veggie?  I ask because sand would be much easier to aquire in quantity where I am (Missouri in the US).  Can you store potatoes & onions this way in particular?

Thanks,
Shane

mac

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Re: The United Kingdom
« Reply #8 on: November 13, 2008, 02:52:03 AM »
Hi Shane,

I've always stored Beetroots and carrots in sand not sure about onions. My father in law stores potatoes in sand as well. Clamping in sand seems almost to defy the laws of science in that some veg will store longer than i imagined possible!

If you want to store onions longer have you tried growing Sturon Onions i've found this variety outlast many others. If you want to save seed try shallotts, if you don't know much about them and want to know more let me know!

I think my advice is give it a go with a couple of onions, get a small wooden metal box and sand and sit back and wait!

I found this online, not sure about the bit where it states "Clamps are probably not the best method for storing the smaller amounts", as i only store 15 beetroots & 30 carrots per year. The below method is slightly different to mine as i just have a metal box filled with layers of sand and veg stored in a cool, dark place.


"Storing Root Vegetable Crops in a Clamp
In the days when people had large families and often survived by what they grew it was common to store root crops such as potatoes, carrots, Swedes, beetroot and celeriac in clamps. Clamps are probably not the best method for storing the smaller amounts required by a small family or couple.

The first thing to ensure is that the crop will be kept out of standing water. Choose a dry spot in the plot and then dig a trench around the storage area. This will help drain any water and provides soil you will need later.

Next place a layer of straw, bracken or even shredded paper on the ground and then place a layer of your crop down. With carrots, you could try a circular pattern, thick end to the outside, then place another layer of your packing material or sand to level up. Carry on adding layers to form a cone shape. On the outside of the clamp, place six to eight inches of straw and make a little straw spike at the top. This will allow excess moisture to escape,

The soil you removed from your drainage trench can then be used to cover the clamp."

Cheers
Mac

Offline DeltaEchoVictor

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Re: The United Kingdom
« Reply #9 on: November 13, 2008, 02:58:38 AM »
Thanks very much Mac.

No I don't know much about the various types of onions.  The root vegetables are not something I've spent much time trying to grow.  Where I live we only have a few inches of top soil so anything grown that has an edible root has to be in a raised bed, mound etc.  I'm going to design & implement some raised beds for my garden over the next couple of years & I'd like to give some of the root vegetables a try.  Guess I'm studying for the future, that's why I ask.

Thanks again for your time.

Shane

Offline stevebluff

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Re: The United Kingdom
« Reply #10 on: January 11, 2009, 05:51:19 PM »
Hi, Steve here.  I live on the Hants/Wilts border.

I noticed someone from wilts earlier.

Hello to all UK preppers!

BR

Steve

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Re: The United Kingdom
« Reply #11 on: January 19, 2009, 06:08:13 AM »
Hi guys just thought i would add another guy to the mix, im 19 and in the west midlands.

ive been listening since day one.

Luke.

Offline stevebluff

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Re: The United Kingdom
« Reply #12 on: January 19, 2009, 03:19:36 PM »
hi luke, i wonder how many uk listeners we have.

Wonder if jack knows??

br

steve

Offline Rosesandtea

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Re: The United Kingdom
« Reply #13 on: February 05, 2009, 05:21:14 PM »
I'm American, but my husband is English.  We live in south Oxfordshire.

Prior to y2k I stored a lot of water,which was very strange to those who knew about it,  funny thing was that one day in '98 I think, the water to our road was off with no explanation and I was so pleased that I didn't have to worry about water or even bother trying to figure out how to work the mobile water tank they just dumped with no instructions on the green up the road.  The outage didn't last long, but was instructive to me.

Unfortunately, as we are trying to move house, we are reducing as much as possible but I do think I want to keep up at least some water.

My b'day is coming up and I think I would like an airgun as my pressie from dh - seems like a good way to begin  - anyway do any of y'all know of a good place to get one at a reasonable distance from my area?  Also recommendations for type that would suit me, who is a newbie, and not very strong especially in arms  (i.e. the arms that attach to own's torso!).   

I am hoping to be able to use the range that is in our town, if I can get the secretary to contact me back!   

Hoping none of you are too badly affected by the global warming we are having - we had a few inches today and the kids enjoyed it.

Offline stevebluff

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Re: The United Kingdom
« Reply #14 on: February 07, 2009, 03:50:53 PM »
Hi, how did the snow affect you all?  I made it into work Monday and Tuesday (took my land cruiser though rather than the saloon).

Offline Rosesandtea

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Re: The United Kingdom
« Reply #15 on: February 09, 2009, 03:28:01 PM »
Hi, how did the snow affect you all?  I made it into work Monday and Tuesday (took my land cruiser though rather than the saloon).

David was in Brazil all week so he made it to work just fine!   He made it out before the snows hit and Heathrow was open when he got back this last Sat.  He came home in the middle of the afternoon so he was fine on our road.

We didn't make it to chuch on Sunday, though, as our road refreezes in the dark and doesn't thaw until it's been daylight for quite a while.
He stayed home today to get some things done.  We'll see what happens tomorrow morning. 

My chickens hate all the white stuff.

Ummm, not to nag or anything, but does anyone have any airgun recommendations?   

Offline JetstreamJonny

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Re: The United Kingdom
« Reply #16 on: February 23, 2009, 03:35:16 AM »
Hi there Rosesandtea,
I've been looking into airguns myself lately. I've come to the conclusion that to own a firearm (ie a .22 rifle) is just too arduous a talk in this country. Hunting power air rifles are much less hassle. I'm sure you've researched this yourself but you can own an airgun with a power of 12 ft lbs maximum before it requires a firearms certificate. A gun of this power is  quite sufficient to shoot small game like rabbits. There are a lot of cheap far eastern made guns available, some below the £100 mark but you get what you pay for. The best gun I've seen so far (and saving the money to buy one) is the Air Arms TX200. Really well made but heavy as a result. They sell for around £350 but I've seen them with scopes second hand for around £250. Weihrauch enjoy an excellent reputation as do the good old British small arms (BSA) - BSA Lightning seem to be the one to go for in my opinion.
If you're interested, it's my opinion that as a prepper it's best to go for a spring rifle rather than a precharge. If it all goes belly-up there's going to be nowhere to recharge your bottle. With a springer you always have the power in your elbow!
I've also discussed the pros & cons of fixed barrel (underlever action) and break-barrel actions but in well made modern guns there seem  to be little between them.
Hope that's of some use to you - fire in the questions as it's a good way of driving research into the subject.
Cheers - Jonathan (in Suffolk)

Offline JetstreamJonny

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Re: The United Kingdom
« Reply #17 on: February 23, 2009, 03:48:47 AM »
Hi all, just wanted to say hello to Luke & Steve too - welcome!
It's brilliant to see a bit of activity growing in the UK. We have a rather different political and legal situation here which I feel makes our approach slightly different. So it will be great to get some discussion going here. The big difference of course is the issue of gun ownership.
I've been listening pretty much since day one - I love it. I've not been active on the forum for a while though, been rather busy with work.
I'm starting to squirrel away a few supplies and am slowly putting together bug out bags for all my family (5 of us).
The recent snow has really made me think about equipping vehicles with permanent kits for all kinds of emergencies. When you give it some thought, getting stuck in a vehicle comes down to making the same decision as you would at home - Bug-in or Bug-out, stay or go. In either case you're going to need to be prepared. For example, I realised that I drive to work wearing clothes that would not be suitable for walking anydistance in bad weather - and I like to think that I'm a prepper !!!
I'd be interested to hear what preps you lot are all doing.
I've started to learn to shoot a bow recently too - are any of you archers?
Cheers - Jon

Offline Rosesandtea

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Re: The United Kingdom
« Reply #18 on: February 23, 2009, 07:21:11 AM »
Hey Jonathan,
thanks for your post/answer.   I can see your point about the spring powered airguns.  It really is an excellent point.

My problem is that they are also so much more expensive!!  I was hesitant to ask dh for one around the £100 mark and those are pcps. 

Well, he's listening to the podcasts now so maybe he will "spring" for one at some point!

~Karen

Offline JetstreamJonny

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Re: The United Kingdom
« Reply #19 on: February 23, 2009, 07:34:59 AM »
Hi Karen - it's all very well to go for the best kit but budget is important too! If you Google it you can easily get an air rifle for under £100 but if I were you I'd avoid paying much less. If you want to actually be able to kill anything with it then go for something in the region of 11.5 ft lbs - if you just want to give it a go and shoot tin cans in your garden then you can easily go cheap and just have fun.
You can't buy airguns by post, they have to be bought through a dealer so I'd do a search to see who's near you and go & talk to them about it. In this current climate it wouldn't suprise me if there are some good second hand bargains to be had.

Happy shooting - Jon

Offline Rosesandtea

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Re: The United Kingdom
« Reply #20 on: February 23, 2009, 07:37:09 AM »
The recent snow has really made me think about equipping vehicles with permanent kits for all kinds of emergencies. When you give it some thought, getting stuck in a vehicle comes down to making the same decision as you would at home - Bug-in or Bug-out, stay or go. In either case you're going to need to be prepared. For example, I realised that I drive to work wearing clothes that would not be suitable for walking anydistance in bad weather - and I like to think that I'm a prepper !!!
I'd be interested to hear what preps you lot are all doing.
I've started to learn to shoot a bow recently too - are any of you archers?
Cheers - Jon

Wanted to comment on this too.  I used to be so much more careful than I am now - dh is not much of a "be prepared" guy (though he was in scouting) and I've kind of lost my caution.   In the winter I used to make sure we had a blanket in the car, and if we were going to church or something I would make sure we put shoes in the car that we could walk in, and make sure everyone had suitable coats for more than just a dash from car to venue.  I'd often stick in a bag of hats and mittens "just in case".   I was thinking more in the line of what if the car breaks down and we have to walk somewhere, or even just sit in the car waiting for help and not be able to run the car for heat.

We have 5 children - so that means quite a lot of hats and mittens, shoes ,etc and I've just gotten away from being prepared for car trips as much as I used to but I need to start doing it again.

One cheap option for blankets - for car or home, is simply getting appropriate lengths of fleece fabric from the fabric store.    I don't even hem them but you could do that, it makes them look prettier, but the fleece doesn't ravel so it's not necessary.    I would get 2 1/2 mtrs for my son who's 6'5" I think and so on.  Make it longer than the person is by at least 18 inches so it can be tucked in around them adequately.   My kids love getting them for Christmas.     They aren't hugely bulky and are lightweight.  Easily washed and dry quickly.  Good for camping, dragging around the house, taking in the car, and if you have little children it's not a disaster if there is some kind of "accident."  I think as long as you have water they are easily washed.  

Offline Rosesandtea

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Re: The United Kingdom
« Reply #21 on: February 23, 2009, 07:40:00 AM »
Hi Karen - it's all very well to go for the best kit but budget is important too! If you Google it you can easily get an air rifle for under £100 but if I were you I'd avoid paying much less. If you want to actually be able to kill anything with it then go for something in the region of 11.5 ft lbs - if you just want to give it a go and shoot tin cans in your garden then you can easily go cheap and just have fun.
You can't buy airguns by post, they have to be bought through a dealer so I'd do a search to see who's near you and go & talk to them about it. In this current climate it wouldn't suprise me if there are some good second hand bargains to be had.

Happy shooting - Jon

I never thought about the dealer possibly having second hand guns.  I wish we were up in Yorkshire (well, at least to buy guns at) - that county seems to have loads of licensed dealers!!  Hardly any where we are, so we'll have to do a bit of driving.

Anyway, thanks for the good idea.

TomGood

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Re: The United Kingdom
« Reply #22 on: March 10, 2009, 03:34:49 PM »
greetings fella uk inhabitants..

first time posting, and interesting reading the topics..

have to say that im coming more from a self sufficiency vibe rather than a hardcore prepper (hence the good life handle  ;D) but of course that's not to say that im blind to the ways of the world and arent a little bit prepared. luckily they equipment and skill from my gardening and outdoor activities cross over with being prepared.

my only real change has to be an increase in food stocks but the way that the food prices are going up that's just plain sensible..

anyhows enough ramblings.. it seems to me that the as pointed out the major worries that alot on this board seem to share is that unlike our American cousins we dont seem to be trusted with firearms or other less lethal means of self defense.. whilst every one seems to think that air rifles seem to be the way forward (which im sure will be good for hunting rabbits and other little criters of which is all there's left wild) may i suggest that you give a thought towards archery and crossbows...

now the first point is that there is a proud heritage of archery in england (think longbows, robin hood etc etc) and so there are plenty of clubs and such where you can learn safely and practice without any concern from nosy neighbors or being in trouble with the law. whilst there is a skill with archery its quite easily picked up and has the added benefit for all those prepping for a poop hitting the fan event of not relying on pesky to obtain ammo/pellets or co2 gas..

now for those that dont wish to dedicate weekends to archery there is also the crossbow route, designed specifically for the unskilled peasant these are much easier to to learn and dont be fooled into thinking you need to get a super strong one. do some quick research and you can get a simple small recursive 150ibl crossbow that will be both a great intimidation weapon( for you shtf peeps) and also should suffice to hunting anything still in the British isles.. this combined with draw aids if your especially concerned with strength will allow anyone to be equipped..

just a note on safety however.. these are not toys!!! never ever ever point one of these at anyone!!! and i strongly suggest joing a club just to learn the safety procedure so you and others are safe!!... these are intended to kill and can do very serious damage!! even in some mad total world collapsing poop hitting the fan scenario that some people are worried about i would still say never point it directly at anyone!!
just think about it folks, ignoring the obvious tendency for people to overreact and to miss judge a minor disruption as a major event (think about trying to live with repercussions if it all came good again two weeks later) in a major event youd had the added trouble/dilemma of dealing with an aggressor still very much alive but now with your arrow/crossbow sticking out of them!!! not a pleasant scenario to deal with or live with!!!

so enough ramblings for my first post..
 
peace out




Offline Rosesandtea

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Re: The United Kingdom
« Reply #23 on: March 10, 2009, 04:26:35 PM »
Hi Tom,
(humming TGL theme tune) welcome to the boards.

Your thoughts on bows reflect those of some people on another forum I'm on. 

TomGood

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Re: The United Kingdom
« Reply #24 on: March 11, 2009, 02:56:59 PM »
Hi Rosesandtea

thanks for the welcome.

have been keeping upto date with the recent world economical news and am wondering how long people think the ££ will be worth anything?? (see below)

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/business/news/run-on-uk-sees-foreign-investors-pull-1-trillion-out-of-the-city-1639413.html



what im wondering is what are uk preppers thoughts on our most likely scenario?? and what are the sort of incident do they have in mind when making prepping decisions??

whilst i honestly think that the much heralded 'british blitz spirit' does have some basis in reality (just see the understated British reaction to the london attacks and the recent floods) ruling out imo sudden mass break down in society and general rioting/looting etc.., we do seem to face some major potential challenges not present elsewhere in America/Canada etc..

for starters im sure that we as a nation import something like 40% of the food eaten in the country.. we have a really messed up service based economy and have imo been batting out of our league economy wise for awhile now, we have the largest national and consumer debt in europe and now the government has started to print money as well . (brilliant idea as thats always worked well in the past!!!) 

we don't suffer natural disasters, have a mild climate  and i cant buy into the whole tin foil hat concepts of black helicopters and NWO and such , so with the exception of the impending overdue flu pandemic i just cant see a sudden shtf scenario, more likely imo is a slow and gradual decline of the society and stability due to economic factors or a global event such as climate change/ peak oil etc etc..


on a side note i would like to recommend the the following book as kind of the British version of 'patriots'


http://www.amazon.co.uk/Retrieved-Future-John-Seymour/dp/1872410057

written by the John Seymour so its heavily farming/gardening based!! but be warned there is a heavy slice of tin foil hat'ness to some later chapters.... still not too bad a book. also check out his self sufficiency and gardening non fiction books , there actually rather good.


peace out


 



 



Offline Rosesandtea

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Re: The United Kingdom
« Reply #25 on: March 12, 2009, 12:26:29 PM »
Tom, thanks for the book recommendation.  I'll have a look into it.

I think there is something in what you say about the British and orderliness/calm/whatever (I'm speaking as an American who has lived here for 19 years).   I think in many places things will get very tough financially but people will hang together.    However, I think in cities the situation could be much worse.  Oddly, some villages in very rural areas could have some nasty episodes as well - just last night I heard about a village where a huge percentage is on drugs - not just kids either.  In those communities I think the problem will be thefts, violence during thievery, and the violence committed in defense against thievery/violence.  In cities I think the lack of community spirit - lost in the quest for "tolerance" and encouraging people to keep their own culture instead of being part of the community (whilst keeping other ethnic stuff at home and religious centers) is going to cause problems.   At least more than in the rural towns.

Best served will be those communities where there is a good mix of old, middle and young people, instead of just one type if you follow me. 

I think some bad climate things can occur - although unusual .    Flooding is not unusual though and will be a problem if the finances hit bottom and we have another summer of '07. 

My concerns are how people will cope if the electricity goes off for any length of time and especially if the gas goes off.   Plus food.   

My most likely scenario is a big financial crisis, depression, and some health disaster which affects humans or animals (thus reducing the food supply).   



Offline EnglishBrambles

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Re: The United Kingdom
« Reply #26 on: March 26, 2009, 03:14:27 PM »
Hey, Ethan down in South Hampshire.
I've been listening since Christmas, great to find some like minded people.
Have started prepping and have got the wife on board too.

Offline Rosesandtea

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Re: The United Kingdom
« Reply #27 on: March 26, 2009, 03:29:38 PM »
Hi Ethan, nice to "meet" you!

Offline JetstreamJonny

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Re: The United Kingdom
« Reply #28 on: April 03, 2009, 07:53:17 AM »
Hi everyone, nice to see the UK group growing.
I'm very pleased to say that I bought myself a lovely Air Arms rifle at the weekend! (Did you look ito that any further rosesandtea?) I'm very impressed with the accuracy and power, a very far cry from my old BSA Meteor. I'm still zeroing it in and experimenting with different pellets and different ranges. I think that you have to be very confident of your ability to cleanly kill an animal before you have any right to go shooting at it.
As an interesting aside, and this is the same for everything we talk about in homesteading and survivalism, you can only learn these things by doing them today. If and when that big event comes along and we have to live on our wits and our supplies we need to have these skills in place. It's too late to learn when it's already happened!
This is kind of obvious but have any of you actually tried to get close enough to a rabbit to shoot it with an air rifle - even a powerful one? That's about 40 yards for most practical purposes. It isn't easy, I've just started to try it myself - it takes practice and fieldcraft, something I'm intent on learning. Any advice gratefully received!
Tomgoods comment on archery is a good one too but it illustrates the point even better. If you're going to kill something like a deer with a bow, even at 30 yards, you need to be able to consistently shoot arrows in a 4" grouping from that distance and as TomGood rightly points out - that takes a lot of practice! (I've never managed to get this close to wild deer yet)

I'm practicing archery too by the way, are any of the rest of you archers? I'm making life harder for myself by learning to shoot instinctively with a re-curve. To be able to kill game with it, it will take a lot more tracking, stalking and shooting practice.
By the way, does anyone know where to buy broadhead arrows in the UK - and are they legal? I know it's illegal to shoot game with a bow in the UK but I subscribe to the idea that you should practice with the kit you're going to use, so I'd like to practice with broadheads.

I totally agree that the really big difference between the US and the UK is the issue of gun ownership, I think it's a perfect time to buy a good second hand air rifle and/or a shotgun.
When it comes to defense I think the crossbow is a pretty good idea too, it has a high intimidation factor. Although I don't want to be alarmist, I saw a TV programme recently following SO19 the Met Police armed response unit - it is staggering how many guns are taken off the streets every month in London alone. There are people in the UK who DO have firearms and they are not the ones who play by Queensbury rules. I highly reccommend the Later day saints "LDS Preparedness Manual" - especially read the section towards the end (P184) where there is an article about the events that went on during and after hurricane Katrina. http://www.green-trust.org/freebooks/Preparedness.pdf   
I'm interested in learning about how to defend a home effectively even without a gun - anyone got any links or ideas - I can't help thinking that the best defence policy is not to be where those kind of people are. That leads me to another thought about the UK and it's over-population, do any of you have any thoughts on bug-out locations in the UK.

I'm pleased to say I've also got some new chickens last week (the last lot became a fox's dinner) and we're looking forward to some fresh eggs in the next 3 or 4 weeks.
Also, got the garden under control and can't wait to start getting the first produce for this year.

Interesting discusion about the main threats in the UK, I think our biggest risk comes from our very dense population and our inadequate infrastructure. If a serious event occurred and people needed to move out I think the roads would be jammed instantly. It's bad enough on a normal evening on the M25, if a lot of people were trying to escape an area like London or Birmingham, it would be instant chaos - and not the place to be.
An associated issue is that (as tomgood also points out) we import a lot of food. The road haulage association figures say that over 25% of road traffic in the UK is food transport. All the big stores now rely on just-in-time delivery. Have you been into a large supermarket around 8pm? All the main staple foods, milk, bread, meat are almost sold out - that's the way they want it.
There are any number of scenarios that could interupt the food supply chain and even more that would cause panic buying. How many people in the UK store any food? I reckon most will be lucky to have a weeks worth. Then what? Do you want to be among the crowds fighting for bread at Tescos? Nah - me neither, but I suppose that's why we're into this website! For me it's a good reason not to live in a city (which I don't).
I remember when I was a kid in the 70's we had scheduled power blackouts and petrol rationing, we kept food, candles and gas stoves constantly at the ready - not many do that these days (present company excepted). If something like that was announced today the shops would be swamped and everything would be gone overnight.  And do you remember the tanker driver's strike in about 1998? These things do happen.
There is limited information about local emergency threats here http://www.cabinetoffice.gov.uk/ukresilience.aspx and there is a link to your local area on the right hand side of the website.

Sorry for the rather rambling post - just wanted to say hi and "yes I agree!" - Oh and yes, the John Seymour books are inspiring.
Cheers all - Jon

TomGood

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Re: The United Kingdom
« Reply #29 on: April 04, 2009, 01:46:35 PM »
Hi JetstreamJonny!

some interesting a good points there!! good to see some more activity here!

may i recommend some interesting books by the author tom brown jr, not sure if i truly believe everything he's written about himself but they are some good reads regarding wilderness and urban survival and some great stuff about the philosophy and spirituality of tracking and hunting! theres a lot to be said for the mentaility raised in these books and the general way of life/ outlook on life of the native Americans and other nomadic/spiritual orientated cultures!

in the spirit of the practice as well as theory raised by Jetstream, may i also suggest that anyone with ideas of ever needing to buging out
try it at least once, by this i mean, a hiking/camping trip is probably the most easiest, fun and least likely to raise eye brows!!!. its a great experience and challenge and will truly give you some experience in what to actual pack (trust me lighter is better) and also what physical state you are in. even though among us that are active and sporting in nature may discover that a strenuous hiking trip carry three days of equipment, water and food is tougher than you think it is. As always safety first but if possible go with experienced personnel and camp it rough, nothing beats humping all you need, avoiding those easy but cramped camp sites and camping wild. learning where to get water and where to settup shelter is a must imho!!!


which brings me to my last rambling point for this post.. something always overlooked in the forums in my opinion is the subject of water!!! never forget how truly vital water is to your survival and how precarious our water supply situtation is.. id ask yourself if something major or minor happen tomorrow and last for only two weeks!! where would i get my and my family water from!!! how would i carry it , clean it and make it safe to use!!  three days is all you have without clean water and believe me you dont want to be drinking polluted dirty water.. exercise and illness, eating and general living consumes water and replacing lost water is vital to be able to use up all that stockpiled food and equipment you have!!!

im interested as to what peeps have done to ensure their supply regardless (assuming you dont all have a bugout location in the sticks with its own well and or spring?)))


peace out
tom