Author Topic: A late-night staggering drunk shuts off a farm's power shed; kills 70k chickens  (Read 169 times)

Offline Oil Lady

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The farmer found the guy (evidently a friend of that farmer's daughter) the next morning passed out on his farm, wearing just underwear, and lying on the ground, in a puddle of his own urine. It was around that moment that the farmer realized the exhaust fans of all three of his industrialized chicken barns were not humming.

The chickens died in about 15 minutes without those exhaust fans venting the toxic fumes of chicken guano out of the barns.

(I was going over a chart about 4 years ago concerning the toxicity levels of farm animal waste. And according to that chart, chicken poop is THE most toxic of them all --even moreso than pig poop.)

http://www.examiner.com/article/70-000-chickens-killed-by-drunk-man-entering-poultry-farm

Quote
70,000 chickens killed by drunk man entering poultry farm

August 29, 2012 -- By Heather Tooley

70,000 chickens were killed when a 21-year-old drunk man wandered onto a poultry farm in Delmar, Maryland and shut off power to three barns housing the birds....

...

... Shelton told police he doesn't remember much about what happened other than he went to the farm after being at a nearby concert. He's not sure how he wound up in the shed where he turned off the electricity to three chicken barns at Allen Farms....




Frankly --aside from the fact that this 21-year-old idiot owes the farmer a good quarter of a million dollars for not just the dead chickens, but also for the gawd-awful cleanup job the farmer now has to contract out-- I can't stand the idea of it being "normal" for these modernized chicken barns to be so damned toxic that a mere 15 minute of shutting off the power will kill 70,000 birds.




Offline Smurf Hunter

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I'd be interested to know what the "normal" loss rate is under those conditions.

Offline libertyzeal

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That's horrific, I need to get my own chicken coop up and running ASAP.

Offline Truik

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Can you see it coming?

"And in other news, the cost of chicken is expected to rise..."

And people will just believe it, sigh, and move on.


Offline Oil Lady

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Truik, I'm afraid prices WILL be going up. But not really due to this one stupid kid in Maryland as mentioned here in the OP. Instead prices will be going up due to the domino effect of the global drought we are in right now.

We have an ongoing, multi-year "sticky-thread" over in the subforum called Food Legislation and News, and in that thread we are (this year) discussing the global drought situation and how food prices are already rising.

The name of that "sticky-thread" is "Food prices increasing, possible shortages (merged topics)"

http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=4771.0

If you don't want to read the whole thread dating back to 2009 (it's 17 pages long at this point), skip ahead to the Summer 2012 section of the thread which begins right here: 

http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=4771.msg400823#msg400823

That part of the thread and onward discusses massive crop losses throughout the USA and much of the Northern Hemisphere. (Europe, Russia, China, North America, Australia, India, and parts of Northern Africa have all been impacted by this global drought. A few key parts of Canada are fairing quite well with excellent harvests, and much of South America and the southern regions of Africa are also doing very well with their harvests. We have had droughts in the past which impacted most of just one continent, but this seems to be the very first time that five continents at once have been impacted so severely by just one drought. We are witnessing an unnprecedented situation here with these crop losses.) Because of the drought, the USA alone has lost about 70% of its entire cereal crop (wheat, oats, barley, and especially corn). This will drive up the price of breakfast cereals, bread, pasta, flour, etc. And then there is the loss of grass from sun-scorched plains where animals can no longer graze. This loss of grass will not drive up the price if grass (hee hee), but it will drive up the price of beef, poultry, and pork. The livestock farmers and ranchers cannot afford to feed their livestock because the price of animal feed has gone up. And even just getting water for the animals to drink is becoming close to impossible in some places where water rationing is in effect. A lot of farmers are selling their cows and chickens and pigs for slaughter right now because for every additional day that passes where that animal is still alive and still eating feed and drinking water, the farmer is now losing money. The business model for balancing out the cost of super-cheap animal feed over the months it takes to fatten an animal up for slaughter is now a broken business model in the face of this price hike in grain.

Resident TSP forum member Cedar has been doing an amazing job in that thread documenting for us all on an almost daily basis the prices of wheat and corn, etc, rising before our eyes. And multiple forum members are contributing stories to tat sticky-thread all the time of other issues impacting food prices. Such as: there has been a die-off of over a million chickens in the USA over the past several months due to power failures which have shut down the exhaust fans of chicken barns. (Part of why I posted this here.) 

The predictions for the upcoming months insofar as meat and poultry prices are as follows:

Farmers and ranchers are having a regretable firesale on chickens, cows, and pigs, selling them as fast as they can to slaughter houses --usually at a loss-- to just get the animals off their hands. This mad rush to sell animals to slaughter will temporarily drive down the price of beef, poultry, and pork. These bargain basement prices are expected to hit the supermarkets around October and allow us all a nice holiday season of cheap prices at the meat department. But then, after January rolls around, that firesale will be over and the prices of these meat items will easily double again. Meanwhile, the prices for eggs and milk will also escalate since there will be less cows and chickens producing those products.

Cedar has been digging very deeply into current USDA statistics, including such things as the number of baby calves that were NOT born this year (a record low in baby calves born) which means less adult cows over the next 12 months to take the place of the ones going to slaughter -- including less milking cows. 

Farmers in the USA who are opting to hang onto their cows are having to buy wheat from Canada and corn from Brazil in order to feed their animals. 

You can read all of these details and so many more in that sticky-thread.

So yeah, the price of pouktry will be going up, but not because of the events of this news story here in this tiny little thread.


Oh and ... for ha-ha's sake .... I posted a few 3-year-old Stephen Colbert videos in that sticky-thread concerning the Super Bowl chicken wing crisis that happened 3 years back. Seems that in January of 2009 (several months after the huge financial meltdown of 2008 which bankrupted one chicken distributor) there was a shortage of chicken wings in the USA, threatening the sanctity of Super Bowl Sunday. Colbert called it the "Wing-A-Geddon."

http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=4771.msg414611#msg414611








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« Last Edit: August 31, 2012, 04:30:01 AM by Oil Lady »

Offline Dawgus

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70,000 chickens dying in 15 minutes pretty much proves how horrible the conditions really are in these "farms". No back-up power supply either? I'd think that these places would take that into consideration.

Offline Oil Lady

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70,000 chickens dying in 15 minutes pretty much proves how horrible the conditions really are in these "farms". No back-up power supply either? I'd think that these places would take that into consideration.

I had a roommate after college who was from Nebraska. She grew up on a cattle ranch and had neighbors who were chicken farmers. She said that these huge chicken barns MJUST have those exhaust fans blowing constantly. She also said that if you wanted to kill someone, just lock them into a chicken barn and turn off the fans. They'll be dead in less than an hour.

Offline Morning Sunshine

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70,000 chickens dying in 15 minutes pretty much proves how horrible the conditions really are in these "farms". No back-up power supply either? I'd think that these places would take that into consideration.

yeah.  those were my thoughts too.  if the chickens die in 15 minutes?  seriously that is awful.  Makes me really want to get chickens going on my own.

Offline rustyknife

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Seems like an operation that could keep 70k chickens going could also have some backup power system in case of a power outage from grid down,weather related and of course the occasional drunk friend of the daughter.  :o