Author Topic: Printed list of meds as a prep for 911 call  (Read 8278 times)

Offline Zuladad

  • Prepper
  • **
  • Posts: 47
  • Karma: 3
  • Do not be deceived
Printed list of meds as a prep for 911 call
« on: February 11, 2011, 12:16:55 PM »
I found a gaping hole in my commitment to prep for emergencies.  How about answering a string of questions asked by paramedics when they come into your home for an emergency, NOW, that you are experiencing.  Well, I learned a good lesson: have a printed list of the meds (RX & OTC) you are taking.  Plus the dosage & frequency taken.  I have a hard time anyway remembering what I take anyway, or pronouncing what I can remember, but under some bit of stress, it all flies out the window. 

The details aren't the issue, but . . .  As I was about to brush my teeth before bed, my nose started bleeding.  A couple of drips followed by a large & unrelenting stream of blood.  Yuck.  This went on for about 10 minutes before I finally relented to my wife's insistance on calling 911.

The calvary arrived withing minutes (those dear people), and immediately began asking questions.  I was OK for most answers, but when they asked what meds I was on (bp & colestrol), I choked, . . . a memory-choke.  (Plus the other, by this time.)

So off I go in the ambulance (but aren't ambulances for emergencies??).  When I arrived at the ER, the questions again re my meds.
While waiting to get the nasal branding iron, precious wife keeps saying things like: "Big preppers we are!"  "We suck as preppers."  "As soon as we get home (it's now about 0130!) you're going to put a list of your meds in your wallet!!!"  Etc.  I waited until the next day to do the list-in-the-wallet.

Anyway, thought this might be something worth passing on.

A side note: doc said the best thing for nose-bleed is to squeeze the nose, like you were jumping into a pool.  The hospital gave me a nose clamp thing.  Probably a swimmers nose clamp is perfect for preps, I think.

Offline archer

  • Administrator
  • Ultimate Survival Veteran
  • *******
  • Posts: 17126
  • Karma: 382
  • #ImissAmerica
    • Journey to Greener Pastures
Re: Printed list of meds as a prep for 911 call
« Reply #1 on: February 11, 2011, 01:55:35 PM »
Good post Zuladad. Good thing to have for your family members also.

Offline mskoyote

  • Prepper
  • **
  • Posts: 20
  • Karma: 6
Re: Printed list of meds as a prep for 911 call
« Reply #2 on: February 12, 2011, 10:03:54 AM »
As a nurse... yes, please do this! It's a huge help!

I'd also suggest including any OTC drugs, vitamins, supplements, and so forth that you would be likely to have in your system, a brief medical history if you have any issues that might be relevant, any negative reactions you have to medication, food, or materials used in medical supplies, and your PCP's name and contact info.

Be sure you update the list if any of the details change (including adjustments to dosage or timing).

Offline geoffreys7

  • Prepper
  • **
  • Posts: 58
  • Karma: 1
Re: Printed list of meds as a prep for 911 call
« Reply #3 on: February 12, 2011, 11:41:44 AM »
And doctors names & numbers.  If traveling and you're in an accident they can contact your doctors office for info.  We learned when my dsughter had a seizure on vacation.  She has them once in a while but she was on vacation with friends and they knew of her condition but didn't know anything about her doctor or treatment.  Now she, my wife & I all carry a list of our and her doctors!

Offline drthumbs

  • Survivalist Mentor
  • *****
  • Posts: 446
  • Karma: 51
Re: Printed list of meds as a prep for 911 call
« Reply #4 on: February 14, 2011, 10:14:53 PM »
YES, DO THIS!

It helps a great deal.  A printed list saves so much time and headache on my part and helps me get to providing care a lot faster than someone having to play memory games or gathing up pill bottles from around the house.  Or the worse, a guess the pill box. 

Add to it a list of you medical history  and med allergies and you have done half my job for me. ;D

Offline soccer grannie

  • Survivalist Mentor
  • *****
  • Posts: 892
  • Karma: 57
Re: Printed list of meds as a prep for 911 call
« Reply #5 on: February 15, 2011, 09:54:05 AM »
I don't know if WalMart still does this or not but they used to have free large empty pill bottles with a folded paper form inside. You list your meds, other medical info, physician, allergies, contact person, etc on the form and put the bottle in the fridge. They also included a sticker to be placed on your front storm door. The sticker alerted EMS to look in the fridge for the bottle with the info they need.

We also keep another set in the glove box. IIRC the instructions said to tape a bottle to the underside or back of a child's car seat with medical info in case the parent was unable to communicate with EMS.

Check with your local WalMart pharmacy and see if these are still available.

Offline reefmarker

  • Survivalist Mentor
  • *****
  • Posts: 486
  • Karma: 24
Re: Printed list of meds as a prep for 911 call
« Reply #6 on: February 21, 2011, 01:46:21 PM »
I don't know if WalMart still does this or not but they used to have free large empty pill bottles with a folded paper form inside. You list your meds, other medical info, physician, allergies, contact person, etc on the form and put the bottle in the fridge. They also included a sticker to be placed on your front storm door. The sticker alerted EMS to look in the fridge for the bottle with the info they need.

We also keep another set in the glove box. IIRC the instructions said to tape a bottle to the underside or back of a child's car seat with medical info in case the parent was unable to communicate with EMS.

Check with your local WalMart pharmacy and see if these are still available.

Most volunteer fire departments in this area have the bottles available also.  Not much interest in them though...

Offline Oil Lady

  • Lady oil lady oil la-dy hoo
  • Survival Demonstrator
  • *******
  • Posts: 4503
  • Karma: 317
  • My book needs more humor. My pen needs more salt.
Re: Printed list of meds as a prep for 911 call
« Reply #7 on: March 02, 2011, 04:11:59 PM »
Two years before my mom passed away, she began losing her eyesight (she eventually got declared legally blind) and could no longer manage all her medications (she couldn't even read the bottles anymore). So I began to manage her medications for her. They were so numerous, and the dosages schedule so complex that I got one of those pill minder things (also called a pill cartridge) and loaded them up for her. (Here's a typical pill minder.)



In order to help me keep track of all the pills, I set up a one-page chart on an Excel Spreadsheet and taped a hardcopy of it onto the fridge for no other reason than to be my own reference for whenever I had to reload the pill minder. And sometimes, when I ordered the refills from the pharmacy, I would bring the chart with me to talk to the pharmacist.

The night I had to call the ambulance for her, there it was. I yanked it off, handed it to the paramedics, and when they took her to the hospital (I followed in my car) the medics handed it to the ER nurse upon admission. It was VERY helpful to the doctors who treated her. 

Here's how my chart looked (I only included 3 drugs in this re-created chart here for you guys, not all 15 of them, and I changed the names of the doctors):


PHYSICIAN ... DRUG ........ COMPOSITION ........ QTY... DOSAGE ...................................... MORN .... NOON .... EVE .... BED .... TOTAL
Smith .......... Asacol ......... 400.0 MG Tablet .... 270 .. 3 tabs by mouth 3 times a day ........... 3........... 3 ......... 3 ......................9
Jones ......... Azathioprine ... 50.0  MG Tablet .... 90 ... 3 tabs by mouth every day ................. 3 ............................................... 3
Watson ...... Trazadone ...... 50.0 MG  Tablet ..... 60 ... 2 tabs by mouth at bedtome .................................................... 2 ............2

Doctor Smith 123 Main  Street, Boston MA, 02134 (508) 555-1212
Doctor Jones 456 Starte Street, Boston  MA 02134 (508) 555-2323
Doctor Watson 789 Gulf Street, Boston MA, 02134 (508) 555-3434


« Last Edit: March 02, 2011, 04:17:14 PM by Oil Lady »

Offline Pathfinder

  • Survival Demonstrator
  • *******
  • Posts: 2102
  • Karma: 97
Re: Printed list of meds as a prep for 911 call
« Reply #8 on: March 02, 2011, 06:44:46 PM »
My doctor actually provides that list, including the OTC meds every time I get a checkup. I like the idea of keeping a copy in the pill bottle just in case.

Offline Slomad

  • Prepper
  • **
  • Posts: 87
  • Karma: 6
Re: Printed list of meds as a prep for 911 call
« Reply #9 on: March 04, 2011, 09:01:26 AM »
I don't know if WalMart still does this or not but they used to have free large empty pill bottles with a folded paper form inside. You list your meds, other medical info, physician, allergies, contact person, etc on the form and put the bottle in the fridge. They also included a sticker to be placed on your front storm door. The sticker alerted EMS to look in the fridge for the bottle with the info they need.

We also keep another set in the glove box. IIRC the instructions said to tape a bottle to the underside or back of a child's car seat with medical info in case the parent was unable to communicate with EMS.

Check with your local WalMart pharmacy and see if these are still available.

It's called the Vial of Life program. I believe the program isn't in all areas yet, but it is widespread enough that they teach looking for the sticker as part of the national EMT curriculum. Here's some info on it:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vial_of_Life

Offline Dainty

  • Darth Dainty, Bunny Snuggler
  • Dedicated Contributor
  • ******
  • Posts: 1293
  • Karma: 72
  • Making it work!
Re: Printed list of meds as a prep for 911 call
« Reply #10 on: March 04, 2011, 11:42:29 AM »
Along these same lines, a medical bracelet is a good thing to consider if you have certain allergies or an ongoing condition that may influence emergency care. That way if you are unable to communicate and no one familiar with your health is nearby to provide the info the medics will still be informed.

There are also USB medical IDs where you can store a lot of other medical information that, to my understanding, gets into the right hands when you arrive at the hospital.

Offline kc9eci

  • Survivalist Mentor
  • *****
  • Posts: 480
  • Karma: 16
Re: Printed list of meds as a prep for 911 call
« Reply #11 on: March 04, 2011, 02:34:31 PM »
From an EMS point of view I can't express how nice it would be to roll in on a pt and ask about meds and get a list.  I can't tell you how many times I've had someone tell me what their meds are and I've had no freaking clue what it is, how it's spelled, or what it is supposed to do.

endurance

  • Guest
Re: Printed list of meds as a prep for 911 call
« Reply #12 on: March 04, 2011, 04:11:52 PM »
I actually printed out an Avery address label with all my meds and allergies on it, along with contact information for the GF and my doctor and stuck it to the back of my drivers license and on the inside of my bike helmet.  I used a number 4 font to get it to all fit and if the paramedic is in their 40s, they'll need a magnifying glass, but it's all there and with me 24/7.

Offline NWBowhunter

  • Survivalist Mentor
  • *****
  • Posts: 832
  • Karma: 24
  • Got Elk!
Re: Printed list of meds as a prep for 911 call
« Reply #13 on: March 04, 2011, 07:52:59 PM »
From an EMS point of view I can't express how nice it would be to roll in on a pt and ask about meds and get a list.  I can't tell you how many times I've had someone tell me what their meds are and I've had no freaking clue what it is, how it's spelled, or what it is supposed to do.


I'm in that crowd I can't remember the specifics of the meds my 81 yr old dad is on so we have a list on the computer with dosage purpose prescribing doctor.  1 copy for the EMT's one for the ER. He has a living will and other docs that go with him when a trip to the ER is required.

Offline Oil Lady

  • Lady oil lady oil la-dy hoo
  • Survival Demonstrator
  • *******
  • Posts: 4503
  • Karma: 317
  • My book needs more humor. My pen needs more salt.
Re: Printed list of meds as a prep for 911 call
« Reply #14 on: March 20, 2011, 02:43:48 PM »
Something else I'd like to add about keeping track of my mom's medicines ........


Her prescriptions were all 30-day durations. And yet the "rules" for refill (the insurance company rules) allowed her to call in the next refill after only 21 days (not make her wait the full 30 days), so she could get a jump-start on next month's pills.

I diligently spent almost a year deliberately calling in every single prescription a whole week (or more!) earlier than the full 30 days. After a year I successfully racked up a huge surplus of all her medications. I always had 3 fully loaded pill cartridges on hand (each cartridge was one week's worth of pills) and then no less than two full bottles of additional pills. I was super-careful about properly rotating the bottles to make sure I used the older bottles first. But had we ever been faced with a true SHTF situation (or even a minor disruption to shipping and commerce such as a snow storm or hurricane or whatever) where the local pharmacies might be understocked, or the delivery trucks supplying those pharmacies couldn't get through for maybe a week or longer, or if a power outage closed the pharmacy doors, or the employees at the pharmacy were unable to report to work at times, my mom was fully stocked up on pills for more than a 2 month supply.

A few weeks after she passed away, I went through the cartridges, emptied them out, and re-inserted all the pills back into the bottles again. She had well over 90 days worth of everything. So she was totally set. (The only thing she wouldn't have been covered for would have been oxygen. She had a home oxygen tank due to COPD. I have no idea what sort of contingency that anyone could resort to for home oxygen in a SHTF situation.)

The only drawback to what I did was that the computers at the insurance company discerned that 13 refills had happened during a 12-month period for one drug that was subject to extra controls. And so the computer threw up a red light. The pharmacist told me that the insurance company wouldn't pay just that one month, so I just paid for it myself that month because my higher priority was having that surplus of pills.

 

Offline reefmarker

  • Survivalist Mentor
  • *****
  • Posts: 486
  • Karma: 24
Re: Printed list of meds as a prep for 911 call
« Reply #15 on: March 21, 2011, 11:03:20 AM »
Something else I'd like to add about keeping track of my mom's medicines ........


Her prescriptions were all 30-day durations. And yet the "rules" for refill (the insurance company rules) allowed her to call in the next refill after only 21 days (not make her wait the full 30 days), so she could get a jump-start on next month's pills.
<SNIP SNIP>
 

My insurance company does this, but we get 10% to 20% early (depending on duration) and they keep track of it.  If you get this one a month prescription 3 days early, you can't get next months early also.  I tried.  They will let me buy it myself at the insurance companies price and it not count against my calendar though.

Offline hpdj

  • Fledgling Prepper
  • *
  • Posts: 1
  • Karma: 0
File of Life
« Reply #16 on: March 27, 2011, 10:17:51 PM »


"The File of Life is a voluntary program designed to help your local first responders to quickly obtain in an emergency your necessary medical history, your support needs, and your emergency contact information. It could help save your life.
 
File of Life
The File of Life is a refrigerator magnet with an attached red plastic pocket labeled “FILE OF LIFE”.  In the plastic pocket is a tri-fold card on which you can record your vital emergency information. Fill in the information on the card.  Remember, the information will help first responders to better assist you in an emergency."

As an EMT we distribute these to all our elderly patients to put on their fridge, and have smaller wallet sized ones so they can be kept on their person. Having this information on you would be invaluable if you or a family member were rendered unconscious or unable to relate information about medications or past medical history. I am not affiliated with the group at this link, but the form can be filled out on the computer. However, I recommend writing in pencil, especially the medications as they change frequently. Placing one of these on your refrigerator or of that of an elderly loved on, and in a purse/ wallet is a great help. Remember to update them when medications/ allergies and such change and note at the top.


http://www.cityofnovi.org/services/Fire/FireOfLifeMedicalForms.pdf

Alternatively contact your local 911 ambulance service, first aid/ rescue squad, fire house, or senior citizens center to see if they have them.