Survivalism & Self Sufficiency Topics > Home And Business Security

Shop was broken into, installed a camera/dvr system

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machinisttx:
Thanks!

creuzerm:
Looking at pre-solving this same problem. I am going to solve the distance issue with fiber optic networking. A family member gave me some "Media Converters". The ones I have are very nice POE (Power over ethernet) units at over $300 a piece new, but amazon has cheaper units down around $40 each.

Key locations in the house plus outbuildings will get fiber pulled to them, so I can have high speed (gigbit or 10gb) access with computers, plus solid connections to the wifi access points. The garage will get it's own wifi and ethernet networking so I can stream high-resolution cameras (4) plus motion sensors. Plus I will have my home-office in the garage until I can move it across the street.

I will probably use a couple of wifi access points that look like satellite dishes (or I may make my own directional antenna)  to jump the street and use the fiber networking to bring the internet all the way back to the remote building on 50 acres.

Fiber optic networking looks to be a bit more complicated, as it's not all compatible with itself like ethernet is.

My oversimplification as I currently understand it (somebody will probably jump in and correct me on some points)
The variations and compatibility checks revolve around laser, cable, and ends.
Three are  2 lasers 850nm and 1300nm or called multimode and singlemode respectivly.
There are 2 types of cable that works with either of the lasers, so you need to pick the appropriate cable. There then are different numberings dealing with the specific cable diameters such as 125/50 etc as well as ratings OM2, OM3. For short distances (under half a mile?) all we really need to concern ourselves with is multimode/singlemode as that interacts with the laser itself and the diameter. The other rating isn't a big impact on short distances.
There are several connector types, SC, LC, and a few others. These need to match.

It looks like to run fiber optic runs, we want 2 media converters to plug into the ethernet cable, and then a fiber optic cable that matches the specs on the media converter. I'd start with the cheap media converters, and get the fiber to suit that requirement. I don't think we need to spec it the other way around unless you are putting fiber along your fencelines to the barn on the opposite side of your square mile (wouldn't that be a great problem to have)

  This is a pair of gigabit media converts with 15 meters (nearly 50 feet) of fiber coiled up.

The fiber is more than the Cat5e/Cat6 that was mentioned previously, PLUS we still need some of that to manage each end. But the fiber can go much further, doesn't have issues with slowing down if it's in a saturated wet environment, and lightning won't follow it. And it can go faster if you get 10gb networking gear. Imaging reading files off a computer over the network from the far side of the property faster than your computer can write it to disk.

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