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Beginning welding

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FreeLancer:

--- Quote from: atl on August 28, 2019, 07:45:20 AM ---( I bought a nice Miller suit case welder on ebay for a significant discount a few years ago).

--- End quote ---

Is that the one that does MIG, TIG, and stick?

atl:
The one I found was a Miller 185 that will do Stick and Tig DC. That means it will not do aluminum as you have to reverse the polarity to weld aluminum. It is also 110 or 220 capable just by plugging in an adapter. The 110 option is good up to about 90 amps beyond that the duty cycle starts getting shorter and it overheats. That being said we use the crap out of it in an industrial setting just because it is so easy to drag around the plant.

They do have a series out now that runs wire. It is considerably heavier that the 160 to 185 series Maxstar. We have one of them set up for wire only but it only gets used when we have a big project going on.   

FreeLancer:
Yeah, that 13 lb Maxstar 161 is an intriguing little machine. 

I bought the Millermatic 211 a few years back to learn Mig with, it was a great machine for that, but I found I don't really have the room in my garage for the welding cart and cylinder and moving all that to the backyard to do flux core was a pain.  I just gave that whole setup to my dad to learn on, since he's got a huge shop space to work with.  Now I'm looking at my options for a smaller more portable setup, but I kind of hate to lose the Mig capability since I know I can produce halfway decent welds with that process.  Honestly, I wish now I'd bought the Multimatic 200 instead of the Mig only Millermatic 211 but it got crapped on on another thread by a guy flogging a machine that is now defunct.  Apparently lots of pros really love that little 200.

CarbideAndIron:
A flux/MIG is a great place to start, and super versatile. Either a Lincoln or Miller 140 (I think $580), or even the Titanium 140 ($400 Harbor Freight brand) are great welders for up to like 3/16" thick stuff. My buddy even did some 1/4" with his Lincoln 140. For the price those are hard to beat. You can find any of those used for a great price too.

machinisttx:

--- Quote from: atl on August 29, 2019, 07:07:27 AM ---The one I found was a Miller 185 that will do Stick and Tig DC. That means it will not do aluminum as you have to reverse the polarity to weld aluminum. It is also 110 or 220 capable just by plugging in an adapter. The 110 option is good up to about 90 amps beyond that the duty cycle starts getting shorter and it overheats. That being said we use the crap out of it in an industrial setting just because it is so easy to drag around the plant.

They do have a series out now that runs wire. It is considerably heavier that the 160 to 185 series Maxstar. We have one of them set up for wire only but it only gets used when we have a big project going on.

--- End quote ---

I'm late to the party here, but I'm going to correct something anyway. Aluminum can be stick welded. Aluminum can be welded with a DC TIG unit and helium or a helium mix shield gas. The weld won't look as nice as one done on an AC machine with high frequency, but it can be done.

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