Author Topic: CTD "Esbit" Style Stove w/Trioxane Review  (Read 9081 times)

Offline Serellan

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CTD "Esbit" Style Stove w/Trioxane Review
« on: October 02, 2008, 12:16:52 AM »
So I've been putting together my Emergency Kit, and part of it is firestarting and heating water.  As part of this, I picked up the "Esbit" style folding stove from CTD, along with the Trioxane bars/tabs.  Here are my thoughts after trying it out at home before I packed them up.
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First off, the folding stove is about the size of a pack of cards.  It is very light, and folds up tight, when unfolded, holds a pot nicely on a flat surface.  For storing or extreme emergency use, the stove itself will contain one Trioxane bar, possibly two tabs, or a packet of MRE gel fuel.  They come with one Trioxane bar.



Quickly, there are two types of Trioxane packages, bars and tabs.  It's pretty easy to classify them, tabs are half the size of bars.  You can get tabs and bars from man sources, from CTD, these stoves come with one bar.



Here was my test.  I used the stove and fired it up with one Trioxane tab burning, using a US issue aluminum pot for the water.  I wanted to see how it handled for water, so I used a large glass of cool water for the test.  The tabs work great, they fire up easily, and as firestarter they would be the sh**, but this is about the stove, so I won't go into that.





One Trioxane tab got the water very hot.  Hot, but not boiling.  Once the tab went out, I put in another and fired it up.  The second tab got the water boiling, but just barely and only for about a minute.  I didn't try two tabs at once or a bar or two.  This would have been fine to heat up an MRE meal (what they were designed for) or to cook some canned food or heat up a dehydrated pasta meal.  However, it would take a pile of them to boil the water enough to ensure it's bacteria-free.



My review of this product depends on your use. 

First off, for a backup camping stove:  BUY IT.  For $3.49, you get this handy little stove along with one fuel bar.  It is light enough that you really wont notice it in your pack, and it would be worth it to have the ability to heat up some water and have a hot meal for an extra night.  My backpack will contain one of these stoves and some extra Triox tabs just in case, it is worth the few bucks and ounces to make sure I have it just-in-case.

For a survival kit:  BUY IT, BUT:  Again, the price of the stove and the tabs/bars is great.  The tabs as a firestarter alone are worth it.  However, be advised that with the aforementioned large glass of water, the stove, and two tabs in a row, there was only a mild boiling of the water.  Now, maybe if I had put two tabs or a bar in at once, I might have gotten the boil faster, but I doubt the rolling boil for 10 minutes that I would want to make sure that bacteria was out of the water, it would take a smurf-load of tabs/bars to get that.  However, with Sterno, MRE gel, or other fire devices, this stove might be a good boil tool, if only to hold up your pot in the field.



So, overall:  This stove with the Triox tabs or bars is a great backup or emergency stove.  As part of an emergency kit, it is a great little stove to HEAT water to have hot drinks or hot food.  Just don't trust it with the Triox to BOIL water for safety.

LINKS TO BUY STOVE, TABS, BARS:

http://www.cheaperthandirt.com/MLT9089-1.html
http://www.cheaperthandirt.com/MGR826-1.html
https://www.mainemilitary.com/productcart/pc/viewPrd.asp?idcategory=0&idproduct=2277
https://www.mainemilitary.com/productcart/pc/viewPrd.asp?idcategory=0&idproduct=1242

Offline DeltaEchoVictor

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Re: CTD "Esbit" Style Stove w/Trioxane Review
« Reply #1 on: October 02, 2008, 01:37:17 AM »
Good review, thanks for the effort!

kaiservontexas

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Re: CTD "Esbit" Style Stove w/Trioxane Review
« Reply #2 on: October 02, 2008, 11:49:13 AM »
Good review!

I should have jumped on these when they were cheaper. I think it was little more then a year ago they were being sold for a dollar on the CTD website. Live and learn.  ::)

Anyway, this fits the solution I was thinking of for a light weight portable camping stove. I am going to pick one up with some fuel bars. Thanks for the info!   :)

Offline BigDanInTX

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Re: CTD "Esbit" Style Stove w/Trioxane Review
« Reply #3 on: October 02, 2008, 12:40:28 PM »
I'd love to see how someone compares this to the glorified Pepsi Stove offerings I've seen.  They use alcohol as a fuel source.

Also, if you run out of the fuel bars is there any contingency on a replacement fuel source?  Just musing, thanks.  =-]

jeremya

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Re: CTD "Esbit" Style Stove w/Trioxane Review
« Reply #4 on: October 02, 2008, 12:53:33 PM »
I will see if I can find one of my Pepsi can stoves and do a comparison.

-- Jeremy

Offline iron mike

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Re: CTD "Esbit" Style Stove w/Trioxane Review
« Reply #5 on: October 16, 2008, 03:00:07 AM »
I used the crap out of these little stoves while in the service.   They rock!!

Small sterno cans are a hair too tall to fit on the stove, 


Perhaps a potted meat can filled w/ cardborad & wax would serve as a replacement for heat tabs..   Those can be made out of what would otherwise be garbage.


A poor substitute would be tea candles.   You'd need a good wind break & a whole lot of time. to just heat alittle water for quick oats ect.

Nice review!

Offline ModernSurvival

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Re: CTD "Esbit" Style Stove w/Trioxane Review
« Reply #6 on: November 11, 2008, 03:21:18 PM »
Good review with one tid bit to add about making water safe to drink.

One does not need water to boil for any length of time for it to be bacteria free.  By the time water hits boiling 212 for even a second it has been over 180 long enough to kill any bacteria.  Really its' true I didn't make it up.

"According to the Wilderness Medical Society, water temperatures above 160° F (70° C) kill all pathogens within 30 minutes and above 185° F (85° C) within a few minutes. So in the time it takes for the water to reach the boiling point (212° F or 100° C) from 160° F (70° C), all pathogens will be killed, even at high altitude."

Source -  http://www.survivaltopics.com/survival/how-long-do-you-need-to-boil-water/

I have known this for a long time but no one ever believes it,  ;)

Offline archer

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Re: CTD "Esbit" Style Stove w/Trioxane Review
« Reply #7 on: November 11, 2008, 04:33:37 PM »
I was amazed when I read that water only has to reach boiling to be safe to drink. I was always taught that you had to boil it for 8-10 minutes. Just think of all the fuel wasted over the years.....

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Re: CTD "Esbit" Style Stove w/Trioxane Review
« Reply #8 on: November 11, 2008, 05:10:39 PM »
I was amazed when I read that water only has to reach boiling to be safe to drink. I was always taught that you had to boil it for 8-10 minutes. Just think of all the fuel wasted over the years.....

Good God, man.  Next you're gonna go tell Al Gore you were using all those carbon credits.......shame on you. ;)

(only replying cause I just learned that you don't need to boil water for 8-10 minutes....yeah, I wasted those credits also..... :-[)

On another note, I used to cook hotdogs over a trioxane tablet....they don't taste all that good.  Best if you cook them in water, or start a real fire with them.  Probably why I don't have any hair on my head, but lots in my lungs. ???

Offline Serellan

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Re: CTD "Esbit" Style Stove w/Trioxane Review
« Reply #9 on: November 13, 2008, 02:00:33 PM »
Yeah I don't think I would cook food directly on a triox tab, I'd be worried about the chemicals it may put out in.

Offline ModernSurvival

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Re: CTD "Esbit" Style Stove w/Trioxane Review
« Reply #10 on: November 13, 2008, 02:12:16 PM »
I have been considering some other options for small stoves like this.

I have lot of "rich lighter" pine but it is likely to leave a lot of resin on the item the food is being cooked.

Any dry small pieces of wood will work just fine, I guess a rocket stove would be better but these stoves are so fricken compact they are just awesome.

I also have wondered how "wood pellets" would be, they are small, burn efficient and hot and you could carry a bunch of them easily enough. 

The only issue with triox is expense, for an emergency or two no problem but if you had to use a stove like that long term it would be good to have options.  I have never tried burning just a small quantity of them wood pellets I will have to give is a go, it may work well or it may be a spectacular failure.
« Last Edit: November 13, 2008, 02:20:48 PM by ModernSurvival »

millerized1

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Re: CTD "Esbit" Style Stove w/Trioxane Review
« Reply #11 on: November 13, 2008, 03:46:06 PM »
I also have wondered how "wood pellets" would be, they are small, burn efficient and hot and you could carry a bunch of them easily enough. 
Let me find the link, but you mix the wood pellets with a little bit of alcohol....let me find the link:    Still looking, hard time finding it....but it was a small camp stove about the same size, lots of holes in the outside can, alcohol soaked pellets, barely heated a pint of water....If you had some way of adding air, they burned well, but without that extra air it just smoldered.
 There's one out there that has a few batteries and fan, IT supposedly works well with pellets, pine cones, cow poo.  Lots of alternatives out there.
« Last Edit: November 13, 2008, 04:32:07 PM by Millerized »

Supertramp

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Re: CTD "Esbit" Style Stove w/Trioxane Review
« Reply #12 on: December 09, 2008, 08:49:09 PM »
well i might as well throw my 2cents (1american)in here to.i love the good ole hobo/twig stove.i use j falk design-1 juice tin with top cut out and a  big triangle cut out of the side to feed the wood into and about 5-6 churchkey cutouts on opposite bottom.it works better to lay something on top to allow space for the flames to lick out of (tent pegs or cotter pins on the can).i can boil water in no time and best of all the fuel is free a (twigs are everywhere).i also have drilled 4 holes to place tentpegs for my alcohol stove to sit on at the appropriate height and makes the perfect wind shield.i've made the  popcan stove in a few different configs but have since purchased the white box stove which holds more fuel and is tougher being made with aluminum stadium bottles which i have no access to.so thats it-2 stoves in one and is very light and easy to pack

Offline ejsandstrom

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Re: CTD "Esbit" Style Stove w/Trioxane Review
« Reply #13 on: December 10, 2008, 10:26:27 AM »
Good review. I got 3 of these and have used them exactly twice, but they work great. They are small enough to fit in the dogs packs with a few extra bars. I walked in to AxMan and they had 3 cases. I think they had 3 bars in a box and 3 boxes for a buck. I should have bought all 3 cases. Hind site is a mother.

Offline templar223

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Esbit Pocket stove review
« Reply #14 on: May 11, 2010, 01:14:22 PM »
I do gear reviews for GunNews Magazine, the monthly journal of Guns Save Life.  Here's one I've done for the upcoming June 2010 issue.

Hope some here find it helpful.

Enjoy...

John



Product Review
Esbit Pocket Stove




by John Boch
(Guns Save Life) - The Esbit Pocket Stove is a tiny and lightweight foldable stove popular with backpackers and others who want a small stove without packing a lot of weight.  About the size of a deck of cards, it weighs only a couple of ounces. 

The stove itself sells for about $10 and the Esbit fuel cubes come in boxes of a dozen for about $6.  The fuel blocks have a bit of an offensive odor, so I recommend storing them in a quart-sized heavy duty freezer bag (or better still, double bag them).

I purchased one of these to boil water for Mountain House meals or instant oatmeal while hiking/camping or to heat up water for hot chocolate at the next cold and rainy Appleseed event.

I decided, almost on a whim, to give it a test run.  Frankly, I expected the manufacturer’s claims to be accurate as to this diminutive stove’s capabilities and I came away very disappointed.

These stoves are very sensitive to wind.  Sans any real windbreak, the first fuel cube only raised the temperature of 20oz of water from 70 degrees to 135 over a seven minute burn time.  That’s a far cry from the manufacturer’s claims that a fuel cube will burn for 12 minutes and bring 16oz of water to a rolling boil in eight minutes.

I picked up a piece of metal ductwork - specifically a 5” to 4” reduction connection - to act as a windbreak.   That effectively made two windbreaks - the 5” diameter segment (about 2” tall) and the reduction segment (about 3” tall).  With my cordless drill, I drilled a series of air holes on both top and bottom to facilitate airflow. 

My second test on a very windy Easter Day only netted me 185 degree water (20oz starting at about 60 degrees) after burning two fuel blocks which still only burned for about 7 minutes each with the benefit of the windbreak. 

This tiny little stove doesn’t have much horsepower (an LP gas or Coleman fuel camping stove it isn’t), but it beats nothing.  It is backpacking friendly thanks to its size and non-volatile fuel but you’re going to need patience and a lot of fuel to boil your water.

The moral of the story here is to do your best to shelter your stove and cooking vessel from the wind as much as possible.  As always, don’t forget to bring along plenty of spare fuel blocks and a trusty lighter or matches if your plan includes an Esbit.

Would I recommend this stove to a friend?  No.  Not unless it filled a very special niche for them. 

endurance

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Re: Esbit Pocket stove review
« Reply #15 on: May 11, 2010, 01:50:02 PM »
I've actually been pleasantly surprised with the Esbit cubes, but I'm using a slightly different stove (some european military surplus, smaller and brass).  I've had 20 oz. reach a full boil within the lifetime of the fuel cube inside a hotel room bathroom with the fan going. 

No, it's not a replacement for the backpacking stove, but it makes a solid backup stove or a compact stove if you just want to heat up a cup of tea or chicken bullion on a cold day in the field. Why I got better performance than you?  I couldn't say.  Maybe warmer starting water, maybe the smaller stove concentrated the heat better, maybe the bottom of my pan had more black on it so absorbed the heat better, or maybe it was the fact I was at 8,500' in elevation where the boiling point is closer to 185 than 212F.  As always, YMMV, but I'm quite content with the little Esbit fuel cubes and will continue to use them as both a back up stove and for my just in case stove when I'm not planning on needing a stove.

Offline Lara

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Re: CTD "Esbit" Style Stove w/Trioxane Review
« Reply #16 on: August 21, 2010, 08:03:46 PM »


I did a little test-run today before my backpacking trip next week.  I'm at ~460 feet elevation right now.  The cube burned for 15 minutes total.  Got 400 mL of water up to 200 degrees F (I used a candy thermometer to test it).  Simmered but never boiled.  Will do a better job at altitude.  Probably plenty hot for reconstituting pre-packaged backpacking food.  I'll give any more input I may have after my trip.  It's very lightweight and compact, and the stove/fuel fit into the pot for storage and backpacking.