Author Topic: Preparedness as a Retirement Plan  (Read 150687 times)

Offline CdnGuy

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Re: Preparedness as a Retirement Plan
« Reply #30 on: September 23, 2009, 07:37:06 PM »
It is funny how commonality of preparation works,,, If you are prepared for a genuinely secure and strings-free retirement, you are more or less prepared for all but the worst SHTF scenarios.

Great post CdnGuy,

Yes! you get it! If you are prepared for the day-to-day disasters, you'll be prepared for larger scale disasters. That's something James Talmadge Stevens expounds upon. And Jack does too, of course! Oh, and me. And all the Mods.  ;D

Thanks for the compliment!

Offline CdnGuy

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Re: Preparedness as a Retirement Plan
« Reply #31 on: September 23, 2009, 07:42:15 PM »
+1 Cdnguy!
I love this thread.  So many people putting into words what got me started here.  I looked around last fall when the economy was tanking and my retirement account was dwindling.  I'm in my late 30's and figured out i dont want to work til i am in my 70's (which is what retirement will be when we get there).  So we started doing the dave ramsey thing and as i looked at cutting expenses.  I quickly figured out the more self sufficient you are, the less money you have going out.  As i looked for podcasts on self sufficiency i came across tsp.  I continue to be amazed by this forum and the show.  I still put money in retirement that i wont be able to touch til i reach whatever arbitrary age the government says is 'retirement', but i am also stashing money elsewhere and making plans to slow down ('semi-retire if you will') before 50.  Your discussion of weaning down what it takes to live is a conversation my wife and i had several months ago. We are blessed to live on 5 acres several miles from town, so we are starting alot of this already.
 Again, thanks for bringing it here for discussion since reading about others thinking and doing the same thing makes it feel more doable.
Wonderful! Glad to hear that you are headed in the right direction. I'm also glad to hear that you are truly diversifying your investments and not just putting it all in the financial paper market. Jack says it plainly - that is NOT diversifying. You've just bought different cuts of pork from the same pig. It's still all pig though.

One of the best things to happen to me recently was when the dog chewed through the satellite cable. Now I have found TSP and started my own blog. I don't think that would have happened sitting in front of the flickering-blue babysitter.

Offline wookie in the forest

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Re: Preparedness as a Retirement Plan
« Reply #32 on: September 24, 2009, 08:33:59 PM »
I am glad to see that more people are going agrarian in one form or another. I thought I was the only throw back on this board for the longest time. I am not trying to insult or isolate but to emit happiness.

My situation is almost exactly what Cdnguy stated in the initial post. I have taken in the wife's parents who are both medically disabled (father is two year survivor of cancer and a 25 year survivor of a broken back) and mother in law is currently in the hospital getting back surgery. Why did we integrate/adopt her parents? Because we had seen how their lives had become sedentary and we had seen the repercussions of that with the great grandparents. Two years retired and in the dirt due to in-activity. That was not going to happen on my watch. So now we have live in babysitters and homestead executives that tend the little ones and mold the wooded ten acres in a legacy that will support all of us one day. Dad has progressed from suicide thru being sedentary after his first bout with cancer to teaching, creating, watching and growing my sons and our property (we think as a collective now) into something like a commune...

I do not want to work forever and be alone in the end. I want my children to learn in the best situation I can give them and maybe, just maybe, they will be able to take care of me while I create for their kids. I want to leave a means for freedom not an obligation to finish my debts. I want everything done: food, shelter, heat, electricity and education so that they can "opt in" on their  terms and not popular societies' opinion of what should be the status quo. I want Independence for all of us.

 As of this point I have nine people here (all family) that are pitching in and creating there own niches on the property. One of the rules is "do whatever you want, as long as it hurts no one and could help everyone". I have so much going on around here it gets mind boggling. I look around and I see two solar water heater projects, one earth oven in a test phase, two small gardens, one giant compost area, two ponds being built and I spotted a swale test over by the new apple trees and I have my animal projects. I just found out tonite about the water line being run to the back of the property. Apparently they want to make a campground/RV area with a community cook and relax area/building.

i just try to keep everyone focused on one or three goals so we don't waste time or money and keep it legal.

I think i will start a thread on this so as not to hijack. Where should I put it?

Chin up and shovel down...


Dave B

Offline ClarkB

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Re: Preparedness as a Retirement Plan
« Reply #33 on: September 24, 2009, 09:42:55 PM »
The concept of preparedness as retirement is exactly the course I am trying to follow right now.  It would be nice to be 38 again, but that was twenty years ago.  Nineteen years ago I met my wife (who is now a mostly recovered ex-grasshopper), and ended up living in the 'burbs with my wife, stepkids, and  mother-in-law.  This was not my original plan, but I love the gal, so I lived in the suburbs, while being a nature loving ant at heart. 

Now, we are cashing in all of our retirement savings accounts (she has income from a government pension, from 31 years as a probation officer) and using that money, and the proceeds from the sale of our current house, to pay off debt and to purchase our dream homestead which costs twice what our present home is worth.  The new place is mostly self sufficient - wood heat, dual wells, septic, lots of wild game, and good garden and market farming potential.  We will have a mortgage, a small electric bill (for now), and property taxes.  If the economy rebounds (yeah, right) then all will be well and we will pay off the mortgage with our share of the prosperity.  if (hyper?)inflation strikes then our profit from the sale of food, wood, and hay will increase while the mortgage remains constant and we will pay it off with inflated dollars.  We will be able to survive without much of any outside electric supply.  This will keep us secure and happy, and provide a valuable asset to leave the kids at the end of the road.

For our situation, the property has an excellent single wide home for my MIL to live in, about 200 feet from the main house.  Assuming that my MIL (84 yrs old) will die before my wife and I, then in our decrepit years we can give free rent in the single-wide to a caretaker to do the physical chores, thus filling the role of the 'younger generation' in the earlier scenario of how family homesteads had different jobs for different ages, in order to help run the property.

I don't trust any other form of retirement.  Stocks, cash, social security, certificates, bonds, IOUs, etc. are just PAPER.  Lots of luck with that when the SHTF.  Land, ammo, gold and silver metal, fuel, and food will be the new wealth.  Now is the time to convert most monetary investments to real hard assets.  As for the "tax authorities" taxing any bartering - fat chance.  Without W2/1099 forms, receipts, a common form of exchange (currency), or bank records; we are on the honor system.  I guess the tax man would have to be standing in back of the barn when a dozen eggs gets traded for some welding, etc.  However, at that point in time I think the tax man may be quite busy himself bartering to feed his clan.  I wonder how the 'tax man' will report such activities in an honor system?             

Offline CdnGuy

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Re: Preparedness as a Retirement Plan
« Reply #34 on: September 24, 2009, 10:11:17 PM »
I do hope that the new home that costs twice as much won't burden you with twice the mortgage. Maybe do some research on rates and consider locking in longer, even if the rate is a bit higher than the best rate right now. I'd be willing to bet we'll see 18% again in the next few years. Just like the early 80's. Just something to think about.

The unfortunate thing about counting on inflation dollars, is that the inflation in income seriously lags on inflation in prices. Trying to survive that stretch is what knocks most people on their keister.

You went through the 80's. This isn't anything you don't know, I know that. But for those folks that weren't around, or don't remember, hopefully this benefits them.

Offline ClarkB

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Re: Preparedness as a Retirement Plan
« Reply #35 on: September 25, 2009, 09:03:57 AM »
The mortgage will be more than we pay now, but the other costs of living will be less.  We will be getting a 30 yr fixed mortgage, so we won't worry about a change interest rates.  Yep, I did live through the 80's.  In cleaning our current house for the move I ran across a 'mortgage rate book' from 1980/81.  This was before PC's or the internet, so books with tables were used to estimate mortgages.  The mortgage rates in that book STARTED at 16%. 

We will work to pay off the new homestead ahead of schedule.  We plan on being small time market farmers, will have 20 acres in hay, and we will have a 120 acre forest for firewood and timber sales.  If inflation strikes then food costs will increase quickly, so we will rely on crop sales as one way to fill the gap.  I have no problem with participating in the underground economy and/or bartering.  We will be rid of virtually all consumer debt, so the mortgage and taxes will be the only bills.  If society really collapses then the government will have a hard time collecting taxes since they will be too busy saving their collective asses. 

Finally, there is the fact that I love the place we are buying.  It is 144 acres with field and forest, a trout stream, 3 waterfalls, deer, turkey, etc.  The three neighbors are a 150 acre farm that has been owned by the same family for 3 generations (they are staying), a 310 acre parcel with no house and a conservation easement that only allows one dwelling in the future, and a 570 acre state forest.  Therefore, about 6 people live in 1,000 acres, but it is only 30 miles from an urban center.  If an EMP hits, or hyperinflation shows up, then there is no place I'd rather be.  The rest of the time it is heaven on Earth, assuming you can survive 3 months of some of the roughest winters in the U.S.

So there is my retirement plan - Divest of all 'assets' that I don't physically control; convert all monetary assets to a homestead and become self-sufficient in food, energy, and shelter; and be able to physically defend the property in the case of an EMP, roving hoards, or complete social collapse.  It will also make a great and lasting inheritance for future generations.

Offline Preppernation

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Re: Preparedness as a Retirement Plan
« Reply #36 on: September 26, 2009, 11:50:39 AM »
Thanks CdnGuy, Jack and everyone else that has been sharing their dreams and success stories.

   We've been working toward this end as well. I have to admit to being a prepper for many years. However, having found thesurvivalpodcast.com I have been really ramping up. Jack has inspired us to fnally start DOING alot of the things that only made it to our "To Do List" previously. Thanks Jack!

   I've gotten so excited about what we have been getting done and trying to follow in the example that has been set by a number of influences over the last year, I have started a website to begin documenting the projects I've been working on. This is motivational for me and my family but also hopefully will inspire many to get moving on their own projects.

   When I started to listen to the podcast 6-8 months ago I couldn't believe that I was hearing all the things going on in my own head, coming off my IPOD... Only from the IPOD they were so much more organized. It was encouraging to hear a credible, rational voice telling me to get moving and that I'm not crazy!

   We have been using the "preps toward retirment" plan for a year or so. We have a BOL and have gotten some fruit trees started, irrigation lines ran to where the new garden will be beginning next spring. We have our own well and septic, we are on grid power but that will be our only utility bill. I have a couple of solar panels already purchased but not yet installed but they're available if something goes wrong prior to formal install., also the beginnings of our battery bank, charger, etc.

   My daughter is turning 17 in a week or so and I'm roughly the same age as Jack. We have a similar timeline on making a permanent move to our BOL shortly after our baby is squared away on schooling. Obviously, those expenses could slow us down a year or two but we will make the move in only a few short years.

   We couldn't justify the expense of building a stick built home on our 10 acres at this point, it all had to be mortgage free or no deal! So we ended up with what has turned out to be an excellent home - 1997 Singlewide mobile. I had no experience with these homes and have so far been extremely happy with it. Cost $19,000 including the move of over 200 miles and being reset on our land. Now I know that aint free but it was what we could do paying cash. I have seen this age of homes going for MUCH cheaper since but I'm not going to cry over it. 2 bedrooms and 2 full baths with all the necessities, laundry and large kitchen, paid for!

   We're on our way, one daughter and mortgage in the city stand between us and country living. Yes, I am well aware what this prized country living will mean - alot of hard work, I can't wait!!

If anyone is interested in seeing some of what we've gotten done and watching our place progress, check out the website -

www.preppernation.com

Keep up the good work everybody,

Prepper

Offline Heavy G

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Re: Preparedness as a Retirement Plan
« Reply #37 on: September 26, 2009, 02:17:01 PM »
preppernation:

Cool web site you have there. 

Now, back to the topic at hand ...

Offline Sid

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Re: Preparedness as a Retirement Plan
« Reply #38 on: September 26, 2009, 09:20:46 PM »
There are physical assets, and then there are paper assets.  A piece of productive land, a wood stove, a few milk cows, a few head of beef cattle, a wood lot, a chicken house, hand tools, a water well, gold and silver coins, guns and ammunition, an orchard, and the like are physical assets; these assets have intrinsic value from the use to which they can be put.  Social security, a pension, a 401(k) plan, a bank account, stocks and bonds, insurance policies, annuities, and the like, are paper assets, all of which depend upon the promises or obligations of others to give these assets value; they have no intrinsic value unless you plan to use them to start a fire.

To live through a period of economic collapse and survive, you are much better off to have real assets, and no debts, instead of paper assets or debts.






Offline CdnGuy

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Re: Preparedness as a Retirement Plan
« Reply #39 on: September 27, 2009, 11:02:26 AM »
There are physical assets, and then there are paper assets.  A piece of productive land, a wood stove, a few milk cows, a few head of beef cattle, a wood lot, a chicken house, hand tools, a water well, gold and silver coins, guns and ammunition, an orchard, and the like are physical assets; these assets have intrinsic value from the use to which they can be put.  Social security, a pension, a 401(k) plan, a bank account, stocks and bonds, insurance policies, annuities, and the like, are paper assets, all of which depend upon the promises or obligations of others to give these assets value; they have no intrinsic value unless you plan to use them to start a fire.

To live through a period of economic collapse and survive, you are much better off to have real assets, and no debts, instead of paper assets or debts.

Agreed. A bird in the hand is still worth at least two in the tree.

Offline ColdHaven

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Re: Preparedness as a Retirement Plan
« Reply #40 on: September 27, 2009, 12:57:12 PM »
Here is something to know. For some reason a big number with the IRS is 1,000. You can give a gift to someone up to 1,000 a year tax free. This is true on a piece of land being called a farm. If it produces more than 1,000 dollars worth of revenue then it is considered a farm, but then you are subject to taxes and such because of the sales. In order for them to tax you they would have to place an amount on what you have given to other people. These bartered items could be considered gifts, of which, the other person gave you a gift in return. They would have to have a provable itemized list of the things you gave each other as gifts in order to say you gave each other more than 1,000 dollars worth during the course of a year. When you are talking small money items like vegetables and fruits you would have to give a lot to each other, and they would have to be able to itemize each thing you gave...which of course they would not be able to do. If they did try to itemize what they can proove you can base it off the value you would get from a farmer's market which is considerably lower than grocery store prices.

Offline cohutt

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Re: Preparedness as a Retirement Plan
« Reply #41 on: September 27, 2009, 02:10:10 PM »
Coldhaven,

Not to trying to split hairs but you can gift practically as much as you want to someone "tax free". 

Over $12,000/yr/recipient and your estate exemption is reduced by anything over $12,000 in that year.  I could gift you $100,000 tommorrow (haha in theory of course) and neither one of us would owe a cent in tax.  I'd think the reporting form is #741 or something like that where I report the excess of the $12,000 for future reckoning on my estate tax return.

Dish over $1,000,000 in excess of the exempt $12,000/tr/recipient cumulative and you would be in gift tax land but most of us won't ever have to worry about it.

On the rest-  Technically all bartered value is supposed to be reported as income.   Gifting with the expectation of receiving a gift in return isn't gifting, it is bartering.  Not my opinion, unfortunately these are the tax regs.  "Arms length" evaluation of gifts and a lot of other types of transactions are of interest to the IRS.     The IRS really expects us to report this  even if only a few dollars hahahahahahahaha. 

My point is if the IRS is on you that argument won't hold water.

The other thing to consider is what are known as the hobby loss rules.  They expect us to report all income from any side hobby like a gentleman's farming operation but then won't let us take a loss.  We have to prove it is a true business in order to take losses in excess of income.

Yeah it is stacked.

Offline Lowdown3

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Re: Preparedness as a Retirement Plan
« Reply #42 on: September 30, 2009, 09:53:47 AM »
Folks have been doing this for years, we started well over a decade ago with the "homestead retirement" plan.

It's not that you want likely need ANY money, it's that you'll need so much LESS money.

When you actually own everything you have, no mortgage no car payments, when you have an AE producing your power, when you are growing/raising most of your food, how much LESS money would you need?

Yes the people that run to the doc for every sniffle and can't do some simple research on their own are still, and/or have chronic medical conditions are still going to have to pay for health insurance. However once your actually LIVING this way, i.e, not just talking about it, you'll find that your health will improve GREATLY.

Fresh air, the TV off, plenty of homestead work, the great outdoors to exercise in, eating food fresh from your garden, clean water without all kinds of chemicals in it, less air pollution, etc. all will contribute to better health conditions.

It's a great way to live, we've been at it a decade now and I wouldn't move back to the suburbs for all the money in the world. And of course if something actually does happen, people are going to die en mass in the cities and suburbs. And if nothing ever does happen, we are living for much less and experiencing much more freedom than the average city dweller.

Offline TexDaddy

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Re: Preparedness as a Retirement Plan
« Reply #43 on: September 30, 2009, 07:31:59 PM »
Well, as of today, I am doing this for real. After 37 years, 2 months, 2 weeks and 3 days with the same company, as of 3:30pm CDT today, I am retired. Free at last, free at last....

The savings will be converted to real assets.  Debts, history. I can devote all of my energy to working directly for my family and me. I feel powerful.

The folks on this forum have contributed hugely to my ability to do this at this time. Plus, of course, working towards the goal, and a great retirement deal from my current former employer.

All I have learned here (homesteading, permaculture, emergency preps, etc.) provided the boost needed to get over the top. Thank you, to all that have helped.

Offline cohutt

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Re: Preparedness as a Retirement Plan
« Reply #44 on: September 30, 2009, 07:40:34 PM »
Congrats TexDaddy!

Offline monkeyboyf

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Re: Preparedness as a Retirement Plan
« Reply #45 on: September 30, 2009, 07:51:14 PM »
Congratulations,TXDaddy, when do you plan to move to the BOL? I have never been sorry that I retired after working since I was 14.  Work harder now, but it's for me.

Offline TexDaddy

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Re: Preparedness as a Retirement Plan
« Reply #46 on: September 30, 2009, 08:08:09 PM »
Congratulations,TXDaddy, when do you plan to move to the BOL?
As soon as my wife will let us go. Progress little by little. At least, now I have only one boss. :D

Thanks Cohutt and monkeyboyf. It feels so good.

Offline Heavy G

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Re: Preparedness as a Retirement Plan
« Reply #47 on: September 30, 2009, 08:10:23 PM »
Wow, TexDaddy.  Super cool.  Good for you.  Taking control of your life.  You'll never regret this.

Offline dudekrtr

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Re: Preparedness as a Retirement Plan
« Reply #48 on: September 30, 2009, 08:13:27 PM »
Well, as of today, I am doing this for real. After 37 years, 2 months, 2 weeks and 3 days with the same company, as of 3:30pm CDT today, I am retired. Free at last, free at last....

The savings will be converted to real assets.  Debts, history. I can devote all of my energy to working directly for my family and me. I feel powerful.

The folks on this forum have contributed hugely to my ability to do this at this time. Plus, of course, working towards the goal, and a great retirement deal from my current former employer.

All I have learned here (homesteading, permaculture, emergency preps, etc.) provided the boost needed to get over the top. Thank you, to all that have helped.

Absolutely awesome!

I propose a TSP toast- to TexDaddy- long life now made longer with new freedom! Cheers!

[should we make this a tradition when anyone of us "pulls the plug"?]

Offline Ian-FW

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Re: Preparedness as a Retirement Plan
« Reply #49 on: September 30, 2009, 08:14:55 PM »
Retirement planning was pretty much what got me into survivalism in the first place. I realized in college that I really had zero desire to work for someone else 40 hours a week for 40 years of my life. The two ways out that I came up with were to either get a whole lot of money somehow, or not need a whole lot of money. I don't have any wealthy relatives to leave me fortunes, so I went with the latter plan. :)

I found a piece of land shortly before I graduated, and bought it with the bit of money I did have saved up (I'd kept that money in hand and gotten student loans, rather than pay for school out of pocket). After I graduated, I found a job that paid well (bartending), and started saving money. The first year, I paid off all my student loans. The two years after that, all my money went into a shoe box to pay for building my house. This spring I decided I had enough put away, quit the job, and moved up to the property to start building. I'm now about two months away from having the house finished to the building inspector's eye (hooray first-time homebuyer tax credit!). Then this winter I'll be going back to the city for another job, because I need to save up more to put in my alt power system (I was able to put in the well, septic, and house, but can't swing the power yet - and I have zero interest in getting a loan for it).

In a couple more years like this, I hope to have my house all finished, the greenhouse up and running, a nice workshop put up, and be able to sustain myself through my hobbies. It's easy to live beneath the IRS' standard deduction when you have no power bill, water bill, sewer bill, car payment, or mortgage. I can live for myself and pursue things I find interesting, rather than spend my whole life making money for someone else. I don't know why more people don't do the same thing...

Offline TexDaddy

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Re: Preparedness as a Retirement Plan
« Reply #50 on: September 30, 2009, 08:31:04 PM »
I don't know why more people don't do the same thing...
Way to go. The reason is, we do not believe we can. Plus, we thought we needed more.

Thanks to y'all also, Heavy G and dudekrtr. I like making the toast a TSP tradition. Great idea, dudekrtr. +1

Offline CdnGuy

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Re: Preparedness as a Retirement Plan
« Reply #51 on: September 30, 2009, 10:22:19 PM »
Well, as of today, I am doing this for real. After 37 years, 2 months, 2 weeks and 3 days with the same company, as of 3:30pm CDT today, I am retired. Free at last, free at last....

The savings will be converted to real assets.  Debts, history. I can devote all of my energy to working directly for my family and me. I feel powerful.

The folks on this forum have contributed hugely to my ability to do this at this time. Plus, of course, working towards the goal, and a great retirement deal from my current former employer.

All I have learned here (homesteading, permaculture, emergency preps, etc.) provided the boost needed to get over the top. Thank you, to all that have helped.

Very glad and encouraged to read this! Thanks TexDaddy!

Offline CdnGuy

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Re: Preparedness as a Retirement Plan
« Reply #52 on: September 30, 2009, 10:26:01 PM »
I can live for myself and pursue things I find interesting, rather than spend my whole life making money for someone else. I don't know why more people don't do the same thing...

Honestly, because most of us don't think of it. We get the "get a good job" mantra pushed on us. Once we are told to look for a job, we stop looking for anything else.

Does my heart good to hear about a younger person doing this. I assume you are younger - I could be wrong. It's all about the mindset isn't it?

Offline hd45hunt

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Re: Preparedness as a Retirement Plan
« Reply #53 on: October 01, 2009, 09:18:19 AM »
Congrats TexDaddy!  I agree about making the toast a tradition as one of us is able to pull the plug ;)

Offline EmmaPeel

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Re: Preparedness as a Retirement Plan
« Reply #54 on: October 01, 2009, 10:06:21 AM »
Congratulations to those with freedom. 

I think, CdnGuy is right.  We are pushed from day one to excel.  To many, excelling means good grades, college, great paying job, nice house, new cars, etc.  I think one of the biggest this we can do for our children is to help them realize that this is not the only path to happiness and may not lead to happiness at all.  I don't think schools teach the ability or desire to learn.  It is my biggest wish that my girls have the desire to learn, to seek things out for themselves.  I feel this will lead to being able to see their path to happiness, no matter what it might be. 

Offline LvsChant

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Re: Preparedness as a Retirement Plan
« Reply #55 on: October 01, 2009, 10:32:54 AM »
Congratulations, TexDaddy... hope we can go to the range this month as a mini-celebration!

Offline TexDaddy

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Re: Preparedness as a Retirement Plan
« Reply #56 on: October 01, 2009, 10:34:27 AM »
Congratulations, TexDaddy... hope we can go to the range this month as a mini-celebration!
I am looking forward to it. PM me when you are ready to go!

Offline Ultraist

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Re: Preparedness as a Retirement Plan
« Reply #57 on: October 04, 2009, 12:49:50 PM »
Retirement planning was pretty much what got me into survivalism in the first place. I realized in college that I really had zero desire to work for someone else 40 hours a week for 40 years of my life. The two ways out that I came up with were to either get a whole lot of money somehow, or not need a whole lot of money. I don't have any wealthy relatives to leave me fortunes, so I went with the latter plan. :)

I found a piece of land shortly before I graduated, and bought it with the bit of money I did have saved up (I'd kept that money in hand and gotten student loans, rather than pay for school out of pocket). After I graduated, I found a job that paid well (bartending), and started saving money. The first year, I paid off all my student loans. The two years after that, all my money went into a shoe box to pay for building my house. This spring I decided I had enough put away, quit the job, and moved up to the property to start building. I'm now about two months away from having the house finished to the building inspector's eye (hooray first-time homebuyer tax credit!). Then this winter I'll be going back to the city for another job, because I need to save up more to put in my alt power system (I was able to put in the well, septic, and house, but can't swing the power yet - and I have zero interest in getting a loan for it).

In a couple more years like this, I hope to have my house all finished, the greenhouse up and running, a nice workshop put up, and be able to sustain myself through my hobbies. It's easy to live beneath the IRS' standard deduction when you have no power bill, water bill, sewer bill, car payment, or mortgage. I can live for myself and pursue things I find interesting, rather than spend my whole life making money for someone else. I don't know why more people don't do the same thing...


The steps you've taken seem similar to the ones I'm about to...
Have you documented your journey in excessive detail anywhere?
We're on the verge of this adventure, and I'm trying to take in as much info as I can before the plunge.
As a family of 6, there's a lot to consider.

Offline Ian-FW

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Re: Preparedness as a Retirement Plan
« Reply #58 on: October 05, 2009, 06:54:39 PM »
Sorry - the only record out there is Joel's blog, which is far from comprehensive. I'd be happy to answer any particular questions you might have, though (either here or via PM).

Offline Ultraist

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Re: Preparedness as a Retirement Plan
« Reply #59 on: October 07, 2009, 07:44:59 PM »
I really don't have any specific questions per se, but rather am looking for a wide spectrum analysis that might bring up any issues I haven't thought about;  things that worked, things that didn't, things that came up unexpectedly...

In my personal situation, it began with a time / money logic loop that I had been stuck in, resulting in me spinning my wheels in terms of progress toward the end goal.  The way out of it (so far) has been to say "to Hell with money" and instead free up the time to take the necessary steps forward.  Now I'm at a stage where I'm committed to leap (leave the metropolitan city area, cut the mortgage in half, and work on personal projects and maybe do some remote freelance to pay the bills).  But before I leap, I'm taking a look to asses the situation to make sure I land right where I'm supposed to...

... if that made any sense.

I guess the short way of saying it is; I'm just trying to absorb as much data as possible before locking in the escape plan.