Author Topic: Foundation for a Shipping Container  (Read 750 times)

Offline racer038

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Foundation for a Shipping Container
« on: March 07, 2020, 06:22:16 AM »
A local supplier of conex type shipping containers has dropped his price.  I have found a local wrecker company that has transported the 20 ft. containers for a reasonable fee.  My reading on the subject tells me there are inconsistent thoughts on how to set these up regarding a foundation / pad / footer.  Does anyone have hands on experience of the right was or the wrong way to set these permanent.  Do you provide ventilation under the container and if so....how?  How to keep varmints from setting up?   This container will be set in a wooded area on a remote location and will be used primarily for storage.

Offline Stwood

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Re: Foundation for a Shipping Container
« Reply #1 on: March 07, 2020, 08:08:21 AM »
No hands on experience, but with a 20' I would think 4 big concrete pads would suffice. Soil depending, go deep, 3-4'.
Sit it low, 3-4" off the ground, then you could attach either fence wire or sheet tin to the lower edges after digging down into the soil about a foot and refilling that trench.
A barrier from digging under

Offline richardr

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Re: Foundation for a Shipping Container
« Reply #2 on: March 27, 2020, 07:34:40 PM »
They're designed to rest and support weight on their corners, so you can get away with just four small pads or piers.  Seconding the concern of things living under it. I've seen vids of people tipping them on their long side and thoroughly coating them with roof tar products before just setting them in full ground contact. And putting a skimpy sloped shed-type roof on them seems to really extend their lives and keep their interior temps down in summer.
piers or small footings give you a chance to readily make it completely level. If you don't have the machinery to hoist and move it around, you could get it positioned where you want it then jack and crib it until you have enough room to dig and set concrete footers and shoot a level so the container is full level when it's lowered onto the pads.