Armory, Self Defense, And EDC > Firearms Training

Chemsoldier's Pistol Training Log

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Chemsoldier:
So, I am a pretty fair shot with a pistol.  However, I really like firearms.  My knowledge level about the industry and other academic knowledge is higher than my skill level.  My knowledge of the training industry and desire to take a wide variety of courses is high.  However to take those courses would be a bit of an affectation, I could get better than I am now through solo practice.  I am interested in pistol customization and optimization, however I do not yet have the skill to wring the max capability from my mostly stock pistols.

In 2018 that changes!  I have started using Claude Werner's (https://tacticalprofessor.wordpress.com/) Pistol Practice Program, which is a collection of 50 round range sessions to build pistol skills.  I have also started dry firing every day, short sessions of maybe 25-50 trigger presses. I am trying to get to the range at least weekly.  With the 50 round routines I can get in and out in 30-45 minutes so hopefully that will keep me going.  Already I have exercises with the military on the horizon that will interrupt it, but everything has to start somewhere.

I am going to use this as a way to keep track of it all.  I got the idea from Pistol-forum.com who has an entire section of people's training logs for pistol training.

Goals:
-Consistently shoot the pistol with both eyes open (yeah, one of my oldest bad pistol habits)
Shoot Expert in IDPA
-Complete Claude Werner's PPP Baseline test clean with all 10/Xs
-Complete the FAST (Fundamentals of Accuracy and Speed Test) under 7 seconds 2 out of 3 runs
-Shoot Expert in Stock Service Pistol (SSP) on the IDPA classifier (currently unclassified, though I suspect I will be on the lower end of Sharpshooter, the tier below Expert)
-Dry fire daily

So we will see how this will go.  I am the world's worst diarist. 

ID_Joker:
Sounds like a good plan!  I have started doing some work in the same vein, but unfortunately, not so structured.  I probably need to steal some of your ideas.  I've been pretty good about getting dry fire in 5-6 times per week, but not as good about getting to the range and not as good about structuring my range sessions for maximum training benefit.

Chemsoldier:
So the next few posts might be a mix of “What did I do today” and some background information.

The Gun



For the last three years I have been carrying one or another Generation 3 Glock Model 19 (midsized, 15 round capacity).  I have had a few minor modifications that have now become standard for me and my guns.

-Ameriglo CAP sights.  Instead of a ball of glowy stuff on the front sight blade as with most night sights, the whole front sight blade is filled with glowy stuff. Unlike the standard sights, these allow me to see a little bit of daylight inside the rear sight notch on each side of the front sight blade.  I like that.  The notch is plain black instead of the standard white U-Shaped outline on the rear sight.

Standard Glock Sights:


CAPs:




-I added the Vicker’s Tango Down magazine release.  It is nothing special, its just a mag release that is a little higher profile than the stock one, and a little lower profile than the factory extended mag release.  Having run through all three release types, this one seems best for getting a good stab with my firing thumb and not snagging on anything.  This modification is awesome in the Gen 1-3, it is not needed in the Gen 4-5 guns since they redesigned the mag release.

-The Vicker’s magazine release.  It’s a little easier to get a thumb on than the stock one, but not as likely to be inadvertently activated by a high hand grip as the factory competition mag release.
The last two are such hard to see changes that I will not bother with pics.  You will feel the difference if you use them, it doesn't look like much otherwise.

Holster: I carry in a Galco Summer Special style holster. It is a leather, inside the waistband holster that rides on my right hip at about the 3:30 to 4 o’clock position.   



Today:
Basic Dry Fire Routine:
5 trigger presses at a spot target (fine aiming point)
5 trigger presses, presentation from low ready to a silhouette target
5 trigger presses, presentation from high compressed ready to a silhouette target
5 trigger presses, presentation from the holster to a silhouette target
5 trigger presses at a spot target (fine aiming point)

This is my basic routine that I try to do no less than three times a week and is my lowest common denominator.  If I have had the day from hell, everything has fallen apart, this is my minimum.  The focus is on doing it right, not speed.  Focusing hard on the front sight, utilizing follow through and "calling my shot" to ensure I know if the sights moved right before the trigger snapped.

I know, nothing fancy.  Most folks have heard of the 10,000 reps or 10,000 hours of dedicated practice to really master something.  That is likely true, but with the large suite of skills needed in life, there is also evidence that how recently you have executed a skill helps with performance as well.  As Tom Givens of Rangemaster is reported to have said, "When you last practiced is more important than how much you last practiced."

So that is the method I am trying to work on this year.  Instead of having weeks or months between range sessions and no dry fire, I want to keep myself no more than 24 hours from my last properly performed trigger press.

Chemsoldier:

--- Quote from: Chemsoldier on January 02, 2018, 05:40:18 PM ---
I know, nothing fancy.  Most folks have heard of the 10,000 reps or 10,000 hours of dedicated practice to really master something.  That is likely true, but with the large suite of skills needed in life, there is also evidence that how recently you have executed a skill helps with performance as well.  As Tom Givens of Rangemaster is reported to have said, "When you last practiced is more important than how much you last practiced."

So that is the method I am trying to work on this year.  Instead of having weeks or months between range sessions and no dry fire, I want to keep myself no more than 24 hours from my last properly performed trigger press.

--- End quote ---
Its also worth pointing out that if you do 25 trigger presses a day for a few years, you will hit those 10,000 reps.

Ms. Albatross:

--- Quote from: Chemsoldier on December 30, 2017, 08:58:56 AM ---  I have started using Claude Werner's (https://tacticalprofessor.wordpress.com/) Pistol Practice Program,

--- End quote ---

Sadly, it doesn't seem to be available for sale anymore.

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