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Tai chi options

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Papijoe:
I recently messed up my knee bad enough to require surgery and am currently halfway through a 12 week recovery period before I can start "light duty" and it will probably be a year before I can kick a bag again. Before I walked to freedom I had gotten to Choban in Tang Soo Do, but haven't found a good dojang since moving.

I've started looking into Tai Chi. Since I still need to keep the knee immobilized I've started learning a modified 24 forms.

Given my long recovery cycle I was wondering if anyone had experience with the more esoteric versions of Tai Chi Chuan. I'm interested in Yang Lu Chan style, as well as related Chinese arts like Hsing-I, Bugua, and internal striking. Any feedback appreciated!

atherts:
I've done a few different styles of Tai Chi (Yang, Chen, Wu...). All of the styles have pretty much the same focus of relaxed intent and would be good for your knees to build strength. It is a martial art and quite effective when taught correctly. Some instructors are more martial in their teaching which adds depth to the training. Many non Chinese instructors don't know the martial applications (tofu chi is best to avoid).

I found the key to keeping your knees intact in any martial art, especially Tai Chi is to keep the knee aligned with the foot and not to extend your knee past your toes. If you get out of alignment and twist your foot or knee, you stand a good chance of tearing up your knee. Extending your knee past your toes, even if aligned will put a huge amount of stress on your knee. Don't let your knee collapse in or out or twist when doing the form.
Sink your hips, tuck in your butt somewhat, but don't add tension.
Until you build up the muscles used in Tai Chi, you will introduce some tightness or tension. Just stay relaxed and it will come over time. Keep your shoulders and elbows down or the tension will spread. My teacher always said relax and go lower and slower.

It is probably best to avoid Bagua until your knees get stronger, it is inherently twisting. Hsing-I is more linear, but requires more strength. I'd recommend Yang to start, and the 24 is a good entry point.

That's my .02 cents after years of many martial arts.

surfivor:

 There is what I would consider a world renown teacher who has been on the cover of Tai Chi magazine out of Newton Ma. I can send you more info.

 Tai Chi would be the least stressful on the knees as anything assuming your condition would allow it

Papijoe:

--- Quote from: atherts on October 31, 2017, 09:09:21 AM ---tofu chi is best to avoid

--- End quote ---
LOL!

Thanks, this is very helpful! I'll stick to the basic 24 movements until my knee is stronger, I'm pretty fired up to explore the fighting and internal aspects of the style, of which I was pretty ignorant. This has kind of been a silver lining to the cloud of the injury.

 

Papijoe:

--- Quote from: surfivor on October 31, 2017, 01:29:49 PM --- There is what I would consider a world renown teacher who has been on the cover of Tai Chi magazine out of Newton Ma. I can send you more info.

 Tai Chi would be the least stressful on the knees as anything assuming your condition would allow it

--- End quote ---

My profile is out of date I've "walked to freedom", now in the Hampton Roads area of VA. There is a lot of Okinawan, TKD, and BJJ around here because of Navy population but I've only found one Tai Chi teacher who I believe is Chen style.

I'll probably work off of videos for now.

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