Author Topic: AAR - Tactical Response - Fighting Pistol - Bastrop TX - March 7/8, 2009  (Read 20530 times)

Offline Halffast

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Well, day one is done and all I can say is that this class is KICK ASS!!!!!!!!!!!!  I learned more about shooting a pistol today than in all of the many years I've been a firearm enthusiast.  I'm off to do my homework and I can't wait for tomorrow.  I'll do a full AAR early next week.

James Yeager

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AAR - Tactical Response - Fighting Pistol - Bastrop TX - March 7/8, 2009
« Reply #1 on: March 07, 2009, 07:57:20 PM »

















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Offline BigDanInTX

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Today's class was an eye-opener for myself and I believe for many others.

Today we were taught by James, Allen, and Brian. I really appreciate all they taught us today.

This was the first pistol class I have ever been to aside from my CHL "class" 4 years ago. The fact that we worked from the ground-up was not discouraging, in fact every new thing we learned was a base for what we learned next.

Personally, my grip was crap, so I was quickly straightened out and the difference spoke for itself. I just finished the Night One "homework" (Dry-Fire practice and reading). I had read about dry-fire in the past and it seemed like something neat, but no true plan was really outlined, so I tried a few and didn't really think much of it. The way it's described in the course guide really did make a great difference. I was having issues reholstering today (keep head up, keep head up). I quite often would get it with no problem, but every now and again, I'd need to find it with my thumb before I did. By the time I finished my 15 minutes of dry-fire, tap-rack-bang, I was reholstering right away without even thinking about it. There's no pressure of hitting within the box, merely focusing on draw, presentation, grip (FREAKIN' GRIP!), front sight, smooth trigger pull. No bang, no target, just you and the pistol getting into that Zen state.

I'm looking forward to tomorrow (yes, even with the three-hour lecture...now that I've read the topics).

On a side note, I read several posts that James said you should do nothing different from what you do every day. If it rains and you don't use rain gear on a normal basis, you should train without it. I get that now. That is why I chose to wear shorts today. It sucks doing 360 scans on your knees, but here in Texas, I'm in shorts alot when I'm not at work. So, I thought it best to see what it was like. Tomorrow, jeans are in order because when I'm not in shorts, I'm in jeans.

Oh, and a note for anyone finding this who hasn't taken a class...don't forget the sunscreen! It was cloudy almost all day and while I'm not seriously burnt or anything, I'll definitely be feeling the sun on me tomorrow.

Thanks again, James, Allen, and Brian. See you guys bright and early (and on Daylight Savings morning, minus one hour of sleep!!).

Oh, and yeah...I just couldn't resist... ;-]


I'll be getting a group shot of the TSP'ers out there tomorrow.  So much was going on today that I forgot.
We had James (of course), myself, phil_in_cs, TXChikk, and Halffast.  Did I miss anyone?

EDIT: Toned down a couple of things.  This isn't GOTX.  ;-]
« Last Edit: March 07, 2009, 11:02:20 PM by BigDanInTX »

James Yeager

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James Yeager

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I'll be getting a group shot of the TSP'ers out there tomorrow. 



TXChikk, phil_in_cs, BigDanInTX, James Yeager (me), Halffast, Sugar Sand (aka"Zippo")
« Last Edit: March 08, 2009, 07:34:04 PM by James Yeager »

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 Well Fighting Pistol has concluded. It was a REALLY good group of folks and it was my distinct pleasure to meet all of the Survival Podcasters that came to train. Forum members should understand that your representatives were on time, safe, accurate, disciplined, focused, determined and had a terrific sense of humor!

i would glad to have these folks on my side when things were bad!

Offline BigDanInTX

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On the way home today, I had plenty of time to digest what I had learned today and came to some striking realizations. What follows below are some generalizations about the class and does not cover every aspect, merely my foggy recollection of what I learned. There will be omissions, please forgive them. I wanted to include them to make a point. I put that point in bold, so if you want to, just read the bolded text in the next two paragraphs to sum it up.

Day 1 of Fighting Pistol is essentially unlearning the crap you have "learned" before and starting over. You are taught how to hold the pistol, how to draw, how to load, how to aim, how to pull the trigger, how to move off the line of fire, how to reload, how to perform malfunction drills, how to be aware of other threats around you aside from the one you just drilled holes into, how to fire from kneeling and prone positions. Day 1 of Fighting Pistol taught me how to shoot.

In Day 2 of Fighting Pistol, you are taught the mindset of things, the legal aspects, the use of force, the way in which you are constantly processing the stimuli around you, the condition of your alertness, then (moving on to post-lecture) you begin to focus on smooth trigger control and allowing the gun to go off instead of making it go off, firing from a position where you have the attacker right on you and backing away (with either two hands or with a hand protecting yourself and with your strong hand), the difference between concealment and cover, how to get to a concealed position, and firing from concealment. Day 2 of Fighting Pistol taught me how to DEFEND MYSELF.

Day two may build on the essentials learned in day one, but it really clicked for me when I was firing from retention. I have an attacker in my face and I am not just aiming at boxes anymore. I have sound concussion, gases, gunpowder being blasted in my face. I am putting rounds (for me) right at neck level and a little below. If this is a real human, I am not just hitting the chest. If this is a real human, I am not just hitting the chest. I am close enough that I am almost putting the gun right on his throat!  To me, this is the point where I am no longer shooting paper.  What I am doing is preparing for the day that I may need these skills.  I am no longer just learning to shoot the pistol, I am learning to protect myself and innocents around me (among those could be my wife or my two sons). At this point, something clicked in my head and made a difference. No longer was I just doing drills and learning. Yes, I was learning, but there was more. This "more-ness" (if you will allow the word) is not something I can define or quantify. It is something that you will truly have to do yourself to truly understand.

I implore you. I compel you. I beg you...

If you do nothing more, take this class. Learn the skills. Practice them on your own.

I assure you. You will be wanting more. And, like me, you will have a strong desire to sign up for more classes.

I am attending Advanced Fighting Pistol for the next two days. I am more sore than I have been in a long time, I am tired and I hurt just about everywhere. I knew it would be difficult, both mentally and physically and it definitely delivered! I must tell you though, after the motivation and inspiration I stumbled upon today, I don't care how tired I am, how sore I am, or how much I hurt. I have been given the opportunity of a lifetime to capitalize on what has become available to me. I plan to make good on my commitment and get as much from the Advanced class as I did from the first.

Time to hydrate!! (Some more...) ;-]
i would glad to have these folks on my side when things were bad!
As would I!!  =-D
« Last Edit: March 08, 2009, 08:39:54 PM by BigDanInTX »

Offline phil_in_cs

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I don't have my full AAR finished yet, but I want to say that TxChikk was AWESOME. Unlike me, she didn't show up with a load of bad habits. She listened to James, Allen, and Brian, did what they said, was was shooting very, very well by Sunday afternoon. There were 3 other very new shooters, one who had just bought a pistol and had never fired it, and all were out performing me on many drills since they did as instructed and didn't have bad habits to break.

The only thing I was wanting to see and didn't was James fulfilling his promise to put BigDan in a headlock.

Offline phil_in_cs

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Speaking of bad habits: me doing it wrong



and the proper method.


Offline TXChikk

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Fighting Pistol class from Tactical Response
Bastrop, Texas March 7-8 2009
Instructors: James, Allen & Brian

Bar none Fighting Pistol is the best thing I ever participated in. I almost backed out but listened to my parents and James and decided to attend, best choice I ever made. The number one objective for me was to gain confidence in myself and learn how to properly and effectively handle a weapon. Fighting Pistol delivered.

There are so many components to this class I can expound on and each one deserves its own review but for the sake of making this review readable I’ll stick to what has impacted me the most. Self confidence, learning how to fight with a gun and practice, practice, practice. As a female I strongly recommend every female take Fighting Pistol. Don’t think about what you don’t know, Tactical Response will fix that. Don’t think about what you do know, Tactical Response will change that, in a very enlightening way to your benefit. Don’t think about your lack of self-confidence, Tactical Response will change that too, and that is the single most valuable thing to me at this moment. I now know how to draw, grip and fight with a gun and I need to practice, often, daily, but if I do that without confidence then what’s the point? I now believe I can do everything I was taught effectively and over time after much practice I will not fail and neither will you.

I will admit I was intimidated by my perception of being the dumb female or uninitiated shooter but those perceptions were quickly dispelled by the professional, experienced instruction of James, Allen & Brian. I thought my gross inexperience and lack of any training would handicap me severely and leave me behind trying to catch up but my general ignorance worked heavily in my favor because I essentially started as a blank slate. Starting totally from scratch enabled me to learn correctly the first time the proper way to handle a weapon.

The key to learning and absorbing everything from Fighting Pistol is having an open mind and I’m so grateful I was able to be open to everything James, Allen and Brian had to say and demonstrate. These guys were very respectful to me and were effective in communicating how to correct my grip, trigger finger, tap, rack, scan and many other things to where I could absorb. It’s difficult to say which aspect of the class I benefited from the most because I benefited from everything.

These guys teach positive reinforcement by showing you only what they want you learn and once you get a concept down realizing on your own how ineffective your prior habits are is equally invaluable. On the surface how/where you wear your gun or how you hold (grip) your weapon may seem so basic but these things are more vital than one may initially realize. As a CHL holder I admit often for silly reasons I rarely carry my weapon. We women worry about things like appearance and convenience and those two things factored into my not wearing a weapon on my person. After participating in the weapon drawing lesson I quickly realized carrying my weapon in my purse is almost as ineffective as not having a weapon at all. Even a purse designed for carry in my mind is not good enough. If as a woman you insist on leaving your gun in your purse a designed carry purse is essential, don’t even consider any other carry method other than perhaps a fanny pack designed for carry and I personally wouldn’t recommend that unless you are ok with that fashion flaw.

Participating in Fighting Pistol has opened my mind to things I never considered. My world view and how I view myself in the world has changed dramatically in two days. Friday and Monday are worlds apart. Practice, practice, practice is essential if you want to ingrain the learning from Fighting Pistol and Tactical Response. This class or any class from Tactical Response is worth every penny, worth the time, worth the sweat and grime and the bruises (to body & ego). I guarantee you will feel the same.

Offline TXChikk

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I don't have my full AAR finished yet, but I want to say that TxChikk was AWESOME. Unlike me, she didn't show up with a load of bad habits. She listened to James, Allen, and Brian, did what they said, was was shooting very, very well by Sunday afternoon. There were 3 other very new shooters, one who had just bought a pistol and had never fired it, and all were out performing me on many drills since they did as instructed and didn't have bad habits to break.

The only thing I was wanting to see and didn't was James fulfilling his promise to put BigDan in a headlock.

Thank you Phil for your kind words :). I had the best time taking this class with you and the rest of the TSP folks. It was a pleasure to meet you and everyone else and I am really looking forward to the May shindig, this class helped cement my desire to attend.

I also look forward to calling everyone here my fellow warriors :), peace to all.

Offline phil_in_cs

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Fighting Pistol by Tactical Response, Bastrop Texas March 7th and 8th, 2009

The instructors for this class were James, Brian and Allen, and though there were 20 in the class we all got personal instruction and attention.  I have quite a bit of experience in small bore rifle and Service Rifle, but only started shooting pistols seriously about 18 months ago, shooting about 30 IDPA matches in 2008. The only instruction in pistol I’ve had was a short class from an IDPA Master Class shooter, and that class was about half shooting and half how to compete in IDPA.

I drove over to Bastrop from College Station with a couple friends, who post here at TxChikk and fitpro. I’d found out about the training on www.survivalpodcast.com. TxChikk was already signed up, and I convinced fitpro to come with me.

I also brought with me two bad habits that I knew about. First my grip is usually wrong on the draw and causes me to throw a shot or two until I realize my problem and change it. The grip Tactical Response teaches is the same one the IDPA folks have recommended. Secondly, I frequently slap the trigger. That’s very frustrating to me as my rifle trigger work is very good even on rapid fire with clunky triggers, but I’m having problems transferring that to the pistol. I received a lot of encouragement on that from Allen, soft but earnest cursing from Brian, and a lot of louder cursing from James to help me correct this.

We started the day working the basics of the draw, grip, sight picture, sight alignment, trigger control and so forth. I know from my rifle work that you can never be too good on the basics, and my bad habits quickly popped up and got some attention. When we started working on the various failure drills, we found another bad habit: when I get a click rather than bang, I usually rack it and try again, rather than doing the proper tap/rack/fight. I put a couple thousand rounds down range through a couple different Glocks in the past 18 months, and the only failures I’ve ever had were due to me failing to seat the mag properly. That makes it pretty odd to forget the tap, but I was consistently wrong and that’s something else I need to work on.

The biggest thing I got on day one didn’t involve shooting, but was the last three parts of the FAST (Fight, Assess, Scan, Top Off) idea. Shooting rifle and pistol matches has gotten me into serious tunnel vision. The idea that after I’m sure I’ve got the guy I know about, I need to turn around and look for his buddies, really resonated with me. It seems like such an obvious thing in retrospect, but really helped shift my mindset away from “game/sport” to “living or dying”.

The discussion at the beginning of day two finished driving this point home. While I’ve thought of many of these issues, and discussed them with friends, James brought up many things I hadn’t thought of, and many subtle aspects of the legal, moral, and emotional issues surrounding the use of deadly force that I hadn’t thought of. With our large class, and men and women from various backgrounds, there was a good discussion on many of these ideas. The first weekend in March is late spring in Central Texas, and we had a wonderful warm but not too hot Sunday morning for the discussion.

The afternoon started with my biggest new practice tool, and that’s Allen’s Dot Drill. There’s an indoor range near my office, but I never shoot there as they don’t allow drawing, moving, rapid fire, etc. The Dot Drill is what I need to fix my trigger issues, and can be done at the indoor range during my lunch hour. That’s going to be my biggest live fire drill over the next few months.

The remaining drills we ran are very much like what we shoot in IDPA; shooting while moving, getting to cover, and slicing the pie to get around the corner to the target. There was a huge difference in my approach though; rather than thinking “If I don’t do a pretty good job on this, my time will suck and guys will give me shit” my mindset was “If I don’t do this perfectly, I or someone I love is going to get killed.”

I had a new (less than a week old) G19 that I’d put Big Dots on. I didn’t really see the big advantage with the Big dots until we started the movement drills, but once I was moving I saw how much better they are than the TFO I have on my G34. On day one, I was using my IWB Comptac MTAC. That worked very well for concealment, and drawing, but I had major issues trying to reholster without looking down. After I got home on Saturday night, I worked on that for about 10 minutes trying to get it adjusted before deciding to just run my normal Comptac belt holster. I wanted to concentrate on what the instructors were telling me rather than screwing with my equipment. My only other gear comment was you really need a camelback type rig. I had one, and the folks that didn’t spent a lot of time looking for their water bottles when they should have been listening to the instructors.

I am kicking myself for not getting my schedule arranged to take a couple days off so I could take the Advanced class being taught there today and tomorrow.  I will be at the Fighting Rifle class at that range in September, and will work at getting my resources in line to take the Advanced Rifle class as well. I’ve shown a couple co-workers the photos James took, and I think I have one of them convinced to join me in the Fighting Rifle class.  TxChikk is going to help me convince my wife to take the pistol class if they make another stop in this area next year. She had too many of the intimidation factors TxChikk mentioned to come out to the class.

I’ve been shooting a long time, and this was the best $450 I’ve ever spent.



Offline acman145acp

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I don't feel up to writing a whole course review right now (but i will)  i'm still sick.

I just wanted to go ahead and call James a fxxxr for posting the Michael Jordan picture of me and calling me sugar sand.

I apologize to the other people at the class if i seemed antisocial wasn't my intention i was just really sick.......

I've been shooting a relatively long time ~34yrs and i'm glad i went to this class when i get to take advanced fighting pistol i hope to prove to them
that i wasn't one of the people who paid money to show them how i shoot  ;)

James may come off "gruff or opinionated" to some but he is an excellent instructor he not only knows how to do the things he's teaching but he knows how to teach it
that's something everyone can't do.

He knew i was sick and made sure to remind me personally to keep hydrated and see how i was doing.

BTW James am i mistaken or did that 1911 run without malfunction the whole class?  ;D

Offline TXChikk

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BTW James am i mistaken or did that 1911 run without malfunction the whole class?  ;D

that's more than I can say  ;D ....... needless to say I am in the market for a G19

Sorry you're sick :(. I personally didn't think you were antisocial at all, you seemed ok and I'm astounded you held up the way you did being sick. It was a pleasure to meet you and I hope you're better soon.

James Yeager

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The only thing I was wanting to see and didn't was James fulfilling his promise to put BigDan in a headlock.

No headlock but I did have him in a chokehold today!  ;D

James Yeager

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I don't feel up to writing a whole course review right now (but i will)  i'm still sick.

Want me to call a WAAAmbulance?

Quote
I just wanted to go ahead and call James a fxxxr for posting the Michael Jordan picture of me and calling me sugar sand.

My pleasure.

Quote
I apologize to the other people at the class if i seemed antisocial wasn't my intention i was just really sick.......

...and you smelled bad!

Quote
I've been shooting a relatively long time ~34yrs...

We couldn't tell.

Quote
James may come off "gruff or opinionated" to some but he is an excellent instructor he not only knows how to do the things he's teaching but he knows how to teach it
that's something everyone can't do.

NOBODY talks about how funny my jokes are! I should be doing comedy!

Quote
He knew i was sick and made sure to remind me personally to keep hydrated and see how i was doing.
I also offered to shoot you but Halffast had seniority.

Quote
BTW James am i mistaken or did that 1911 run without malfunction the whole class?  ;D

You are mistaken....although they were most likely operator induced.


Offline CBMS

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Hot dang I am jealous of you guys. Awesome Guys!
Who is on the Mobile crew when you come to the North Country?
I Would love to take a course with you guys sometime up here!
« Last Edit: March 09, 2009, 09:27:54 PM by CBMS »

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Bar none Fighting Pistol is the best thing I ever participated in.

That is POWERFUL.

Thank you!

Offline Halffast

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Tactical Response Fighting Pistol Course Review

On the weekend of March 7th and 8th, 2009, I had the distinct pleasure to take Tactical Response’s (www.TacticalResponse.com) Fighting Pistol Class.  It was held in Bastrop, Texas and was taught by James Yeager, the founder of Tactical Response.  Assisting James were two other instructors, Allen Webb and Brian “The Aussie”.  The purpose of this class, as stated on the Tactical Response website is not to just learn to shoot, but to learn how to fight with a pistol. Believe me, this course delivers!

I could go step by step through the things we did and learned over the two days, but I’m not going to.  I know there are many great reviews about this course that can do that better than I ever could.  You can read many of them at www.GetOffTheX.com .  What I want to share with you are my personal achievements with a pistol during this class and why this class helped me to accomplish them. 

While I don’t want to bore you with a bunch of boring crap, I need to tell you a little about myself so that you will know where I am coming from.  I have been shooting for almost 30 years.  I enjoy it immensely, but I have no natural talent for it.  I was before this class, at best, a mediocre shooter.

I have a full time job that pays the bills, but I am also a part time martial arts instructor.  I teach karate mostly to kids, but I have adult students as well.  I do it for two reasons.  First, it gives me money to buy guns, ammo, and training.  However, the main reason I do it is because I love to teach.  To see the look in a child’s eyes when he begins to believe in himself is a reward that money cannot buy.  Because of this, I am always looking at how others teach what they do, whether it’s karate or plumbing, to pick up methods and techniques that I can use in my classes.  In school, work, the martial arts, and even a few shooting schools, I have observed hundreds of instructors.  Some I learned a metric ton from and others taught me very little except for perhaps what not to do.  In a nutshell, I am a student of how others teach.

I tell you all of this to put into perspective this statement.  The Tactical Response instructors are among the best I have ever seen.  They are professional, knowledgeable, and caring. They not only know how to “do”, they know how to teach.  While it might seem that the ability to teach would be a common quality in instructors, I can assure you that it is not. The Tactical Response crew understands how we learn and they structure their lessons so that you are able to absorb the most information in the shortest amount of time.  They know how to read the students and tailor the coaching to make sure that each individual is grasping the concepts and improving no matter the level they are at.  Only the best of the best can do this.

We had about 20 students in our class.  It was quite an eclectic group.  One gentleman had purchased his first gun that week.  Some had never had any instruction, while others were very experienced shooters.  Two of the students were women who were very apprehensive about taking a class.  Several of the guys had taken this course before.  Some were military personnel.  One was a teenager and another was as he put it, “Older than dirt.”

Every single one of us learned a tremendous amount in this class.  Even the guys who had taken it before said they learned a lot.  One of them told me he though he learned more the second time because he didn’t need to worry about improving his shooting as much.  The ladies told me they were at ease almost immediately once the class started.  I also noticed that the girls were the best students in the class.  I wasn’t surprised, as I have noticed in the martial arts that women are typically better pupils than men.  The brand new shooter was performing on par with everyone else by the end of the class.  Everyone I talked to walked away from this class not just a little better, but vastly improved.

I don’t know if I have ever learned so much in so little time.  Allen fixed my grip in the first few minutes of class.  I had been taught this grip two times before, but he noticed that I wasn’t quite doing it correctly.  The instructors I had in the two classes I took before hadn’t noticed.  In fact, in the last class I took, they total wrecked my confidence in my shooting ability.  I came out of that class a worse shot than when I started.

My shooting improved dramatically with only this seemingly insignificant change in my grip.  However, these guys weren’t through with me yet.  I had so many little problems that they noticed that no one ever had.  I also had a big problem with trigger control that no one had ever been able to fix.  These guys did.  On the second day of class I was putting five shots on a one-inch dot.  If anyone had told me I would have been shooting that good, I wouldn’t have believed it.  All of a sudden, I became the kid that was beginning to believe in himself.  My shooting ability soared and with it my self-confidence.

But the vast improvement in my marksmanship wasn’t all I experienced.  I learned to move and shoot, to shoot from retention, and to shoot from a multitude of positions.  We practiced clearing malfunctions, scanning for multiple assailants, drawing, reloading, and holstering our pistols while keeping our heads up where we can see what is happening.  We learned about the mindset and tactics it takes to win a gunfight.  We also heard about the legal, moral, and psychological effects of being in a shooting.  I learned more in two days than I would have thought possible.

I believe that anyone at any skill level who wants to learn can benefit from this class.  I will be taking my son and daughter next year.  Whether you’ve never had any training or are a veteran shooter, are a man or a woman, had a bad experience with another school, or are just plain scared of being embarrassed in front of others, this is the class for you. It might even save your life! 

It has been a long, long time since I have had as much fun and achieved so much as I did in the Fighting Pistol class.  It has not only given me the skills and confidence that I can defend myself and others with my pistol, it has also renewed my desire to improve my own teaching skills.

Thanks James, Allen, and Brian.  Words just cannot tell you how much I appreciate you all.  You will be seeing a lot more of me!  That’s not a threat…it’s a promise.

David Crawford

PS - I also want to make two other small points.  First, I thought I would need time after I took Fighting Pistol to work on the skills I learned before I took Advanced Fighting Pistol.  That assumption was wrong.  Don’t be afraid to take the classes back to back. 

Second, the top item on the gear list for all of the Tactical Response classes is One (1) Open Mind.  There is a reason it is listed first.  As an instructor in another field, I can tell you that how open you are to listening and trying what is being taught is directly proportional to how much you will learn.  My primary martial arts instructor has an old saying…“When the student is ready, the teacher will appear.”






 

Offline BigDanInTX

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Great review, Halffast!!  +1,000,000  ;-]

Offline phil_in_cs

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PS - I also want to make two other small points.  First, I thought I would need time after I took Fighting Pistol to work on the skills I learned before I took Advanced Fighting Pistol.  That assumption was wrong.  Don’t be afraid to take the classes back to back. 

I made that mistake too, and won't make it again for fighting rifle. I've gotten my ducks in a row so I can be there all four days, even if I have to burn into my match ammo due to trouble finding enough .223.

James Yeager

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I made that mistake too, and won't make it again for fighting rifle. I've gotten my ducks in a row so I can be there all four days, even if I have to burn into my match ammo due to trouble finding enough .223.

We have ammo and you have time.

Offline phil_in_cs

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We have ammo and you have time.

I'm getting it done. After reading BigDan's AAR for Advanced Fighting Pistol, there's no way I'm missing either rifle class.


James Yeager

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I'm getting it done. After reading BigDan's AAR for Advanced Fighting Pistol, there's no way I'm missing either rifle class.



We step it up a notch in the rifle classes.  ;D

Offline BigDanInTX

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From today to August 1st (plenty of time to be signed up/deposit paid half-way/paid off), we have about 20 weeks until the class.  That means you only need to save $50 a week to attend.  That is VERY do-able.  ;-]

Offline phil_in_cs

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From today to August 1st (plenty of time to be signed up/deposit paid half-way/paid off), we have about 20 weeks until the class.  That means you only need to save $50 a week to attend.  That is VERY do-able.  ;-]

Plus ammo, which has gotten outrageous recently :(
I've a lot of steel case, but that won't run well once the rifle gets hot. I will make this happen if I have to freaking sell plasma.

Offline BigDanInTX

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Plus ammo, indeed...  Okay, so let's call it $75-100 per week?  I still think that's do-able.

Offline phil_in_cs

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Plus ammo, indeed...  Okay, so let's call it $75-100 per week?  I still think that's do-able.

I will be there, big guy. I have no idea where the $100/week is going to come from, but I will figure that out as I go along.

Offline acman145acp

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Tactical Response “Fighting Pistol” Review
James, Allen and fucking Brian were the instructors.
    
Why I wanted to take this class. I’ve always been into guns and while it sometimes doesn’t look like it I’ve been shooting for 34~yrs. I was doing research looking for a place that taught gun fighting skills. While doing research on where I wanted to take a class from I read every online review I could find. One of the reviews I read about “Fighting Pistol” was a student who said he was scared in class breaking the “180 rule” was just beyond his comprehension I guess. I knew that was the class for me.

The gun handling skills taught and the explanation of why they are to be performed that way were logical and well thought out in my opinion.  Not once was I thinking that doesn’t sound like a good idea. I took a lot of good stuff away from this. From now on I will handle my pistol one way and practice the methods I learned in this class.

While this wasn’t really a marksmanship class it was covered and the Allen dot drill is something I will incorporate. I have serious issues some days with trigger control and I believe this will help.

The lecture about mindset, situational awareness and keeping your life in order was just fucking outstanding. I don’t think I know anyone who wouldn’t benefit from this part of the class. While I’m personally good with the mindset and the keeping my life’s business in order I’m often lax with situational awareness. That’s something I’m going to strive to correct.
It’s truly a shame that every new shooter doesn’t get to start out with this class.


Btw Saturday while we were at class a misunderstood youth brandished a pistol at one of my coworkers this happened in a small town of about 30k people stay vigilant folks

And you wankers need to change my name back too that way people will know who they are mad at on every forum i post on 8)