Author Topic: .22lr for Harvesting Game Animals  (Read 28267 times)

nelson96

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.22lr for Harvesting Game Animals
« on: March 04, 2014, 11:47:50 PM »
I always hear people saying stuff like "the .22lr will take just about ANY game animal if the shot is placed correctly". . .  So if that's true about the .22 rimfire, you ever wonder why more game hunters (ie deer hunters) don’t use the .22 centerfire cartridges like .22 Hornet, .223 WSSM, .218 Bee, .222 Remington, .223 Remington, .22-250 Remington, .220 Swift, .219 Zipper, .220 Rocket, .222 Rem. Magnum, .224 Weatherby, and .225 Winchester?  They’re all legal to hunt with in most states.

The rifles cost less to buy, weigh a lot less, have a ton less recoil, and can cost much less to shoot than what are traditionally used.  Those are all pretty desired traits for a hunter.

I've known a few that use calibers like the .223 and .22-250 Remington for deer, but why is it so rare compared to the masses using larger calibers?  Is this a regional thing and I am just unaware?  Even the TSP posts from new and/or experienced hunters talk about buying a .243 or larger for hunting.

BE NICE IF YOU REPLY, MAYBE WE CAN ALL LEARN SOMETHING FROM THE POSTS. . .  In all honesty I know the answer.  Well, I have an opinion on the answer, and I promise to be nice.  :)

nelson96

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Re: .22lr for Harvesting Game Animals
« Reply #1 on: March 05, 2014, 12:30:35 AM »
A few things to consider on the argument for the utility of the .22lr, other than plinking or for animals under about 7 pounds. . . .
  • The bullet has 1/3 less grains, or less, than the most common game hunting calibers
  • The velocity is half that of the most common game hunting calibers, even shot from a longer barrel than most common .22lr's (ie 10/22). . .  Barrel length does matter
  • Relatively poor ballistic coefficient
  • The sectional density is much lower than more common game hunting calibers
  • Has very low muzzle energy compared to more common game hunting calibers
  • Wind plays hell on it
  • Game animals aren't always sleeping in the backyard of your house
  • Game animals aren't always standing still
  • Game animals aren't always standing at the correct angle for an optimum shot
  • Game animals are seldom 25 yards away, or closer (in my experience out west)
  • Game animals are wounded and lost every season, all over the world, with calibers much better suited for game animals
  • Perfect shot placement on a hunt (not at the range) isn't as easy as you might think
  • The above mentioned could play hell on even a succesful head shot, all things considered, and all things should be considered if your life is going to depend on it
.

Offline oktheniknow

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Re: .22lr for Harvesting Game Animals
« Reply #2 on: March 05, 2014, 09:06:09 AM »
Also, it's hard as hell to find ammo. For small animals (squirrels) I just use pellet guns. Works like a charm and ammo is unlimited.

Offline David in MN

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Re: .22lr for Harvesting Game Animals
« Reply #3 on: March 05, 2014, 10:18:02 AM »
It's actually a really good question. I've got some thoughts...

1) Most hunters I know are a little gear crazy. They "need" a 300 Win mag for some reason and a scope zeroed out to 400 yards even though none of them seems to have taken an animal from more than 75. I've a funny feeling my Mosin is overqualified for 99% of the hunting in America. (I'm an archery guy, though.)

2) It's new. The (fill in the blank) was grandpa's round and it's always worked.

3) There has been and continues to be a magic halo on a .30 round. Right or wrong, it just seems to be a shooter's choice in rifles.

4) .22 caliber ammo does not deform predictably or consistently. Any vet will tell you about the strange things a .223 does in the human body.

5) It might be enough to punch a hole through an animal but it lacks the cavitation and resulting traumatic damage to the target. That's why so much work has been put into arrowheads in recent years. Without cavitation you need a larger wound channel. .22s lack both.

There's my thoughts. A little superstition, a little science. My neighbor hunts deer with a .223 and I know it can be done. I'd love to hear others' thoughts.

nelson96

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Re: .22lr for Harvesting Game Animals
« Reply #4 on: March 05, 2014, 10:41:35 AM »
1) Most hunters I know are a little gear crazy. They "need" a 300 Win mag for some reason and a scope zeroed out to 400 yards

Most in my circles are experienced in hunting with multiple calibers and though many of them are "gear crazy", there's much more to their decision in selected caliber than what's popular.  None of them hunt "game" animals with less than a .270

Any vet will tell you about the strange things a .223 does in the human body.

What do they say?  I know a lot of large animal vets, none of them have any idea what a .223 does to the human body, let alone an animal.

My neighbor hunts deer with a .223 and I know it can be done. I'd love to hear others' thoughts.

I'm curious then, what he would think about hunting with a .22lr?

Offline Mortblanc

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Re: .22lr for Harvesting Game Animals
« Reply #5 on: March 05, 2014, 10:46:27 AM »


The rifles cost less to buy, weigh a lot less, have a ton less recoil, and can cost much less to shoot than what are traditionally used.  Those are all pretty desired traits for a hunter.

I've known a few that use calibers like the .223 and .22-250 Remington for deer, but why is it so rare compared to the masses using larger calibers?  Is this a regional thing and I am just unaware?  Even the TSP posts from new and/or experienced hunters talk about buying a .243 or larger for hunting.


Good rifles cost about the same no matter what caliber you specify.  They generally all weigh the same based on action length, barrel contour and stock material.

I stay away from some of the small calibers due to an aversion to using any slug of less than 100 grains on medium sized game.  That is just a personal power floor I set for myself years ago.

Now after saying that I will admit that I took my very slight (70 pound) grand-daughter deer hunting last fall and placed a .223 in her hands for the occasion due to the light recoil from an equally light Single shot rifle.  However, I would not have allowed her to shoot a big buck or doe with that load.

If I am going to be restricted as to the number of guns I can own, either legally or financially, I would prefer to be over gunned at the bottom of the "need based scale" rather than under gunned in the mid range or top of the demand range.

I would rather have a .308 or 30-06 to use on 100 pound deer than be forced to hunt feral hogs or elk with a .223. 

nelson96

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Re: .22lr for Harvesting Game Animals
« Reply #6 on: March 05, 2014, 10:53:27 AM »
Good rifles cost about the same no matter what caliber you specify.  They generally all weigh the same based on action length, barrel contour and stock material.

I'll admit that was a bad argument.  It's been my experience though that the used market doesn't hold as well for the .22 calibers as other more traditional hunting calibers.  Unless you hold out for that limited market buyer looking for a range gun or varmit/predator piece.

As for weight, depends on how you define general I guess, but still splitting hairs.  My argument is more toward the effectiveness of the .22lr and it certainly weighs and costs less.

.
« Last Edit: March 05, 2014, 11:07:08 AM by nelson96 »

Offline David in MN

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Re: .22lr for Harvesting Game Animals
« Reply #7 on: March 05, 2014, 11:45:23 AM »
What do they say?  I know a lot of large animal vets, none of them have any idea what a .223 does to the human body, let alone an animal.

The stories on the .223 are vast. I've heard from Vietnam to Iraq about how that round keyholes on impact, disintegrates, enters a thigh and comes out a shoulder... you name it. One will say it's underpowered and the next swears it will rip off an arm if hit in the shoulder. It's got a reputation with a lot who have used it for being a little unpredictable.

The M16 was designed to repel communist human wave attacks in Eastern Europe at a range of sub 100 yards. The .223 was a balance of "just enough" stopping power while being lightweight enough to carry a lot of ammo. The rifle and round just weren't built for hunting. With changes to the barrel, ammo, tip, etc. it can be a small game rifle. But "just enough" to stop a man won't knock down an elk where it stands. A Glock 19 offers great self-defense against humans but I wouldn't hunt with it. Same thing.

Offline TheRetiredRancher

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Re: .22lr for Harvesting Game Animals
« Reply #8 on: March 05, 2014, 02:24:27 PM »
I have used the .22lr and have witnessed the .22 lr being used to kill animals from chipmonk size to 1 ton bulls.  I have personally made good one shot kills on Jack rabbits and cotton tails out to about 150 yards with an accurate gun.  The .22 lr makes a nice clean kill with a chest shot on the Jack rabbits even out to that range. Large animals are literaly a different breed.   The large animals were either sick animals being euthanized or slaughter steers being prepared to butcher.  Shots on those animals were at no more than 25 feet. Several of the slaughter steers were actualkly killed by my father with an old winchester semi-auto .22 short gallery rifle.  Even the .22 short has plenty of "power" to kill a 1,000 lb steer at 25 feet or less when the bullet is placed in exactly the right spot.  This means a head shot from directly in front of the animal with the animal's head tipped down slightly.  A bullet placed where the growth plates come together into kind of a point above the eyes can penetrate the skull, traverse the brain and sever the spinal cord.  The animal drops like a rock and hardly moves.  I once witnessd my older brother try to dispatch one for the first time (it was a right of passage for us boys) with a .22lr and miss that spot by 1/2".  The animal took off like a rocket, jumped a 5 foot fence and had to be dropped with a .30-30 to the lungs.  I have since euthanized or butchered several cattle, horses and goats, even one llama, and will testify that one perfect shot is all that you need.  One very slightly less than perfect shot and you have a wounded animal getting away very quickly.  I personally don't hunt anything larger than Jack rabbits with a .22 lr.  A .22 magnum is OK up to racoon or fox size.  I have a .32-20 Winchester that I use on Coyotes if they are close and I also use it in preference to the .22lr now for euthenasia as it does not penetrate much further than the .22lr and allows a small margin of error.  When euthenizing farm animals it always pays to minimize penetration as it usually has to be done wherever the animal is laying and the background may not be easy to clear of other animals, buildings and etc. as one would prefer.

As far as center fire .22's go the only one I have any real experience with is an old model 1899 savage in .22high power.  It was a cartridge that made a name for itself as one of the fastest cartidges in the world in 1912 and was touted for everything up to Lions and Tigers.  Then reality set in and people realized that the 70 grain bullet at 2800 fps was wounding alot more then it killed and Savage soon brought out the .250-3000 which was a good little deer rifle.  They then quit advertising the .22 hp as a deer round.  I think it is a great coyote rifle, and would be willing to use it on the local Cous whitetails if I had an extremely good shot,  But I own a .270 Win and it is even flatter shooting and has more than enough knock down power for anything found in the Southwest and why risk a wounded animal getting away to die in agony.

nelson96

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Re: .22lr for Harvesting Game Animals
« Reply #9 on: March 05, 2014, 05:00:05 PM »
Well said Rancher.

My butcher once made a bad shot at 20 feet on a steer of mine while eating he was eating grain.  The steer wasn't dispatched and took off tearing the gate off it's hinges with his head through and packed the gate off with him.  Down the field we went, but this time with his .30-.30

Offline MississippiJarhead

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Re: .22lr for Harvesting Game Animals
« Reply #10 on: March 05, 2014, 05:53:45 PM »
I've only known two adults that use less than a .270 for whitetail.

The first one is an old guy who not only suffered a heart attach and was medically retired from the fire department about 25 years ago but is also a really small guy. He says when he was younger he used a .30-'06 but switched to a .243 after his heart attack and realizing shot placement is more vital with it he has never lost a deer with that rifle.

The second was my stepdad who had never hunted whitetail with a rifle until he got a CZ 527 in .223. He alway used varmint loads and took neck shots. I got several of his rifles when he passed but that rifle went to my little sister who had also hunted quite a bit with it and had taken a very nice buck with it. That sweet little rifle has me hunting for a pair of them, in .223 and 7.62x39, of my own.

I personally wouldn't hunt whitetail on a regular basis with a .22 caliber center fire but my sons may start out on one. 7.62x39 is my current minimum power round for hunting but I haven't gotten a shot with my Mini-30, yet.

nelson96

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Re: .22lr for Harvesting Game Animals
« Reply #11 on: March 06, 2014, 12:43:10 AM »
My brother sent me a link to this article, which I found made so much sense that it was both worthy of passing on to this thread and hard to argue a single point (pro's & con's).

AND. . . .  Found in the FBI Academy Firearms Training Unit - Handgun Wounding Factors and Effectiveness. . . 

Quote
The factors governing incapacitation of the human target are many, and variable.  The actual destruction caused by any small arms projectile is too small in magnitude relative to the mass and complexity of the target.  if a bullet detroys about 2 ounces of tissue in its passage through the body, that represents 0.07 of one percent of the mass of a 180 pound man.  Unless the tissue destroyed is located within the critical areas of the central nervous system, it is physiologically insufficient to force incapacitation upon the unwilling target.  It may certainly prove to be lethal but a body count is no evidence of incapacitation.  Probably more people in this country have been killed by .22 rimfires than all other calibers combined, which, based on body count, would compel the use of .22's for self-defense, the more important question, which is seldom asked, is what did the individual do when hit?

Offline EagleSteel

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Re: .22lr for Harvesting Game Animals
« Reply #12 on: May 07, 2014, 12:02:29 PM »
.12 ga for me! I live in Ohio and we can't hunt deer with rifles.  >:(  I live in eastern Ohio south of Youngstown and it's very rural and extremely hilly. Zero reason to prevent rifle hunting. Oh how I would love to hunt Whitetail with at lever action 30-30.... :'(........ As for a your question, well I don't know if I would use a any of the .22 center fire rounds if the law permitted. Our deer run rather large and I would not risk wounding a deer to have it run off and become untrackable only for it to die and go to waste. I would want the confidence that my gun can take it down. That being said I would not use a .50 BMG.  ;D

Offline Rangeboss

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Re: .22lr for Harvesting Game Animals
« Reply #13 on: May 07, 2014, 01:18:07 PM »
In CA, you have to use a soft point lead, expanding round. .223 is acceptable, but in a lot of northern CA hunting grounds, there are a LOT of bears. I would not want be caught with a .223 in a situation with a bear coming at me. I would like to be able to back off, but if not, my .06 is my choice of "I want to live" gun.

Shot placement doesn't always mean they drop on the spot. They can run a long ways with a 40 grain .22 round in them.

Offline David in MN

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Re: .22lr for Harvesting Game Animals
« Reply #14 on: May 07, 2014, 04:40:49 PM »
There might be some variation in the animals hunted. The cold weather variants tend to be a bit larger. A certain caliber might be optimized in the south but underpowered in the north. A larger animal has less surface area to mass. (I listened to famed hunter Steve Rinella about this.)

Offline EagleSteel

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Re: .22lr for Harvesting Game Animals
« Reply #15 on: May 09, 2014, 09:41:00 AM »
There might be some variation in the animals hunted. The cold weather variants tend to be a bit larger. A certain caliber might be optimized in the south but underpowered in the north. A larger animal has less surface area to mass. (I listened to famed hunter Steve Rinella about this.)

That is very true. The Doe in my part of Ohio are at least as big as an average sized southern Buck.

nelson96

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Re: .22lr for Harvesting Game Animals
« Reply #16 on: May 09, 2014, 11:50:29 AM »
There might be some variation in the animals hunted. The cold weather variants tend to be a bit larger. A certain caliber might be optimized in the south but underpowered in the north. A larger animal has less surface area to mass. (I listened to famed hunter Steve Rinella about this.)

That is very true. The Doe in my part of Ohio are at least as big as an average sized southern Buck.

I don't want to read in to your posts, something you did not mean, but are you saying that it's okay to use a .22lr on a deer in the south?  From the little I know about Steve Rinella, I'd bet that he doesn't condone using a .22lr on any large game.

Offline EagleSteel

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Re: .22lr for Harvesting Game Animals
« Reply #17 on: May 09, 2014, 12:13:06 PM »
I don't want to read in to your posts, something you did not mean, but are you saying that it's okay to use a .22lr on a deer in the south?  From the little I know about Steve Rinella, I'd bet that he doesn't condone using a .22lr on any large game.

no no no.... I was just pointing out the difference in Whitetail size from North to South. In an earlier post you asked if anyone would use a .22 center fire round on Whitetail, example would be a 22-250. I said that I would not given the size of the deer in my area. That's where the size of deer from the north vs south came into play.
« Last Edit: May 09, 2014, 12:44:05 PM by EagleSteel »

Offline EagleSteel

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Re: .22lr for Harvesting Game Animals
« Reply #18 on: May 09, 2014, 12:15:14 PM »
.12 ga for me! I live in Ohio and we can't hunt deer with rifles.  >:(  I live in eastern Ohio south of Youngstown and it's very rural and extremely hilly. Zero reason to prevent rifle hunting. Oh how I would love to hunt Whitetail with at lever action 30-30.... :'(........ As for a your question, well I don't know if I would use a any of the .22 center fire rounds if the law permitted. Our deer run rather large and I would not risk wounding a deer to have it run off and become untrackable only for it to die and go to waste. I would want the confidence that my gun can take it down. That being said I would not use a .50 BMG.  ;D

Looks like Ohio is going to allow hunters to use rifles with straight walled cartriges for deer hunting this year. I may have to buy a lever action .44 mag.

Offline David in MN

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Re: .22lr for Harvesting Game Animals
« Reply #19 on: May 09, 2014, 12:37:54 PM »
I don't want to read in to your posts, something you did not mean, but are you saying that it's okay to use a .22lr on a deer in the south?  From the little I know about Steve Rinella, I'd bet that he doesn't condone using a .22lr on any large game.

No, not at all. My point is that similar animals might take a different caliber depending on location. It just needs to be a said that a deer in Texas isn't quite a deer in northern Wisconsin.

nelson96

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Re: .22lr for Harvesting Game Animals
« Reply #20 on: May 09, 2014, 12:51:32 PM »
No, not at all. My point is that similar animals might take a different caliber depending on location. It just needs to be a said that a deer in Texas isn't quite a deer in northern Wisconsin.

On that note I think you missed Steve Rinella's point (just guessing).  IMO the difference in size of deer in Texas vs. Wisconsin doesn't warrant a change in caliber as long as one doesn't start out with a caliber as small as some use, which I am against.

Offline David in MN

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Re: .22lr for Harvesting Game Animals
« Reply #21 on: May 09, 2014, 01:32:45 PM »
On that note I think you missed Steve Rinella's point (just guessing).  IMO the difference in size of deer in Texas vs. Wisconsin doesn't warrant a change in caliber as long as one doesn't start out with a caliber as small as some use, which I am against.

Fair enough... Rinella was focused on how northern animals tend to be larger. He didn't specify caliber. I think it's a cool topic but I'm not falling on my sword for it.

nelson96

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Re: .22lr for Harvesting Game Animals
« Reply #22 on: May 09, 2014, 01:56:39 PM »
Fair enough... Rinella was focused on how northern animals tend to be larger. He didn't specify caliber.

I would certainly agree with you and Steve on size difference.  Was the comment as simple as that, or was he referencing calber in the interview as well?. . . .  Using the quote; "a certain caliber might be optimized in the south but underpowered in the north" as the reason I ask.

We have four species of deer in Oregon alone and all four are considerably different in size; Blacktail Deer (smallest), Columbia Whitetail Deer (small), Whitetail Deer (larger), Mule Deer (largest).  The differences in size revel that of your north/south example, but even so, most hunters here use the same caliber on one or the other.  Many of us own a "deer" rifle and an "elk" rifle.

Offline Steve Cover

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Re: .22lr for Harvesting Game Animals
« Reply #23 on: May 12, 2014, 02:19:23 PM »
The "SURVIVAL" use of the 22LR for larger game.

While I fully concur that 22 LR can kill much larger animals than the normal small game, it depends on the "perfect" shot location.
See how often you can hit a dime, and at what range when you are cold and hungry in the bush.
Can you get that close to your game?

Hunting from an elevated blind can get you pretty close to big game. (Ask any bow hunter)
Are you in a secure enough situation to locate and construct a blind?
From such a shooting position, can you still hit my dime?
Exactly where do you aim? (Assuming different orientations of your animal)

So, what are we really looking at?
Considering pure ballistics, the little LR can indeed kill.
However, introducing the human factor, is it practical to try? (Other than in dire desperation...)
Outside of a desperate situation, using the LR on larger game, in my opinion, is not sporting nor necessary.

A 257 Roberts serves my wife well for deer sized game, and I use a 30-30 for brush & a 30-06 for open areas.

My survival kit includes a variety of snares... Much more reliable for harvesting game... And of course, are reusable.
This will be my first choice if I am ever forced into a survival situation.

Steve





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Re: .22lr for Harvesting Game Animals
« Reply #24 on: May 12, 2014, 05:00:46 PM »
Personally, I'd never consider the .22LR an all in one rifle for survival.  I'd much rather have a .22/20ga over/under than a .22 alone.  I just don't see .22 doing the job reliably in real world field conditions, especially if there's potentially game than can come after you (bear, mountain lion, wolf, goat...).  I have hunted with .243 and I have nothing against the round inside 100 yards, but outside that range I think there's too little energy and the influence of wind would appear to be too great to have reliable outcome, even on small deer (no less elk or moose).  Besides, our state prohibits large game hunting with anything smaller than .243 Win, so it wouldn't even be an option if I wanted to hunt with .223/5.56.

In the end, I think there's far more talk about the effectiveness of a .22LR than there is reality.  I don't see 5.56 as a very adequate combat round.  My understanding is that the original intention wasn't to replace the M14, but rather, to replace the M1 Carbine for officers and behind the lines personnel.  In any case, while I might feel comfortable with a 5.56 at 100 yards where I'll likely have time to take another shot before the person closes on me, at closer ranges I want a round that is more likely to cause greater damage to the skeletal and nervous system, thus preventing further risk to me.

Offline NWPilgrim

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Re: .22lr for Harvesting Game Animals
« Reply #25 on: May 13, 2014, 11:59:54 AM »
I think that adage of the .22LR being the ideal survival rifle is questionable, or at least needs context.


In a collapse survival situation less noise may out weight lethality. And there may be a presumption that large game will be less frequently encountered in a person's locale and that small game may be the more likely target (how true that is is up for debate).


It takes a LOT of squirrels to equal the meat on one deer, elk, moose or bear!  And a .22LR may be able to take down a large animal but not as reliably under field conditions.  How many opportunities will you get to shoot a large animal in a survival situation?  I would rather have a .30-06 or similar that would better ensure success on any opportunity that presents itself.


Hopefully few of us have to choose just one firearm for survival, and can have two or more available that are best suited to the game and conditions.  A .22LR gun is certainly useful for many situations such as training, small game, pests, and slaughtering. But to purposely pass up a centerfire rifle for large game and stubbornly rely on a .22LR would be unnecessarily foolish.

Offline Scottman

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Re: .22lr for Harvesting Game Animals
« Reply #26 on: May 13, 2014, 05:19:00 PM »
I like the rimfire small rifles in 22 s/l/lr, 22 magnum, and 17 hmr. I like them because they dont' take up a lot of room in my pack. Personally the weakest cartridge I have killed deer with so far is 7.62x39 and .243 inside 150 yards. Everytime I go deer hunting my little rimfire rifle is also along. I had the 223 along last year with the federal msr load but didn't get to test it. 

On a side note I always wonder why it seems nobody uses more powerful guns to slaughter. The local guy went through 1500 rounds of 22 magnum last year.


nelson96

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Re: .22lr for Harvesting Game Animals
« Reply #27 on: May 13, 2014, 06:38:35 PM »
On a side note I always wonder why it seems nobody uses more powerful guns to slaughter. The local guy went through 1500 rounds of 22 magnum last year.

The one's who have experienced a steer running off with a gate wrapped around its neck do. . . .  It's happened on my place and I won't allow him to use a .22 anymore (not that he wants to anymore).

Offline iccustoms

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Re: .22lr for Harvesting Game Animals
« Reply #28 on: May 19, 2014, 02:52:41 PM »
I just got into hunting the last 3 years and have in turn only taken 3 deer.  That said, they have all been with 5.56, through my AR.  Three deer, 3 rounds, each with 1 shot to the head.  Two were taken in California, 1 in Idaho.  All were within 100 yards and shot with Asym Precision 70 grain Barnes solid copper hollow points.

I've spent my entire adult life carrying a AR platform.  I shoot combat guns that happen to serve the role of hunting, in part because that is all I own.  For me personally it is all about shot placement, not because I am concerned about the round being underpowered, but because I feel it is ethical.  Honestly, I always feel a little sad when I kill a deer, they are awesome animals.  I would feel horrible if the thing ran off after being shot...

Keep in mind that I am not a ninja by any stretch.  Know your capabilities and work within them.  I shoot anywhere from 250 to 3000 rounds a month.  Conversely my father-in-law, an avid hunter, confirms his zero with maybe 10 rounds before deer season.  He has wounded deer he has been unable to locate.  I think a lot of hunters fall in line closer to him (with respect to their amount shooting, not wounding animals) than myself.  Not saying right or wrong, just a observation.

The rifle is just a tool in your hands.  Shoot with what you are comfortable and competent with.  If you feel you need a bigger round, go for it.  Shoot a deer in the ass with a 416 Rigby, the deer will die...  ...probably where it stands. 

On a side note * I also understand there are sportsmen out there that want to mount the rack.  I am just in it for the meat, and making buckskin.  So for some, head shots are out.

The argument of 22lr taking so many animals is often referenced, but the context is in years past, people hunting for sustenance, not with $150 out-of-state game tags on hunting trips.  Its large use was a product of availability and affordability.

Offline NWPilgrim

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Re: .22lr for Harvesting Game Animals
« Reply #29 on: May 19, 2014, 03:48:23 PM »
The argument of 22lr taking so many animals is often referenced, but the context is in years past, people hunting for sustenance, not with $150 out-of-state game tags on hunting trips.  Its large use was a product of availability and affordability.


Interesting observation, iccustoms.  My grandfather hunted deer during the Depression.  He could not afford much ammo and had six mouths to feed, mostly teenage boys. Although he owned a Remington Model 12 .22LR pump rifle, he chose to hunt the precious deer with a single .30-30 cartridge per trip in his Winchester 1894.