Author Topic: Your .22 Rifle of Choice  (Read 41389 times)

Offline Carl

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Re: Your .22 Rifle of Choice
« Reply #60 on: August 09, 2015, 08:27:56 AM »
Thanks Carl. The seller said nothing more about it, he mainly offers like wholesale deals and when selling single units of something, he often just writes brand and caliber. Not sure what's the model. Here's a picture:
What's the large screw on receiver for? Is that a takedown model?


The rifle takedown screw,loosen screw ,pull rifle into two parts. Full disassembly from there.

http://www.gun-tests.com/special_reports/long_guns/rossi-gallery-rifle-american-gunsmith-book-rifle-12508-1.html#.VcdjNHFVhHw

Offline iam4liberty

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Re: Your .22 Rifle of Choice
« Reply #61 on: August 09, 2015, 10:04:38 AM »
My favorite 22 is a  Polish wz-48 trainer.  Being in the form of a Mosin Nagant it screams "history":

http://candrsenal.com/rifle-polish-wz-48-training-rifle/



I use this as a rest gun for people who have never shot before.   Because of its mass it has zero recoil.  And since the action is so simple it isn't confusing to them.   I often couple it with Lapua SK 22 lr Z reduced charge rounds.  This makes it quieter than a suppressed 22.  Which means no hearing protection is needed and there is no developing of flinches or blinks.  With steel targets all the shooter hears is "pffft" followed by "ding".   This provides very gratifying feedback for new shooters. By the way,  if you have a 22 lever or bolt action with a 20 inch barrel, this ammo is an incredibly easy and cheap way to add a "silent" firearm to your repertoire.  I have found them much more accurate and reliable than the other 22 reduced charge options out there.

Now for a 22 go-to gun,  I have generally liked the ruger 10/22 and Marlin 795.  I have two of each for Appleseed loaner rifles.  Each has seen many thousands of rounds without issue.  As mentioned above the 10/22 are especially nice with bolt release and tech sights.   An extended mag release is also a nice option.  The Marlins sport 4X scopes for those who have trouble with iron sights.   Of course all have GI slings.

This said,  I recently acquired a ruger american rimfire with 20 inch barrel and am loving it.  It is an amazing value and a great complement to a 10/22 that gives you the option to use a wider array of ammo like the above mentioned Lapua SK Z.

Offline Knecht

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Re: Your .22 Rifle of Choice
« Reply #62 on: August 09, 2015, 02:07:45 PM »
Thanks.
The Polish trainer is a nice gun, but I've seen them very rarely here, despite being so close to Poland.
What I have is an old CZ ZKM-456 target model with heavy barrel, which the previous owner modified into sort of .22 sniper-style rifle and did pretty good job, however, despite being very accurate and reliable, it's very heavy and sort of clumsy to use for just cheap plinking.
I was thinking about a Ruger 10/22 a lot, I have several other Rugers and like them, I'm just afraid I'd spend too much money accessorizing it.

Offline Knecht

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Re: Your .22 Rifle of Choice
« Reply #63 on: August 09, 2015, 04:48:19 PM »
I've just sent my "I'll take it", will see if I was too late or not.

Offline David in MN

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Re: Your .22 Rifle of Choice
« Reply #64 on: August 09, 2015, 04:59:09 PM »
Thanks.
The Polish trainer is a nice gun, but I've seen them very rarely here, despite being so close to Poland.
What I have is an old CZ ZKM-456 target model with heavy barrel, which the previous owner modified into sort of .22 sniper-style rifle and did pretty good job, however, despite being very accurate and reliable, it's very heavy and sort of clumsy to use for just cheap plinking.
I was thinking about a Ruger 10/22 a lot, I have several other Rugers and like them, I'm just afraid I'd spend too much money accessorizing it.

There's a CZ 456 bull barrel in our family I routinely shoot. Big, clunky but it hits a dime at 100 yards. Only problem has been a gummed up bolt. It needs good cleaning.

Offline Mortblanc

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Re: Your .22 Rifle of Choice
« Reply #65 on: August 09, 2015, 10:02:17 PM »
The large screw is the take down screw.  The stock comes off and takes part of the internals with it.

That is an old design and has no disconnector.  If you hold the trigger back and slam the pump action forward it will fire as fast as you can pump.

Offline Knecht

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Re: Your .22 Rifle of Choice
« Reply #66 on: August 10, 2015, 04:52:49 AM »
Just got a call from the shop, it's mine!
Never had a gun capable of slamfire, but sounds like fun! Also like something to be aware of.

Offline armymars

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Re: Your .22 Rifle of Choice
« Reply #67 on: August 11, 2015, 06:04:23 PM »
My 22 is a Savage MII with laminated stock. Pre Acutriger. I shot my best groups ever at 100 yrds with it using Federal gold match. The three shot group was .473 " c to c. Even with 22 Mini Mags It holds 2" at 100 Yrds.

Offline Knecht

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Re: Your .22 Rifle of Choice
« Reply #68 on: August 19, 2015, 04:08:54 PM »
Went to get my Rossi .22 pump today. Wasn't as great condition as described, but the bore is fine and everything works well. Wood is pretty much perfect, but I bet the gun spent a while leaned to a wall on wet floor, as the buttplate screws are very rusty and areas on receiver that got touched by shooter's hands have some pitting, too. Not sure if I'll let that pitting alone, or try to fix that. The polish on the stock is sort of flaky, close to the buttplate. Guess the wood got damp the same time the metal did. However, no dents and scratches in the wood. One day I may refinish the stock with just linseed oil.
I'm not a collector, so I don't mind if the gun loses some of the original finish. I don't even mind having some guns with worn finish and dented stock, I just don't like rust marks, even if not caused by me.

But anyway, I took it and I hope to find no more bad surprises when I take it out to the range. The disassembly screw works fine and the rifle is capable of slamfire.
One more little thing that really annoys me is the screw on the receiver that you need to get away if you want full disassembly of the bolt. Mine seems to be rather uniquely cracked. There seems to be a deep crack going in the slot, but both sides of the screw head are holding. Anyone experienced this? And even more important, yet silly question: anyone has a spare? Or, can anyone tell me if that screw's threading is metric or weird? Not sure if I can get this one out and if I break it inside, I may have to drill it out...while at it, I can just as easily cut new threading, that should be no problem, but I'd rather kept the original hole and just got an appropriate new screw for it.
Advice would be welcome as usual, thanks

Offline trekker111

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Re: Your .22 Rifle of Choice
« Reply #69 on: August 20, 2015, 06:20:46 AM »
Not sure about in Europe, but in the US, if you need a part for an older gun and numrich or Brownell's doesn't have it, you likely won't find it.

https://www.gunpartscorp.com

Offline Mortblanc

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Re: Your .22 Rifle of Choice
« Reply #70 on: August 20, 2015, 10:18:58 AM »
Knecht, I checked all the normal parts sources and all are sold out of the assembly screw and bushing.  almost every other part is available so that must be a faulty point of the design. 

I would begin a search for a suitable screw that could be modified to meet that need while the old one is still holding together.  I believe the Rossi is made in metric units so you should have less problem with this than we do over here.

You might check directly with the Rossi firm in Brazil and see if parts are still available.

Other than that there is only one recourse, use it until it snaps and tig weld a new head on there!

Offline Knecht

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Re: Your .22 Rifle of Choice
« Reply #71 on: August 20, 2015, 01:52:53 PM »
Thanks for the suggestions.

Offline Chris Gilliam

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Re: Your .22 Rifle of Choice
« Reply #72 on: August 20, 2015, 04:29:59 PM »
10/22.  But the 77/22 is nice too.

Offline Carl

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Re: Your .22 Rifle of Choice
« Reply #73 on: August 20, 2015, 04:38:34 PM »
I am partial to my Anschutz Olympic 1903 Target...

Offline hackmeister

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Re: Your .22 Rifle of Choice
« Reply #74 on: August 21, 2015, 08:06:06 AM »
For varmint hunting:
My old Marlin 25 that I learned to shoot when I was 7 years old. I just upgraded the scope and can't wait till small game season starts.

For plinking and cheap AR training:
S&W M&P 15-22


Offline WhiteBear620

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Re: Your .22 Rifle of Choice
« Reply #75 on: August 29, 2015, 01:15:22 PM »

My pick. 15-22. Because they are many like it, but this one is mine  :egyptian:
It's worked great for teaching a few family members how to shoot, start them on the red dot to get comfortable and confident, and then teach them irons after a few shots. Paint job and camo form wrap on the handguards are new though. Tip for anyone who gets their 15-22 down in the dirt, you can wrap your mags with the camo form to keep dirt out, unwrap it too load, rewrap it once loaded; obviously not a very good fix if you're not shooting a full mag though.