Survivalism & Self Sufficiency Topics > Homesteading and Self Reliant Living

yurt platform/land pics

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spud:
There are a  couple of thought processes with how your deck is supported.  The two are, first is the supports close enough together to keep your joist from sagging and second, are your post stationary enough and how are they handling frost heave. 

You should be able to find some tables from deck building that states the proper floor joist for the spans that you have. Another way would be pull a string along side of the bottom of  your furthest span without touching it and putting weight on it and measuring the deflection of it.  You would need to determine what a reasonable maximum weight it would likely encounter and put that on there.  With your bad knee(bummer), this doesn't sound like a great option for ya. 

Second, your post where just set on the ground, bummer, kind of a poor practice and it is pretty easy to make holes for your posts when you're building the darn thing. Just setting them on the ground might be OK if ya really level ground that drains nicely. It's best to have post below frost line to stop any heaving.  Having a yurt like yours is pretty cool cause a little frost heave here and there won't likely hurt a darn thing except make the door stick if it's heaving in that area.  There are many opinions on how to back fill posts, from using concrete, gravel, sand, gravel and concrete, you name it, it's out there. If it were me, I would have put post pretty deep in ground and back filled with gravel and maybe brace some posts with some posts angled at a 45, if ya know what I mean.  Every site is different, drainage, soil type, etc. 

More supports might not be needed, just remove some that ya have and place posts deeper. Fun with that is getting your post in there and tipping them in place without them being too short. I would have to scratch my head little and find a creative way to make that work, like maybe jacking it up a smidge higher than needed so when you come down it won't be too low.

When you shim it, give yourself the option of boards of many different thickness.  If you have a bud with a table saw or planer, you could make 5/8th, 3/8th's, etc.  I guess my anal tendencies are coming out of me doing too much finish carpentry in the past.  Not sure how much compression you will get, make sure your shims are good and dry and you could choose a denser wood and that wouldn't compress as much.

Don't know what type of soil ya got to dig but I use a twist type post digger here in my nice soil and I ya wanted, you could put different length (shorter) handle on it.  Also, I've used a bottle jack for that in the past and it worked nicely, don't know what kind of jack that you have available.

Good luck, I think you'll get it figured out. 

Jeff

ponycity:
I don't own a yurt, but I've stayed in a WeatherPort yurt once when I went camping (even though I would LOVE to live in one). I don't know a ton about them, but looking over this thread has been nice and informative.

Where I stayed, there was a concrete base with radiant heat. There were tubes with solar banks and it was nice and cozy inside. Without it on, it did drop significantly in a few hours.

It was really cool and I would love to see more pics if anyone has more to share. Thanks!

Black November:
I recently made a yurt like structure.

http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=57817.0

Cronezilla:
the Yurt looks super cool! but it also seems a little pricey. I guess I have more questions. Is it semi-permanent structure? how portable would you say for like a refugee scenario? Is there advantages to a wall tent?

a more permanent alternative that has more thermal mass for heating and cooling would be earthbag house. you could make it round if you don't like angles.  8)

surfivor:

--- Quote from: Cronezilla on January 19, 2017, 12:16:21 AM ---the Yurt looks super cool! but it also seems a little pricey. I guess I have more questions. Is it semi-permanent structure? how portable would you say for like a refugee scenario? Is there advantages to a wall tent?

a more permanent alternative that has more thermal mass for heating and cooling would be earthbag house. you could make it round if you don't like angles.  8)

--- End quote ---

 The yurt technically is semi-permanent .. It is a 20 foot yurt, obviously smaller ones are more movable. The platform itself is made of wood and a few feet off of the ground. It would be a little harder to move the platform than the yurt itself, but certainly could be done if it was disassembled. The yurt arrived as canvas and rafters on a small utility trailer pulled by a small truck and went up in a day. The platform was built a month or so before the yurt arrived.

 Building a yurt is not that difficult as I had studied it, although it would be time consuming. I believe the trickiest part is the center hole at the top as well as fitting the canvas exactly, though you can buy the canvas part from yurt companies. The frame itself consists mainly of a few simple boards, rafters, and lattice wall which can be taken apart. If portability was the main thing and living in the winter was not important, I think a smaller yurt between 11 and 15 feet or so would be a possibility ..

 I think the yurt is pretty sturdy and can withstand strong winds and heavy snow loads. It has rafters that are 2x6 and other points to hold a snow load and I installed a deadman as well even though I was told it was not necessary

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