Author Topic: Garbage Disposal  (Read 5188 times)

Offline ColdHaven

  • Coldylocks
  • Moderator On Leave
  • Survival Demonstrator
  • *
  • Posts: 3449
  • Karma: 175
  • How about a scary crow little fire?
Garbage Disposal
« on: December 23, 2008, 10:07:27 AM »
I know this sounds kind of silly, but in a survival situation where you are homesteading to provide your family and self with food and the like how do you deal with a garbage disposal problem?

Of course anything organic could be placed in a compost bin, but that about other things? In such a situation would garbage disposal sites still be operational? I somehow doubt that even in a tough situation that you would not be able to buy non-organic items and equipment. Would there be a way to recycle such things on your own such as melting them down? If so, would anyone know a way to do that? What would be some of the methods you would use in a SHTF situation?

Offline Gas-Mask

  • Survivalist Mentor
  • *****
  • Posts: 363
  • Karma: 12
  • Will work for food and fight for freedom!
Re: Garbage Disposal
« Reply #1 on: December 24, 2008, 02:19:00 AM »
Hate to say it but about 20 years back... some friend of my dads used to burn their trash... and this was up near Fresno....

Also, 3rd world countries do this alot!!!!! an I mean alot!

Not something I would do but... then again...  if push comes to shove....

Lucretius

  • Guest
Re: Garbage Disposal
« Reply #2 on: December 24, 2008, 03:13:04 AM »
Hm, I can't come up with anything I'd throw away.

The compost bin swallows a lot.

Plastic and glass containers are useful, and I only throw those away now because new ones keeps coming in everytime we buy stuff. If living completely indepedendently on a homestead, I'd have to use and reuse the same ones basically forever.

Same goes for metal cans, plastic bags, etc.

Paper and such are good for starting fires.

The only useless thing IMO is light bulbs (which could make a descent burglar alarm FTW!)

Offline Gas-Mask

  • Survivalist Mentor
  • *****
  • Posts: 363
  • Karma: 12
  • Will work for food and fight for freedom!
Re: Garbage Disposal
« Reply #3 on: December 24, 2008, 04:24:04 PM »
oh yeah... that too.... :P ;D

Joel

  • Guest
Re: Garbage Disposal
« Reply #4 on: December 24, 2008, 05:15:48 PM »
Quote
I know this sounds kind of silly, but in a survival situation where you are homesteading to provide your family and self with food and the like how do you deal with a garbage disposal problem?

T'aint silly at all.  I live in the boonies, and it's an issue.

Organics get composted, like a few people already said.  Burnables, we burn.  That probably sounds like heresy if you live in a city, and I confess I had to get used to it myself.  Hadn't seen a burning barrel in years.  But yeah, burn'em.  Glass jars get re-used; they're valuable. 

That leaves tin cans, beer bottles (ahem) and non-flammable construction/demolition trash.  Haven't found a self-sufficient answer for that one, so I haul it to the landfill.  If ever the day came when that was no longer practical, and I was generating that much trash, I'd contract with a neighbor who has a backhoe and make my own landfill.  I'd really hate to do that, though.

One problem I've got with my compost heap is that it attracts animals that I otherwise try to persuade to stay away from the ridge.  Open garbage attracts prey animals, which attract predators, which are dangerous to pets and livestock.  I've often wondered if the compost heap is a good thing.

Offline Shadowrider

  • Survivor
  • ***
  • Posts: 152
  • Karma: 25
Re: Garbage Disposal
« Reply #5 on: December 24, 2008, 09:22:45 PM »
One problem I've got with my compost heap is that it attracts animals that I otherwise try to persuade to stay away from the ridge.  Open garbage attracts prey animals, which attract predators, which are dangerous to pets and livestock.  I've often wondered if the compost heap is a good thing.

Joel, we bury our compost and sprinkle our used coffee grounds over the top soil. I can't say it keeps animals out 100% of the time, but we rarely see signs of animals digging. No smell at all. Very happy worms. ;D I hope that helps.
« Last Edit: December 31, 2008, 05:12:01 PM by DeltaEchoVictor »

Offline T Kehl

  • Survivalist Mentor
  • *****
  • Posts: 378
  • Karma: 19
Re: Garbage Disposal
« Reply #6 on: December 31, 2008, 09:25:31 AM »
In a SHTF scenario, trash will be reduced as food will have to be grown rather than bought resulting in greatly reduced amounts of "trash".  What is left would be valuable due to the reduction in raw material available.

As for a homestead situation without SHTF, my parents separate trash into compost, recyclable, burnable, and straight trash.  The compost pile is on sight as is a barrel for burning.  Recylables are kept in the garage to reduce trips to the center and trash is taken to town when the bag is full.

Doing this reduces actual trash to about a kitchen trash bag every month or two!

Some people may think of this a crude, but it is a significant reduction in landfill material and is much better than the past methods used by some neighbors of digging a hole in the pasture or tossing it in a sinkhole.

Kara

  • Guest
Re: Garbage Disposal
« Reply #7 on: January 01, 2009, 12:51:04 PM »
Joel, we bury our compost and sprinkle our used coffee grounds over the top soil. I can't say it keeps animals out 100% of the time, but we rarely see signs of animals digging. No smell at all. Very happy worms. ;D I hope that helps.

Shadowrider, this is something I haven't heard of before, and sounds like it would be worth it's own discussion thread. Can you post more about this?

Offline Shadowrider

  • Survivor
  • ***
  • Posts: 152
  • Karma: 25
Re: Garbage Disposal
« Reply #8 on: January 01, 2009, 01:22:22 PM »
Hi Wintersparrow.

I'm glad to offer more info. We have used coffee grounds for years to keep animals out of the compost.

When we bury our kitchen scraps, we dig a good hole, then carefully drop the contents of the compost bucket down in the hole, without touching the sides of the hole. Then we knock down the dirt from the sides into the hole just in case anything drippy ends up on it, add coffee grounds, cover with dirt, then sprinkle more coffee grounds on top. (It's very important to not touch the sides of the hole and then knock that dirt down to prevent any odors a critter might think interesting). I know that most sources say to never bury bones, but we do so with no problems. I will say that my DH is better at getting the smells completely hidden in the hole, because his never get dug up. Occasionally one of mine will.  :o

We have a ceramic compost bucket on our kitchen sink. http://www.gardeners.com/Kitchen-Compost-Crock/20707,13006,default,cp.html When it is full or stinky a hole gets dug somewhere in the yard. The worms love it. We only bury what will enrich our soil (no bottles, cans, etc.)

Like twk188s' parents, we also separate all our garbage. We have one small kitchen garbage bag partially filled every week. That's it. All paper goes in a bag, all cans, bottles, & plastic in another and those go out with the garbage for pick up in a separate bag provided by the county. Any bottles that were taxed extra (I know, it's called CRV and a fee, but it's a tax and thus a rip off when all I get a teensy portion of it back after messing with returning the stupid bottles) are stored until we have a few bags to drop off at the recycling center. We're not "green" or into global warming, just being good stewards of our property.

My husband also sprinkles coffee grounds in our garbage bag on trash day to keep animals from digging in it. I can say that most all of our neighbors have had their trash cans dug through and strewn all over the street. Ours has never been bothered. Of course, there isn't anything in our can to eat either. Any smells come from plastic wrappings around meat and such. And those are rinsed before they go in the trash bag, sprinkled with coffee grounds, then tied shut.

I mentioned the coffee grounds idea to my brother and he added that he saw a show on TV about drug smugglers using coffee grounds to confuse the drug sniffing dogs. I haven't verified that, but my Bro is a good source of all kinds of information.

I hope that's helpful, Wintersparrow! Thanks for asking.
« Last Edit: May 12, 2009, 06:47:42 PM by Sister Wolf »

Kara

  • Guest
Re: Garbage Disposal
« Reply #9 on: January 01, 2009, 01:49:29 PM »
The soil on my property is awful, and this idea will help to fix it. I also have a lot of trouble with the neighborhood animals getting into my garbage. Fabulous info...thanks and +1!