Survivalism & Self Sufficiency Topics > Outdoors Activities

winter backpacking

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surfivor:
 Andy,

 I wonder how hard it would be to build your own stove pipe similar to what kifaru makes ?

 I've found some web sites that describe making stoves, even small ones. Making your own portable stove pipe I'm less clear on.

 Since the kifaru stuff is expensive, it seems like a valuable exercise to consider how you could make your own equipment if that is feasible. In a societal melt down, it occurs to me that someone might try to steal my equipment. If that happened, I could be out of alot of valuable stuff I couldn't replace. I'm sure I could not make something quite as compact and portable as they do, but I do wonder what might be possible.

 Some of these little stoves seem like they could make overnight canoe trips in the spring more feasible as the nights may be cold ..

Here is something that seems similar to kifaru stoves:
http://www.titaniumgoat.com/stoves.html

This company also sells pipes separately, maybe that would be an option. I guess they are stainless steel or titanium. That being the case, I am not sure how the heat would not effect the tent fabric or if I am not getting the whole picture. I didn't see where kifaru might sell stove pipes separately.

http://www.titaniumgoat.com/pipe-parts.html

I guess what they have is something called a stove boot that you sew into your tent wall:


This is a home made stove:


Andy in NH:

--- Quote from: surfivor on December 25, 2010, 06:45:48 AM --- I wonder how hard it would be to build your own stove pipe similar to what kifaru makes ?
--- End quote ---
Not hard, you just have to find the stainless steel foil they use and cut it to size.  You would have to fabricate the stovepipe rings also.


--- Quote ---I've found some web sites that describe making stoves, even small ones. Making your own portable stove pipe I'm less clear on.
--- End quote ---
There is a lot of info here on building small wood stoves.  They all seem to use the same stovepipe design: http://www.zombiehunters.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=26369


--- Quote --- In a societal melt down, it occurs to me that someone might try to steal my equipment.
--- End quote ---
In that case I'd suggest using a different option entirely.


--- Quote ---I didn't see where kifaru might sell stove pipes separately.
--- End quote ---
They do - just call them and order one.


--- Quote ---I guess what they have is something called a stove boot that you sew into your tent wall:
--- End quote ---
Kifaru's is very similar.

joeinwv:
There are a lot of DIY stoves for camping out there - I have seen them made from empty Coleman fuel cans, 50 cal ammo can, propane / freon tanks, etc.

The downside of most of these are they are not foldable and make some compromise with attaching the stove pipe.

Mr. Red Beard (UKtheBUNNY):
Tent vs Tarp??? Hammocks all the way. You loose more body heat from the ground and my setup is only about 3Lbs. Thanks for the info on DIY'ing the collapsible stove Andy.

Andy in NH:

--- Quote from: UKtheBUNNY on December 20, 2011, 10:47:27 AM ---Tent vs Tarp??? Hammocks all the way. You loose more body heat from the ground and my setup is only about 3Lbs.
--- End quote ---

I'm not sure how cold your winters get, but around here they are cold enough to really challenge a hammock sleeper.

I slept in my Hennessey Hammock during the early fall (and not this weird warm one) and needed extra insulation under me to keep warm. The open space under the hammock really contributes to convection heat loss.

Hammocks are really comfortable to sleep in if you are a back or side sleeper.

The drawback is when you are in a hammock you can't do much in there; cooking, drying gear, and prepping for the next day all become really problematic.

Shamelessly paraphrased from reply #27:

--- Quote ---To defeat conductive heat loss while sleeping during the winter, I put a USGI casualty blanket down on the snow to keep the moisture away.  Then I place a USGI closed cell foam mat on top of if.  On top of that I place a DownMat 7 DLX inflatable air mattress.  (I still use the foam pad just in case the inflatable leaks)  I wrap myself in a USGI MSS (the three-bag system) for a bag.  I also keep a USGI poncho-liner inside the bag to protect it from dirt and grime.
--- End quote ---

For fall / winter, I prefer a Super-Tarp or a Tipi.

I'm glad you enjoyed the stove info.

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