Survivalism & Self Sufficiency Topics > Food Storage

Maybe I am doing it wrong? Emergency food storage

(1/4) > >>

Carl:
  I store some food for emergency use and get thoughts of inadequacy from time to time....I don't store low calorie or 'balanced' meals as I have high carb basics and high calorie ,easy to store foods. While I have a couple of years worth of the high calorie basics and do eat from this stock from time to time,I rarely eat 'correctly' from my storage....is it wrong to store high carb,high calorie foods in such an imbalance?  I have long and medium storage foods,canned,freeze dried,and even dry goods like pastas,rice,potatoes....just my storage has little of the low calorie stuff to complete  the food pyramid,little balance...though I do eat vegetables,I grow or purchase the stuff as needed....not a part of my storage though...I have thoughts that I might actually need some low calorie stuff for balance ...looking for opinions and asking if any others by-pass low calorie storage...

Redman:
Carl you've mentioned in the past that chemo takes a pretty good toll on the body. I'm not a dietician but I'd say you probably need some balance but also the high carb/high calorie stuff in view of the chemo. I'd suggest talking with your doctor or dietician.

mountainmoma:
You should add a few things, most likely.

Dehydrated carrots and onions in #10 cans are fantastic.  I cooked one winter at home using an open can of each to try it out.  Soak in water and they rehydrate like fresh, onion smell, carrots are still crisp.  I do not like canned carrots, but I like rehydrated dried carrots.  A very small amount of carrots will get your daily requirement of vitamin A.  I have also tried out and worked with dried tomato powder, which is also great, although if you have enough canned to tomato products you rotate you do not have to have this. 

UC davis just released a study where they found that canned fruits and vegetables were usually just as nutritious and fresh ( as our fresh is often not picked that minute) and frozen.  so if you are rotating thru a years supply of canned tomatoes, peaches and apricots you would be getting some vit C foods, and it would make meals more interesting.

But, since I dont normally go thru that much canned fruits and vegtables in a regular year, I do have some LTS fruits and veg, for variety.  I added a few later, not in initial storage.  My initial LTS has dehydrated onions, carrots and tomato powder and dehydrated apple slices, and potato flakes.  I calculated  how much of these were needed to makes meal.  Only the carrots and tomato powder have real vitamin content, but the others make it so the food is good.  Later, now and then when there was a sale, I have added a few other things.  6 freeze dried cans of other fruits ( blackberry and something else), dehydrated bell pepper, which adds alot of flavor and has vit C, a few cans of misc vegetables, not very much realy as freeze dried vegtables are expensive, but a few cans ( one brocolli, one green bean, one corn...) means now and then if living off of storage some variety can happen.  Eventually I added a bucket of soup mix vegetables, which is dehydrated cabbage, onion, potato, maybe something else. 

I also store red feather canned butter, quite a bit, as butter is good and makes everything better

Carl:
  I do ,in normal times,have a varied diet....it is my long term storage that is more calorie dense and lacks the vegetables....though this is not hard to fix with a few number 10 cans. I also read where others are looking into MEAL in a JAR,where they pre-make meals and this concept is also interesting to me though the labor of preparation is likely beyond me.

Peppers,carrots,onions,berries,and bananas are on my sale watch list ....

mountainmoma:
The blackberries I have are freeze dried, and while I have never tried them, to get the case sale price, I split the case with a friend, and she is not a food storage person, she used them for snacks for the kids and said they were very good.

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

Go to full version