Armory, Self Defense, And EDC > The .22 Caliber Rifle: An Essential Homestead Firearm

"Savage Model 187 Series A" .22LR

(1/5) > >>

d3nni5:
All,

Anyone have any experience with this rifle?   It is my "childhood" 22, the one I learned to shoot with.  My brother gave it to me over Thanksgiving and it is need of some TLC

I have a couple of questions..

1.)   First it says "Springfield Model 187"  "Savage Arms" "Series A".   So I'm going with that it is a Savage, some quick Google searches also mention a Stevens model as well.   I'm assuming that this was made for a variety of retailers?

2.)   It is tube fed, similar to the Marlin 60's but I'm going to guess that the "guts" of it are totally different.

3.)   It did shoot!   I took it to the range two days ago, put 15 rounds through it just to make sure it functioned.   One thing I noticed is that the bolt holds open after you fire, so long as you keep the trigger back.  Let the trigger forward, the bolt returns and chambers the next round.   Not sure if this is by design?  It could that it is cruddy and not cleaned (just a guess) in 20 years.

If anyone has any pointers or manuals you can share that would be great.   I'm going to try to contact Savage this week and see if they have any manuals I can use.

As a side note, I couldn't bee happier.   This is not a treasure from a monetary point.   It was however my fathers ONLY gun.  My brother has trusted me with its care and I'm going to do my best to give it the attention it needs and return it to a safe and reliable operating condition.  It brings back memories man.   Since dad's passing this past April, I have thought about that old gun and mentioned it to my family.  It was a nice surprise.


Cedar:
I have to go pull mine out and see what model it is.

Cedar

flippydidit:
I would definitely start with getting a manual and cleaning it.  Pay special attention to how it was taken apart, and how you are putting it back together.  It likely won't need new parts (just a good cleaning), but parts can get broken easily if it isn't put back together correctly.  You can very quickly spend more in parts on an old .22 rifle than it is worth.  That probably wouldn't keep you from buying them; as it was your father's.  It's just nice to not need to buy parts if you don't have to.  Here are some tips to help you out:

1)  Use a digital camera to take pictures of each step during disassembly.  You can then go back and check "which way that flat spring was facing" or any number of things you may not have noticed in your rush to take the gun down for cleaning.

2)  Here's a parts diagram to help:  http://stevespages.com/ipb-springfield-187.html

3)  If you need parts that are very difficult to find (meaning you've checked everywhere else), there is a company that specializes in them.  It requires buying their catalog before you can order the parts.  Which is why I recommend trying to find your parts somewhere else before you try them.  Here is their link:  http://www.jackfirstgun.com/

Hope this helps!

d3nni5:
Thanks Flippy,

I also found that schematic here...

http://www.gunpartscorp.com/Manufacturers/SavageStevensSpringfieldFox-33479/Rifles-40502/187Series-39701/187SeriesA-33833.htm?results=30&page=3

It looks like they have several parts for purchase too if needed.

The digital camera photo of every part as I break it down is a good idea, I definitely will do that for sure.  Aren't you a gunsmith?   Any idea about the bolt staying open when the trigger is held back?   Is this a "feature" or a "problem"   :).

Thanks a million man!

flippydidit:

--- Quote from: Mountain State Prepper on December 01, 2013, 11:03:08 AM ---Thanks Flippy,

I also found that schematic here...

http://www.gunpartscorp.com/Manufacturers/SavageStevensSpringfieldFox-33479/Rifles-40502/187Series-39701/187SeriesA-33833.htm?results=30&page=3

It looks like they have several parts for purchase too if needed.

The digital camera photo of every part as I break it down is a good idea, I definitely will do that for sure.  Aren't you a gunsmith?   Any idea about the bolt staying open when the trigger is held back?   Is this a "feature" or a "problem"   :).

Thanks a million man!

--- End quote ---

I am a gunsmith, though I don't like to give advice on open forums (it's a liability thing).  Some things about your rifle.  It does have the locking bolt, which is a hold-open.  Pull the bolt ALL the way back, and push the knob in until it locks.  That should hold the bolt open.  You may have to play with it a little if it is rusty/dirty.  If you want it to function in semi-automatic mode, the bolt needs to be out (away from the receiver).  If the bolt just flops in and out, you may need to clean it better or replace some parts.

Definitely do a complete cleaning job on it before you decide that you need to buy parts for it.  Use a ridiculous amount of solvent and a wire brush (except on wood, plastic/nylon or rubber).  Once it's good and cleaned, take a look at how it operates.  Pay special attention to parts that have been worn (shiny).  Look at the tip of the firing pin and the face of the chamber (where the firing pin matches up).  If the firing pin is chipped, or the chamber is chewed up, that can indicate whether the rifle was dry fired.

On this specific rifle, I'd take a look at the spring and detent that is used to retain the locking bolt (bolt handle).  Those two may need replaced.  Also look at the lifter assembly (part numbers 43-46).  The spring is notorious for needing replacement.

Let me know if you have any other questions.

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

Go to full version