Survivalism & Self Sufficiency Topics > Fishing

Canoe Fishing

(1/2) > >>

farmerjonboy:
I've always wanted to canoe fish and I am not sure where or if there is a topic on canoe fishing, know there is one for kyaks but thought a canoe one would be nice.

Ok, first is size, from my point of view, size is huge, because you got to fit a couple rods, then a second one for backup. The size though is a big part of it if for any other reason other than where you are planning on fishing. If you do not know how deep it is where you will be fishing, best thing is gps programs and maybe even programs like google earth or microsoft virtual earth to gauge the depth.
 
You also got to fit a cooler in there, being a person who works at Walmart (garden center specifically, but I pass by sporting goods a lot between recieving / break room / time clock and garden) and think anything under 40 quarts would be nice, unless you get a big fish then you got to be pretty creative, or if you have a big enough canoe, a + 40 quarts cooler is nice. I was also looking at the possibility of building ones own cooler to custom fit the cooler into the canoe.

These are probably the 2 big things I look at when canoe fishing, does anyone have anything on this?

Optix:
I had the same fiberglass canoe for 25 years. I had a Minn Kota 35 electric trolling motor on it and that thing was great, especially for river fishing. Easy to manouver for casting, holding against the wind. Mine was a 16 foot and alright for two ppl.

Canoes IMO are not for big deep waters though, unless it is a sheltered mountain lake. Not stable enough or enough freeboard. Probably forget anything electronic, cept maybe your phone in a zip bag, in case you tip. Use a map.

Apart from my motor, a fishing rod, map, life jacket, paddles, water and food; that's all I carried with me. Good idea to tie your paddle and maybe your tackle box to your canoe on a short length of rope. Tipping sucks.



Noah:
You can get portable fish finders for canoes that give you depth and show you what the bottom looks like.  A waterproof GPS (all of them are) is great also for marking productive spots.  I always secure all my valuables in a floating plastic box that is not tied to the boat.  At a very minimum my wallet, phone, and car keys so that is the canoe tips or sinks I can grab the box and a life vest and make my way back to shore. 

Really though, the only way I would recommend a canoe over a kayak is if you are bringing a second person. Otherwise, a kayak is so much more stable in my humble opinion.

tstensberg:
I don't have any experience with a kayak, so I can't exactly comment on that, but I have done a lot of duck hunting and fishing out of my canoe.  If stability is an issue,  buy or make some outriggers for it and your problem is solved.  I typically won't bring a cooler with me for fish storage, I find it much easier to use a stringer and let whatever you catch drag behind the canoe, it really saves a lot of space.

I absolutely love fishing and hunting out of my canoe.  You're limited to smaller bodies of waters and rivers... but at the same token, it can go many places that a larger boat can't.

joeinwv:
I have a 14'6" canoe. I use a 35# trolling motor. I carry a small cooler (9 can size) and I have a milk crate to hold all my fishing gear. I zip tied some 2" pvc to the crate to use as rod holders.

I can troll with this setup. Works well for smaller lakes. The disadvantages are obvious - it's a canoe. You can't mount a 50hp motor, it's top speed is about 6mph, only holds 2-3 people, etc.

The positives - it's a canoe. Easy to paddle, draws about 6" of water, can get into inlets and backwaters other boats cannot. No trailer, throw it on roof and go. You can take your wife and a dog with you.

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

Go to full version