Author Topic: New Baby Preps  (Read 3079 times)

Offline PrepperJim

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New Baby Preps
« on: July 31, 2013, 01:57:58 PM »
All -

My wife and I are about 3 weeks away from having a new baby boy. I feel like I should be building specific preps for a new baby, just like I have some for the dog and cats, in addition to the standard stuff that we already have (diapers, clothes, wipes, etc, etc). That is, the baby has specific needs that are not covered by my basic stash. For a kit, I am thinking:

1) Water - increase storage for both baby and breastfeeding mother.
2) Food - store formula just in case mom is not available or cannot breast feed.
3) Bottles and nipples
4) Way to clean bottles
5) Diapers, changing cloths, wipes, wash cloths
6) Several changes of clothing, hat, gloves
7) Blankets and swaddling cloths
8) Trash bags for dirty diapers
9) Baby shampoo and/or soap
10) Copy of birth certificate, medical documents, etc
11) Phone numbers for doctors, location of nearest emergency rooms, emergency procedures
12) Baby rectal thermometer
13) His first tactical light. ;-)

Am I forgetting anything?

Any recommendation for a good formula?

Medicine for a newborn/infant?

Offline Cedar

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Re: New Baby Preps
« Reply #1 on: July 31, 2013, 02:08:06 PM »
Socks.. socks, socks.
Pedialyte
Babywipes, even if they are homemade ones in a coffee can
Lavender EO, to mix in with baby lotion for massages.

Cedar

Offline PrepperJim

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Re: New Baby Preps
« Reply #2 on: July 31, 2013, 06:42:45 PM »
Socks.. socks, socks.
Pedialyte
Babywipes, even if they are homemade ones in a coffee can
Lavender EO, to mix in with baby lotion for massages.

Cedar

Yeah, socks. I live in Houston and it is hot as hell this time of year. With an ETA the end of August, it will be six weeks before we see relief. But, my wife is all over the socks and hats. My trick now will be to abscond with three sets of cloths without her noticing. Or, I can just go buy my own. Camo onesies? Hunter orange hats? I am on top of it!!  ;-)

Awesome tip on the Pedialyte. If the power goes out for an extended period of time and I don't have enough gas to continually run the generator and one-room A/C, dehydration could become an issue. Then again, my plan is to get off X is that is an issue. Then again, what if I cannot get off X?


Offline Cordovil

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Re: New Baby Preps
« Reply #3 on: August 01, 2013, 10:20:25 AM »
First of all -- congratulations!  I have 3 little ones, and experienced a two-week power/heat/hot water outage during Sandy, when the youngest was 4 months, so I have some experience with baby prepping needs.

Your list is a good one -- you've done your research.

+1 on the Pedialyte; a little known fact is that it also comes in powder-mix, so I'd get some both in liquid form and in powder mix (for longer-term storage) -- it's also lighter to travel with that way.

Re baby formula, my wife nursed, but when we ultimately had to, we used Similac, the blue-container version.  Comes in powder or liquid ready-to-drink versions; whatever brand you go with, get both powder and a few ready-to-drink ones.

I'd add a diaper changing pad -- you'll probably already have one, but if you have to bug out and are on the road, and you need to change the baby's diaper somewhere, it's always good to have a clean pad to put down.  They fold up pretty small too.

You might also have included this already in among the clothes/blankets, but for small babies they make these sleep-sack things, sort of like wearable sleeping bags for the kids (it's a SIDS safety thing, keeps the baby warm but safer than a blanket because it's less likely to move up to cover his face while he's sleeping).  In the event you are bugging out, it might make sense to have 1 cold weather version (e.g. fleece) and one warm-weather version (e.g. cotton).

It seems that infant Tylenol (or, maybe it was just infant pain reliever -- your pharmacist can tell you) was the most common medication we used during the first year, for anything from an ear infection to teething discomfort etc.  A few bottle of that around is a good idea, you'll use it anyway I'm sure, but having a supply so that if SHTF you have some would be good.

Get his passport as soon as you get his SSN and birth certificate (and if you don't have one, get one for you and the wife) -- you never know when/if you might need to leave the country, and you won't be going anywhere without him!

If you have to bug out, consider where the baby will sleep.  It seems everyone gets one of the ubiquitous "Pack and Play" playpen type things (although really for us it was more of a "Pack and Sleep" because we rarely ever used it as a playpen).  They come in different sizes and with more/less bells and whistles.  I like I said, we rarely used it as a playpen, we kept it downstairs and it was a place for the baby to sleep (in the little bassinet part) downstairs for his naps, and when we traveled we used it as a bed for the baby.  I'd say get the most stripped-down, smallest version you can find.  Maybe it's not a dedicated part of your "preps" but I think it's good to consider part of your baby preps, because if you have to bug out to a hotel or relative's house or whatever, this is where the baby will likely sleep. 
http://www.amazon.com/Graco-Pack-Travel-Playard-Green/dp/B005UV0UEA/ref=sr_1_6?ie=UTF8&qid=1375372725&sr=8-6&keywords=pack+and+play+small


If this is your wife's first baby, I'll pass along this advice from personal experience: check around your area for any Le Leche League members, or lactation consultants.  One of the most stressful things for my wife (and so, for me too, to a lesser extent) was "getting the hang of it" with the nursing, and in those first sleepless, nervous, and apparently (for the mom) quite painful days after the baby is born, after you're home and on your own and struggling with the newness of everything it would be good to be able to offer your wife someone she could contact with questions, or who could visit to help her out with her technique, or just to give her some reassurance.  It might be something worthwhile for your wife to do before the baby arrives, reaching out to contact someone for an initial appointment or just to have spoken with someone and established contact just in case.  You could look like a prepper champ if she ends up needing it and you've researched it in advance and can give her some options or people to contact.

Does your baby monitor (I'm sure you'll get one, or have one) have the option to work with batteries?  We have this one and the digital DECT technology is the best at interference-free listening, and both the base station and the mobile listening unit have the option to run on AA batteries instead of outlet power.  Not necessarily life or death, and sure people survived thousands of years without baby monitors, but if you are in a short-term grid-down scenario like I was, it helps to be able to use batteries in these things.
http://www.amazon.com/Philips-AVENT-Basic-Monitor-Technology/dp/B001COIH3A/ref=sr_1_22?ie=UTF8&qid=1375373373&sr=8-22&keywords=baby+monitor

I see you have plans for air conditioning one room, that's good.  How about heat?  We could tough it out without heat, given enough clothing, but with a baby it's a different story.  Not sure how cold it gets where you are, but if you were in a short-term, grid down scenario where you couldn't leave (e.g. an ice storm) do you have a safe way to heat at least one room in your house?  After doing some research on it and having to put it in practice a few times, I have two backup heating options, a Big Buddy propane heater (and a stock of 1lb propane bottles that I store outside the house) and a kerosene heater with some kerosene that I store.

You guys planning on getting one of those Baby Bjorn type carriers?  You can't use if for the first few months I think, but after that, if you need to hit the road, it might be best to have a way to carry the baby and keep your hands free; not everywhere you might need to go is stroller-friendly.  On a related note, pick up a cheapo umbrella-travel stroller (they are like $20) -- they are the smallest, lightest strollers, the kind you would gate check at the airport, and if you had to bug out that's the stroller I would take.


Offline PrepperJim

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Re: New Baby Preps
« Reply #4 on: August 01, 2013, 04:02:41 PM »
First of all -- congratulations!  I have 3 little ones, and experienced a two-week power/heat/hot water outage during Sandy, when the youngest was 4 months, so I have some experience with baby prepping needs.

Thanks for all the great advice.

Add to the list: Sleep sack, changing pad, Similac, Tylenol, passport

I've got backup heat as well in the form of the gas furnace with electronics that can be powered by the generator, electric heaters and a propane Buddy.

We got a video monitor that plugs in. I can run that on backup power as well, but that does not solve the evac issue.

We are getting a baby carrier and already have a pack and play.

She's got the breast feeding thing covered. ;-) I am still going to get Similac just in case something happens and she cannot and the stores are closed.


Offline Charlie17

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Re: New Baby Preps
« Reply #5 on: August 02, 2013, 06:43:26 AM »
Congrats.  We have three little ones also.  a 3-year old and 1-year old twins. 

I am not a medical expert by any means, but my wife is a pediatric ER nurse and we always have baby Tylenol and Baby Motrin in the house.  Motrin is supposed to work better and is given every 6 hours and Tylenol can be given every 4 hours.  I think, but am not sure, that when both are given, they play off each other in a positive way for pain relief (especially helpful when teething).

Also, you might already know, but make sure no one sick comes around the baby for the first 6 weeks.  I vaguely remember, and I think it happened to my brothers kid, that if they get a fever higher that 101 and you take them to the docs/ER, they have to do a spinal tap to rule out meningitis.  Not fun.  Maybe someone can chime in to verify/correct this.  I'll talk to my wife again and try to update also.

Another thing.  I know its a little while away, but you might want to take advantage of fresh produce available now (and while you have time on your hands) to look into and make some baby food.  Just freeze it in ice cube trays and vacuum seal.  Check the web for recipes.  They range from simple to gourmet but you know exactly what you are feeding the little one.

Once again, congrats.

Offline PorcupineKate

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Re: New Baby Preps
« Reply #6 on: August 03, 2013, 09:25:44 AM »
Clove oil to relive teething. 

One car seat base for each vehicle you own.  This saves a lot of time and energy.

There are better baby slings than a baby bjorn. 

Some slings can have the baby's hips and neck in a less than idea position. There are better baby slings than a baby bjorn which can be hard on a babies hips. Many of my friends find the long wrap style slings to be more comfortable and handle a growing baby better.  It is worth taking the time research baby slings and carriers.
 



Offline Cedar

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Re: New Baby Preps
« Reply #7 on: August 03, 2013, 09:40:33 AM »
I loved the Mobi Wrap and then started to use an Ergo pack when SP got bigger. And still do.

Cedar

Offline PrepperJim

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Re: New Baby Preps
« Reply #8 on: August 04, 2013, 05:01:48 PM »
Made a trip to the grocery store to stealthily get some baby supplies along with the normal weekly grocery run. My wife got advice from a "lactation consultant" that having formula and bottles in the house provides an opportunity to give up on breast feeding. But the prepper in me needs an alternative to mom if the SHTF, mom is not available and the stores are closed. So, I picked up some Similac, bottles, two sets of nipples, pediatyte (powder and liquid), extra diapers, extra baby wipes, baby Tylenol and some other stuff. I separated all that stuff for bagging. When I got home, I almost got busted because she volunteered to help unload the car. I said, "nope, you can help put stuff away." Thankfully, she listened or I would have had to scramble to keep her from seeing the forbidden preps. Yikes! It was on par with buying another gun for the need for stealthiness. I even put the receipt in the bag with the baby stuff to prevent another way to get busted. ;-)

I still have other stuff to pick up, but at least I have some of it. Tomorrow, I can get it in the house and put up.

Offline Oregonprepper

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Re: New Baby Preps
« Reply #9 on: August 06, 2013, 01:32:25 AM »
An infinite supply of diapers is a good start.  Amazon mom is a great source for them. 

Also I never expected to go through so much ibuprofen and acetaminophen.  We buy bottles of the infant's and children's stuff in bulk at Costco lol.  Although I think in a pinch you could probably make your own children's stuff out of adult tablets that would probably last a lot longer.

A thermometer.

Books on what to do if baby has problems. 

I'd prepare for things that could go wrong with a baby.  Nothing is scarier than a really bad fever or a seizure or something along those lines.

Offline Cordovil

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Re: New Baby Preps
« Reply #10 on: August 06, 2013, 03:05:18 PM »
An infinite supply of diapers is a good start.  Amazon mom is a great source for them. 
...
Books on what to do if baby has problems. 
...
I'd prepare for things that could go wrong with a baby.  Nothing is scarier than a really bad fever or a seizure or something along those lines.

Good call on all of these.

If you have to bug out, you're going to want to make sure you have enough diapers to last you a week or so until you get settled in your new location.  Even a moderate disaster like Sandy can close down the normal retail networks for a week or two.

Definitely get a good baby medical book (or two); we had one I remember from Dr. Sears I think it was, and I referred to that many times.

Also, I just remembered that my wife took a child-focused first aid / CPR course at the local Red Cross.  I should have done so as well, but full disclosure I didn't.  At least she is the one who spends most of the time with the kids, though. 

I just thought of something else too: if you have any, um, non-standard medications that are part of your long-term grid-down preps (e.g. aquarium antibiotics, potassium iodide for nuclear hazards, etc.) see if you can figure out the dosage requirements for everyone in your family, including the baby, ahead of time, and write it all down.  Update it annually.  That way, if you need to access those preps in a grid down scenario, you already have the information at your fingertips and won't need to figure it out under stress, or when many resources (like the internet) would be unavailable to you.


Offline MississippiJarhead

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Re: New Baby Preps
« Reply #11 on: August 07, 2013, 02:53:16 AM »
But the prepper in me needs an alternative to mom if the SHTF, mom is not available and the stores are closed.
Good plan, you can always donate the Simlac one the baby gets past that point. Heck if things were really bad an adult could drink it *gag*.

My Wife is breast feeding our 8 week old daughter. We have not needed a backup but it did cross my mind.

We had a diaper genie with our boys (now 2.5 and 4.5). They're good for little bottle or breast fed babies but once they start on real food they're practically useless, IMO. Older kids only tend to poop once a day. So, we used those cheap store brand bread bags from WalMart and then they go straight into a can outside.

Offline PrepperJim

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Re: New Baby Preps
« Reply #12 on: August 07, 2013, 09:24:15 AM »
Thanks for all the good advice everyone!!!

Offline OptimusMom

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Re: New Baby Preps
« Reply #13 on: August 07, 2013, 10:42:07 AM »
I have two small sons who routinely like to get sick. There is a limit on how early you can give babies Motrin - I think it has to do with their blood platelets. Also, when my three year old contracted roseola and my five year old contracted Hand, Foot, and Mouth disease (at the same time), their pediatrician said that while they used to advise alternating Tylenol and Motrin, they don't anymore because it can do some damage to the liver. The only time they advise alternating them is in the case of extrememly high fevers (my three year old ran almost a 105 temp). I would also suggest gas/colic drops just in case. I think it's called Gripe Water and they sell it at Walgreen's. It worked pretty well for my oldest. Congratulations!