Author Topic: Food prices increasing, possible shortages (merged topics)  (Read 379506 times)

endurance

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Re: Food prices increasing, possible shortages (merged topics)
« Reply #150 on: December 06, 2010, 07:57:26 PM »
On the other side of things, I just noticed that basic white rice at Costco has gone down since last year.  Last year it was $0.42/pound for the 50 pound bag, right now it's $0.365/pound.  I blew it and missed their Jasmine rice.  They only seem to carry it once a year, but that's primarily what I eat.  Well, I still have 100 pounds left, so I just might have to hit the reserves.  After that I'm down to 150 pounds of white and 40 pounds of Basmati. ;)

Offline Morning Sunshine

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Re: Food prices increasing, possible shortages (merged topics)
« Reply #151 on: December 06, 2010, 08:23:05 PM »
I haven't tried Jasmine.... you say it is better than basmati?  hmm... might have to try it.

we have some 200lbs of basmati and about 80 of brown.  I have been mixing them 2 parts basmati to 1 part brown, and no one is complaining about the brown like they did when I tried it straight.

*note - I bought the brown before I discovered it doesn't store long periods.  I have 1 6-gal bucket sealed in mylar with oxy absorbers.  We'll see how that works when I open it in about a year.  by then it will be 4 years old.

Offline NWBowhunter

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Re: Food prices increasing, possible shortages (merged topics)
« Reply #152 on: December 06, 2010, 08:38:11 PM »
About a year go was the manufactured rice shortage. With all kinds of MSM articles about shortages that drove rpices up.

Offline hillclimber

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Re: Food prices increasing, possible shortages (merged topics)
« Reply #153 on: December 08, 2010, 02:20:08 PM »
At the "bulk store" I noticed some of my usual stuff was missing. Canned potatoes, cous cous, can't remember what else.

endurance

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Re: Food prices increasing, possible shortages (merged topics)
« Reply #154 on: December 09, 2010, 04:23:12 PM »
I haven't tried Jasmine.... you say it is better than basmati?  hmm... might have to try it.
Jasmine is what you usually get in Asian food resturants and why it's sooo much better than the stuff most folks have at home.  Great tasting stuff.  You can pick it up by the small bags in the grocery stores to try it, then buy in bulk when you fall in love with it.

Offline LdMorgan

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Re: China's Food Prices Spike, Officials Fear Unrest. . .
« Reply #155 on: December 15, 2010, 07:08:38 AM »
Great Britain is presently entering a micro-Ice Age, brought on in part by disruption of the Gulf Stream that became evident last June. The Brits are already starting to run short of some foods, and agriculture is looking pretty shaky in many areas.

Ditto for China. The Northern provinces are reeling from massive blizzards and sand storms. All agriculture there is severly endangered.

The spikes in food prices, and the recent price freezes and government intervention merely presage a severe famine. Britain, China, just pick a place: it's the same process everywhere.

If the US exports food to China (or any where else) to relieve their hunger, we'll be importing famine at the same time, and will be doing some hungering ourselves. We, too, are a net food importer.

It's time and past time to learn a few lessons from Cuba.



 

Offline dep190

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World Food Prices Rise to Record on Sugar, Meat Costs
« Reply #156 on: January 05, 2011, 09:19:44 AM »
This Article is interesting considering the Jump in fuel and grocery prices as of late!

World food prices rose to a record in December on higher sugar, grain and oilseed costs, the United Nations said, exceeding levels reached in 2008 that sparked deadly riots from Haiti to Egypt

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011-01-05/global-food-prices-climb-to-record-on-cereal-sugar-costs-un-agency-says.html

Offline Roknrandy

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Global food prices hit record high
« Reply #157 on: January 05, 2011, 07:21:00 PM »
Food prices hit a record high last month, surpassing the levels seen during the 2007-08 crisis, the UN's Food and Agricultural Organisation said on Wednesday.   more at the link below
http://edition.cnn.com/2011/BUSINESS/01/05/food.prices.ft/index.html?hpt=Sbin

Offline BatonRouge Bill

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Re: Food prices increasing, possible shortages (merged topics)
« Reply #158 on: January 08, 2011, 08:17:31 PM »
A name brand can of whole kernal corn at Wally World today....$.96 :o
Starting to see the larger price jumps now.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-z0CU_tXpD0#

Offline Bradbn4

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Re: Food prices increasing, possible shortages (merged topics)
« Reply #159 on: January 08, 2011, 08:56:45 PM »
Good clip - my ahh - this is a bit high was at least 6 months ago I went to Mc'D for two egg Mc'Muffins with sausage + one of those premium ice coffees. 

After have them repeat the price I said ok  and that was the last time I went there.
I think the price was around 9 dollars - and well, I know a dozen eggs + a dozen English muffins cost less.  And today I get my coffee via one of the small instant packages.  Not the best, but one meal that way is more than a weeks worth making it myself.

Oh, and I dropped the sausage from my version - and go with a better quality cheese. 

I expect the price to go up at least another 20%  - I base my guess on how silver is doing. 

Brad

Thox Spuddy

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Re: Food prices increasing, possible shortages (merged topics)
« Reply #160 on: January 08, 2011, 09:13:39 PM »
When I opened up the tub of butter mix I thought "they didn't fill it up all the way". No they didn't. The previously 16oz is now 15oz at same price.

nkawtg

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Re: Food prices increasing, possible shortages (merged topics)
« Reply #161 on: January 08, 2011, 09:18:20 PM »
Yes, we've been noticing the same thing. Quantities are decreasing and prices are going up.
Lower quantities at the same price is a defacto price increase.

Offline chrisdfw

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Re: Food prices increasing, possible shortages (merged topics)
« Reply #162 on: January 08, 2011, 11:09:53 PM »
Food is becoming more a concern for me. For the prior year the political tension and economic problems had me thinking a lot more about social unrest, and I focused on that. Now I have committed to spending 200 a month increasing food storage.

I worry a little about fuel as well, but there is little I can do other than be ready... can't store 1000 gallons of gasoline and diesel in the backyard.

Offline daved

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Re: Food prices increasing, possible shortages (merged topics)
« Reply #163 on: January 09, 2011, 07:07:38 AM »
The latest price increase I saw at work is even sneakier than just cutting the size of the package. The package size actually increased, but the price went up too. Of course the price per ounce is now higher than it used to be.

endurance

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Re: Food prices increasing, possible shortages (merged topics)
« Reply #164 on: January 09, 2011, 07:56:36 AM »
I noticed last night my usual bottle of wine went up by a dollar.  Ouch, that's hittin' a guy where it hurts!

Offline soccer grannie

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Re: Food prices increasing, possible shortages (merged topics)
« Reply #165 on: January 09, 2011, 08:25:01 AM »
A little nostalgia: In the early 70s beef prices were very reasonable. Then out of nowhere and for no reason other than greed, beef prices went through the roof. I remember something about the government wanting to intervene but housewives across the country quickly remedied the problem -- we did not buy beef -- we bought chicken, pork and fish and had meatless dinners a couple of nights a week. Since meat is a perishable item, it didn't take long for the price to come down.

My thinking is if it is an item you can do without and the price skyrockets, buy a substitute.

The consumers won then and I don't see why we can't do it again, especially with perishable food items.

nkawtg

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Re: Food prices increasing, possible shortages (merged topics)
« Reply #166 on: January 09, 2011, 11:26:33 AM »
An excellent strategy if the price increase was on one or two items, but these increases are across the board. Our only hedge against this are those of us who had the foresight to build up a reserve either by canning, storing, or both.

Offline kiteflyer

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Re: Food prices increasing, possible shortages (merged topics)
« Reply #167 on: January 11, 2011, 11:08:56 AM »
Bushel of Corn way up today because of drought in Argentina,oil also up 1.50 q barrel this morning.

         kiteflyer


      http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011-01-11/corn-futures-advance-as-dry-weather-stresses-argentina-crop-soybeans-gain.html

endurance

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Re: Food prices increasing, possible shortages (merged topics)
« Reply #168 on: January 11, 2011, 04:15:03 PM »
I'm really intrigued as I learn about various alternative grains.  I was just listening to a podcast somewhere that brought up how much more drought resistant blue corn was vs. sweet corn.  I've also been looking into Chia and Quinoa.  I already use Chia seeds in my water bottles (natural source of omega 3s & 6s, along with electrolytes) and I've heard great things about the hardiness of Quinoa.  Between that and Jack's favorite, Amaranth, there are grains that we can all grow with minimal input that improve our resiliance in the event of a global food shortage.

Offline hanzel

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Re: Food prices increasing, possible shortages (merged topics)
« Reply #169 on: January 11, 2011, 08:49:29 PM »
A little nostalgia: In the early 70s beef prices were very reasonable. Then out of nowhere and for no reason other than greed, beef prices went through the roof. I remember something about the government wanting to intervene but housewives across the country quickly remedied the problem -- we did not buy beef -- we bought chicken, pork and fish and had meatless dinners a couple of nights a week. Since meat is a perishable item, it didn't take long for the price to come down.

My thinking is if it is an item you can do without and the price skyrockets, buy a substitute.

The consumers won then and I don't see why we can't do it again, especially with perishable food items.

IMHO I disagree with your nostalgia.  I remember 70's also but remember Nixon took us off the gold standard and the dollar started its free fall.  Then we had Carter and his WIN buttons and slogans of driving 55, turning the thermostat to 72 and .. cleaning your plate to save food dollars, while the federal reserve cranked up the printers.  Why was it the ranchers "greed" that the US government devalued the dollar ? You may not understand that in an inflationary period not all prices raise at the same levels at the same time, just because the cost of item A increases today, item B now based on items A new price may take a week before its price must be increased.  By boycotting the meat until a lower price can be had only leaves you with rotten meat, and now you must replace the cost of the meat and pass it on somewhere.  You may wish to try the substitution route but I dont.  I have already seen to many, american jobs substituted for indian jobs, american goods substituted by chinese goods.  Seeing I can get these new items now at lower cost, I am lowering inflation and saving the country.

Thox Spuddy

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Re: Food prices increasing, possible shortages (merged topics)
« Reply #170 on: January 13, 2011, 07:30:36 PM »
this is getting interesting, terrifyingly interesting:
Obama Orders Military To Prepare For Spring Food Riots

http://www.eutimes.net/2011/01/obama-orders-military-to-prepare-for-spring-food-riots/

Offline chrisdfw

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Re: Food prices increasing, possible shortages (merged topics)
« Reply #171 on: January 13, 2011, 09:57:21 PM »
Every day that goes by I believe more and more that food is going to be more and more of an issue, possibly in the near future.

I stocked the pantry with an extra 25 pounds of rice and 10 pounds of pasta to put away for long term and made sure that I have
a full month of everything I use that isn't perishable. Tomorrow I stock up on the frozen meat. At least 30-40 pounds of beef and chicken.
Maybe some canned meat if I can find a deal.

Offline chrisdfw

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Re: China's Food Prices Spike, Officials Fear Unrest. . .
« Reply #172 on: January 13, 2011, 10:00:43 PM »
If the US exports food to China (or any where else) to relieve their hunger, we'll be importing famine at the same time, and will be doing some hungering ourselves. We, too, are a net food importer.


We are only a net importer because we give away our food for free or near free as aid, and yet we buy the food we bring in.

We also export cheap food like race and grains, and buy expensive wines, cheeses, seafood, etc.

We produce more than enough to feed ourselves, only on a dollar basis are we a net importer, on a calorie or volume basis we have more than we eat.

Offline Sweethearts Mom

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Re: Food prices increasing, possible shortages (merged topics)
« Reply #173 on: January 13, 2011, 10:14:56 PM »
Could the increasing prices of food actually be a result of supply and demand since more people are being encouraged by our government to "prepare"? Could the prepping mentality lately in state and federal emergency orgs simply be a last ditch effort to cause people to spend money they would normally hang on to which in turn causes high demand which in turn causes prices to go up? Just a thought.

Offline OKGranny

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Re: Food prices increasing, possible shortages (merged topics)
« Reply #174 on: January 13, 2011, 10:36:49 PM »
I don't think so SHM, I checked the gov sites 2-3 weeks ago just to see what they are saying and they are recommending people have a whopping 2 weeks worth of food. If people are following gov regs it shouldn't affect pricing much. I can't imagine just having 2 weeks worth of food, I have more than that in my kitchen cupboards that aren't even a part of my preps.

OldManSchmidt

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Re: Food prices increasing, possible shortages (merged topics)
« Reply #175 on: January 14, 2011, 12:15:42 AM »
I think it might have an impact, just not this much.  To put it in perspective by playing with the numbers, the US has a population of roughly 308 million.  Let us conservatively assume that roughly 10% of the population is of a similar mindset to us and round the number off at 31 million.  Let us further assume that at the other end of the spectrum there is another roughly 10% that have essentially empty refrigerators, call it 31 million as well.  We'll place the rest of the population somewhere in the middle and say that they have somewhere between 1 week and 1 month of food on hand.

If these numbers are even close to true, that leaves roughly 31 million people who might panic.  Of those, let's get adventurous and say half of those actually listen to the warnings.  That leaves 15.5 million people who have empty cupboards and a desire to change their situation. 
Each day's worth of stores at 2 meals a day those people purchase represents a total food purchase of 31 million meals worth of food.  It doesn't sound like much in the grand scheme of things, but in our JIT supply chain that is set up to minimize loss due to spoilage, 31 million meals is significant.  Now what if the numbers held true across the board with the exception of people like us who are already stocked up well beyond 2 weeks?  Take us out of the mix and we have roughly 277 million people.  Half of those purchasing to build up the pantry would represent 277 million meals worth of food per day they increase their stores.  Increases in those numbers would really do a number on supply.

Now even if this is all similar to reality, the hit to the supply chain would be real and significant, but short lived.  What's more, many of these people would have a "what have I done" moment as soon as they got home with the goods and would simply live off them for the next 2 weeks.  During that time, they would buy little and then go back to their old shopping habits...whatever those might be.

No, I think there is real potential of supply shortages.  I also think part of the problem can be traced back to farm subsidies.  When it is more profitable to leave land fallow than to put it in production, it would require a fool or a person with an exceptional grasp of the future to plant that ground anyway.  Add to that, there has been no real incentive to add significant storage capacity for foodstuffs in the past.  Part of the reason the farmers don't grow more is that there literally is no place to put it at harvest and no place to sell it without the bottom dropping out of the prices.  Oh sure, the 3rd world could really use the food, but who's going to pay for it.  Let's face facts.  From those like us who plant home gardens to the family farm to Monsanto and ADM, nobody does it purely for charity.  We do it for the supply and cost saving advantages and the professional growers at all levels do it for their living.  We might all of us give away part of our harvest for various reasons, but not nearly as much as we keep or sell respectively.

Offline kiteflyer

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Food Protests in Jordan and Riots in The Middle East
« Reply #176 on: January 14, 2011, 09:23:51 AM »


     Soon to come to The USA,the signs are popping up everywhere.Muni bonds to default,states raising taxes by double digits and slashing services into the meat and bone.I suspect by summer riots will be here in The USA. We are not immune to stupid politicians,energy shortages and home mortgages defaults pushing families into the streets. Have a nice day! ;) Get prepared!

                 kiteflyer

       http://af.reuters.com/article/worldNews/idAFTRE70D3AQ20110114

        http://gulfnews.com/opinions/columnists/poverty-a-major-worry-for-arab-world-1.745357

Offline The Professor

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Global food chain stretched to the limit Soaring prices spark fears of social u
« Reply #177 on: January 14, 2011, 09:47:25 AM »
From MSNBC: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/41062817/ns/business-consumer_news

Exerpt:

"We are entering a danger territory," Abdolreza Abbassian, chief economist at the U.N.'s Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), said last week.

The Professor

amanadoo

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Note how they say Americans and others are better off because we eat more processed foods then goes on to say that food shortages are a good thing because it means that standards of living are improving.

Ulgh. EAT MORE MONSANTO-MADE CRAP, YOU'LL BE BETTER OFF. "They" keep the poor of the world under their thumb, one way or another.

Offline womule

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Re: Food Protests in Jordan and Riots in The Middle East
« Reply #179 on: January 14, 2011, 11:23:55 AM »
I tend to agree with what you said except I don't expect to see food riots in the USA so soon. If prices start getting that high we will stop exporting like russia has.

Then congress will halt grains being used for biofuels.

My concern is, what pressure will the world put on us to keep us from cutting exports?  Who would be willing to go to war over food?  China has a lot of mouths to feed, how would they react when we stop exporting food to them?