Survivalism & Self Sufficiency Topics > COVID-19 Coronavirus Pandemic

COVID-19 Lessons Learned (for preppers or not)

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Greekman:
I know that Lessons Learned are for the end of the event, but I noticed that if one does not keep a diary, tend to forget many of the bits of the wider picture. I do for the sake of my blog, so here are my notes related to an international outlook.

Normalcy Bias is all so Powerful!
Judging by personal reaction I knew it would come, but fooled myself it would take a while.

We live inside the SHTF, but unless we see people dropping in the streets we cannot grasp it.

The world health system is not made and geared for Epidemics.
All over the world the health system fell short of supplies, even basic PPE. Even virus-focused research was curtailed, despite voices that spoke of an inevitable pandemic sometime in the near future. It seems that managers used low statistical possibilities to curtail spending.

Our hospitals are not made and geared for Epidemics.
Even the building themselves are not made to service contagious diseases.
I have noticed that there is a common ER area, with no provisions for alternate/isolated entrances, sections and lifts.
(i.e. in Greece we had to move the blood donor service outside the hospital's compounds)
Studies show that the the virus was also found in the sick persons' rooms ventilation system, potentially creating cruiser-ship conditions, for lack of non-opening windows.

This SHTF is all about material supplies. The lack of. Be aware, be prepared. Differentiate your stocks.

A prolonged quarantine needs strong doses of variety. Especially of food and tastes. lots of alcohol too.

Chemsoldier:
I think the FDA needs to look at shelf life extension for medical equipment.  At the moment, my understanding is that manufacturers determine their own expiration dates.  They print the same ones on equipment destined to sit on a shelf in a temperature controlled storeroom and ones that will be in the back of an ambulance parked outside.  Perhaps keep the same system (manufacturer provided dates) but dictate that it needs to have different dates for different conditions and set a standard for those conditions.  We have been doing this for years with MREs.  If equipment stays good longer when well stored, facilities are more likely to keep a deeper stock.

As a prepper:
We are seeing an increasing number of small communities trying to keep people out.  A county in Colorado is considering roadblocking the roads in.  More often reported is general hostile feelings towards weekender type property owners.  This is probably something to keep in mind for BOL owners. 
Additional:  While TSHTF, for many of us work has not stopped that would allow us to bug out.  Normal home preps are as important as ever.

Can we leverage software?  I really could use an inventory program that lets me check in food to my home storage.  I would also like it to track expiration date and remind me that things are coming up on expiration.  I would also like to be able to program in often used recipes so I could ask the program things like, "I want to make this recipe, do I need to buy anything?"  "I have these ingredients I need to use, what can I make with it and what else do I need to get from strorage."  I would value that efficiency more than I care about OPSEC considerations ("Oh god no! If you put the inventory on your computer the NSA will know!").  I would rather externalize it into software than spend enough time living the recipes and inventory to internalize it.

Guns:  Glad I have them and have increased my protective posture.  The fragility created by this crisis will make it more likely to need them in the immediate future.  However, I am surprised how little disorder we have seen thus far.  I always thought that something this different than normal life would have caused greater civil unrest and crime than we have seen so far.
That said I had let certain things lapse and will readdress in the future.  A case in point.  I used my plate carrier from work in doing personal PT in my garage.  I have left it down there previously out of laziness.  It is up next to the long gun safe now where I can grab it.  I may even buy an aftermarket airsoft grade plate carrier and non-ballistic weight plates for PT so I dont have the moral hazard of using my real armor.

David in MN:
Well the thing that hits me is that I kinda sorta thought this couldn't happen. I find it almost a "lop their heads off" criminal act that the FDA and CDC might as well have been staffed with chimpanzees huffing spray paint (my favorite flavor is gold). That said, as I take the long view leading up to the 2008 financial crisis the SEC was about the same as they held meetings to discuss their favorite pornography. So I'm very sour on our regulators who cost me money and provide virtually nothing and in fact the paint huffing chimps would at least be fun to watch so they have a leg up on our experts.

I did learn the value of prepping, even at a mundane level. When we cancelled our vacation my wife vocalized that she felt more secure at home. That was, in no small part, due to the food preps and the knowledge that we could string  it out a few months in relative comfort. We had the necessities and for a while in uncertain times that was a really good feeling.

I'll be blunt and say the armory is comforting. Not that I have any need but it is comforting. That runs the gamut from my .338 sniper rifle to collapsable batons. They are un-needed but provide a lot of "it's OK" vibe.

The one thing that really hit me as an unprepped thing is morale. I have been calling and texting everyone in my family (not a normal behavior for me) just to keep things going. It helps to hear a familiar voice. But there have been heartbreaks. I had to listen to my mom cry about being so alone and that her only solace was that her mom died last year and missed this. My sister stopped taking my calls when she got laid off. We have a troubled history and she can't stand not being the dominant sibling.

There was an odd prep that really has stood out. I have a zipper travel backgammon board. Both my wife and I are avid backgammon players but within that board I keep 2 decks of cards, 6 dice, a notepad, and a pencil. It goes on every vacation with us and boy having that distraction really helps.

Chemsoldier:

--- Quote from: David in MN on April 10, 2020, 03:44:54 PM ---There was an odd prep that really has stood out. I have a zipper travel backgammon board. Both my wife and I are avid backgammon players but within that board I keep 2 decks of cards, 6 dice, a notepad, and a pencil. It goes on every vacation with us and boy having that distraction really helps.

--- End quote ---

Yeah, for us it is puzzles.  They were not even a prep, but all the puzzles we have been keeping have paid off in a big way.

My wife and I have been playing cards.  Spite and Malice mostly.  Ultimate win will be teaching the kids (youngest is eight) Euchre.

EDIT:  Oh, and cribbage!  I gotta get out the cribbage board.

Carver:
I love the game of "GO" but can't play it with my wife as she stops to think over every move.

--- Quote ---There was an odd prep that really has stood out. I have a zipper travel backgammon board. Both my wife and I are avid backgammon players but within that board I keep 2 decks of cards, 6 dice, a notepad, and a pencil. It goes on every vacation with us and boy having that distraction really helps.
--- End quote ---
I have a hunch about this game that I will try someday; what if each player used the same roll of dice for every move. This would remove the element of chance so that the winner would be entirely determined by skill.
If so, wouldn't the more skillful player win every game?

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