Survivalism & Self Sufficiency Topics > Amateur Radio Gear Reviews

MFJ-207 Antenna Analyzer

(1/3) > >>

Alan Georges:
Continuing MFJ’s fine tradition of “good enough for the job and not one bit better, and at a fair price too,” this is their budget antenna analyzer.  The main points about it are that it works, but doesn’t have super resolution.  Pick a frequency band, twist the frequency tuning knob, and read the SWR, it couldn’t be simpler.  But the frequency scale is kind of crude, so you’re not  going to get anything really dead-on.  There is an output for a frequency counter which might help some, but the frequency adjustment knob scale can be pretty coarse at various band edges.  The chief thing is that this device will get you into the ballpark on antenna tuning without breaking the bank.  One more joker in the deck: it doesn’t come with a power supply, just a 12V input jack.  (The web site says it can use a 9V battery or 110VAC, what the heck?)  Luckily an AC adapter off of an old cell phone worked.

Here’s a link to the manufacturer’s site: http://www.mfjenterprises.com/Product.php?productid=MFJ-207

armymars:
  I have one of the MFJ antenna analyzer that cost me $80 dollars. I take a post a note and make a new scale for the band I need using my ham receiver. This is good enough for checking out the antenna at the antenna for the band in question. 

Carl:
I have ,and often use,a MFJ 259 analyzer...but unless you plan a lot of time designing and experimenting with antennas...I mostly cut wire to length and let the auto antenna tuner do the job of protecting the radio. You need a tuner ,whether you use an analyzer or not.

armymars:
  If an analyzer can tell you how much and what kind of reactance is at the antenna, you can compensate for it. Cut the length per formula then find the resonate freq. with the analyzer. Now multiply the new freq. with the length and you have the new number to calculate the right length. Not for just this antenna, but others in the same location. Remember to subtract 5% for inverted "V".   

Greekman:

--- Quote from: armymars on February 03, 2015, 06:06:30 PM ---  If an analyzer can tell you how much and what kind of reactance is at the antenna, you can compensate for it. Cut the length per formula then find the resonate freq. with the analyzer. Now multiply the new freq. with the length and you have the new number to calculate the right length. Not for just this antenna, but others in the same location. Remember to subtract 5% for inverted "V".

--- End quote ---

qot a question...is that -5% peculiar to the inverted V dipole?

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

Go to full version