Survivalism & Self Sufficiency Topics > Homesteading and Self Reliant Living

Staple products found in our childhood kitchens, bathrooms, garages, etc

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Oil Lady:
Thanks for all these awesome replies! :)

I want to respond to each of them as efficiently as possible. Here are the replies so far in the order of their postings.

ONE CAVEAT: I am not looking for suggestions on TOOLS. Instead I am looking for suggestions on CONSUMABLES -- the kind of stuff you use up and have to buy new all the time. Tools are things you will buy only once and (hopefully) have for a life time. But Listerine and ichthammol ointment is stuff you repeatedly run out of and have to buy new bottles/tubes of.


--- Quote from: Mountain State Prepper on June 13, 2015, 07:17:52 AM ---
I always remember our medicine cabinet with the following too...


tri-fold sling  (actually under the sink)
ace bandage  (actually under the sink)
bandaids of various sizes
eye patch
eye wash cup
tweezers this is a tool
scissors this is a tool
magnifying glass this is a tool
razor and shaving cream, brut 33 or old spice
brylcreem (a little dab will do ya), dad actually was partial to Wildroot!
comb and brush these are tools
sea-bond

We always had  vics vapo-rub too.

--- End quote ---
   

These are good! I especially like the Vics Vapo-rub! :)







--- Quote from: nkawtg on June 13, 2015, 07:35:43 AM ---LAUNDRY ROOM
- Soap flakes
- Bleach
- Starch (for ironing)
- Kerosene (a good stain lifter, but keep it away from the dryer!)
- Washing Soda
-
-
tool

POTTING SHED
- Shovel, spade tools
- Rake tool
- Hoe tool
- Trowel tool
-


WORKBENCH
- 3-in-One Oil (brand name for a multi-use machine oil)
- Kerosene
- Turpentine
- Denatured Alcohol
- Mineral Spirits
-

--- End quote ---


I forgot about mineral spirits! :) 







--- Quote from: TexDaddy on June 13, 2015, 08:07:39 AM ---To add to the work bench list,

My Dad worked in the oil field and he worked on the car and the lawn mover and such so he always had a waterless hand cleaner such as this to get the oil and grease off of his hands.



--- End quote ---


Sounds good --but it isn't "old school." :) Every modern work bench definitely needs this product -- and a bar of Lava soap too. But is there an old school method of de-greasing your hands that we can ALSO add tothe list alongside this Goop stuff?? (Not excluding the Goop from the list at all. But the main thrust of this exercise is to reclaim lost knowledge.)







--- Quote from: Mountain State Prepper on June 13, 2015, 08:08:17 AM ---
More Workbench..

Boiled Linseed Oil
WD-40
Acetone

--- End quote ---


Awesome! :) 







--- Quote from: r_w on June 13, 2015, 08:08:52 AM ---Bag balm.  In the medicine cabinet, work bench, and laundry room (for after using the hard lye soap all morning)

Hard lye soap, simple lye and lard with too much lye as a stain scrubber. 

Iodine.

--- End quote ---


I have iodine already listed. ;)

And I have definitely heard the wonders of Bag Balm sung by others.

Meanwhile, are you delineating several different categories of lye soap here? Can you clarify??   







--- Quote from: Mountain State Prepper on June 13, 2015, 08:27:39 AM ---Laundry Room:

woolite

--- End quote ---


Definitely! need that Woolite! :) 







--- Quote from: bcksknr on June 13, 2015, 02:16:38 PM ---     We used to have a product called "Oil-O-Sol". It was a pale yellow oil that I now realize had an odor of Linseed oil and pine.  When I got a sliver that was too deep to dig out, My mother would put on a bandaid , with the pad soaked in the stuff and by the next day, the sliver had "drawn" to the surface and could be pulled out with a tweezer. Worked every time. No longer available, I made up some linseed oil and thinned it with a little turpentine. It works just as well. Never got infected either.

--- End quote ---


Good to know! :)







--- Quote from: r_w on June 13, 2015, 03:05:03 PM ---
--- Quote from: bcksknr on June 13, 2015, 02:16:38 PM ---     We used to have a product called "Oil-O-Sol". It was a pale yellow oil that I now realize had an odor of Linseed oil and pine.  When I got a sliver that was too deep to dig out, My mother would put on a bandaid , with the pad soaked in the stuff and by the next day, the sliver had "drawn" to the surface and could be pulled out with a tweezer. Worked every time. No longer available, I made up some linseed oil and thinned it with a little turpentine. It works just as well. Never got infected either.

--- End quote ---

We had something called Iodex for that.  Drawing salve with iodine in it.  It is still available but not the same as it used to be :(

--- End quote ---


Good info because is can help us all crack the code of what makes for a good drawing salve. :)







--- Quote from: Frugal Upstate on June 13, 2015, 05:49:52 PM ---Asprin

--- End quote ---

I don't understand how I could forget such a basic product!  :facepalm: :) 








--- Quote from: mountainmoma on June 13, 2015, 06:43:53 PM ---Fels Naptha soap. I still have this, but they have changed the formulation. Probably was used for stains, but the main use for me growing up was to wash with when exposed to poison oak. Still works for this, at least better than regulat soap.

--- End quote ---



--- Quote from: bcksknr on June 13, 2015, 08:27:06 PM ---     When I was teaching art, Fels Naptha bar soap was often the only thing that would get oil paint out of clothing. It was also great for washing paint residue out of fine brushes. it would often bring back a hardened brush to a usable state.

--- End quote ---

Sounds like Fels Naptha is something a lot of moms would like to have on hand! :)








--- Quote from: Knecht on June 13, 2015, 06:58:34 PM ---Workbench:
technical gasolene (cleaning, degreasing, dissolving various stuff such as beeswax)
hide glue (granulated)
graphite powder
soapstone powder
colophony resin
beeswax

--- End quote ---



 8)










--- Quote from: TheRetiredRancher on June 14, 2015, 07:33:00 AM ---Workbench:
Soapstone stick for marking
Carpenter's pencil

--- End quote ---



I'm gonna say these are NOT "tools" because they don't have the potential to last a lifetime as a one-time-purchase between now and your 90th birthday. :) You'll be buying more than a few of these over the next 50 years. So these are keepers. :)

TexDaddy:
Goop is fairly old school, "America‚Äôs Premium Multi-purpose Hand Cleaner Since 1949!."  ;)

http://goophandcleaner.com/

ETA... and Woolite did not show up until 1951. "Woolite dates back to 1951." http://www.woolite.us/our-heritage/

TheRetiredRancher:
All it takes to make a good drawing salve is pitch from pines, spruces, and firs.  Any single one will work but the old salve we had in the medicine cabinet was a mixture of 4 or 5 varieties. The pitch from the southwestern Pinion pine works very well.

AnnsSolo:
Cleaning closet (and Christmas0

glass wax - I have no idea what it's made of, but we used it to make window decorations with stencils, then mom would clean the windows in January.

bcksknr:
     Bars of LAVA brand handsoap. It had pumice in it (hence the name) and was a fairly abrasive scrub. It took most any kind of soil off your hands and seemed to leave them softer as well as clean. Maybe worked as an exfoliant.

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