Armory, Self Defense, And EDC > General Ammo, Reloading, Bullet Casting, & Ammo Craft

press recommendations

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DrJohn:
For low volume I would go with a RCBS rock chucker, for higher volume the Dillon XL650.  I would rather cry once, then each time I use the equipment...

Skispcs:
I think that the LEE turret press is great for a beginner. You need to learn how to do each step correctly.  A progressive like the Dillon is too much for a first time reloader in my opinion.
One of the problems with a single position press is that you need to replace and adjust the dies every time. With the Lee turret you can set up the dies and leave them. Time to change calibers, pull out the turret and pop the new one.
Once you are comfortable with reloading one at a time then move to the progressives.
I still use one of my older presses for decapping.

DDJ:
I use a Lee 4 hole Turret and it quickly and repeatable switches between calibers.  I run 3 on a regular basis and 3 others on occasion.  I did day one pull the auto index feature so I could run it like a single stage.  I have yet to put it back. 

I do not like the consistency of the powder measure (the Auto Disk) it throws the powders I am using at more variation than I like or the books call for.  This requires me to do 100% measurement. this causes me to spend a LOT of time a t the press to reload (50 rounds an hour).  If you stay with the Auto disk I would recommend the $10 upgrade to the micrometer adjuster which allow you to adjust your powder volume on the fly with out a lot of disassembly.

Carl:

--- Quote from: DDJ on October 03, 2016, 11:17:54 AM ---  If you stay with the Auto disk I would recommend the $10 upgrade to the micrometer adjuster which allow you to adjust your powder volume on the fly with out a lot of disassembly.

--- End quote ---

But did you find the adjustable measure and more consistent?
I still use an RCBS measure for consistency when not loading on a production machine like Dillon or AMMOLOAD.

Smurf Hunter:
I have the basic Lee anniversary kit that was just over $100 a few years back.  I load a weird variety of stuff.
Sometimes it's higher volume blasting ammo, some times a few carefully weighed charges for accuracy.

Many progressive presses don't lend themselves well to frequent cartridge changes.  There are many factors of course. 

Because I have only a single stage, I do each step in batches (no turret).  So I'll resize a few hundred. 
Then while my wife is watching TV, I'll hand prime all those on the sofa.

Depending on the cartridge, I may leave some quantity in that resized+primed state.  Maybe I don't know the application, and will decide the charge and bullet type later.

When you have all that prepped and primed brass, charging and seating on a single stage is fast.  I use a standalone powder dropper, and then move the cartridge into the press for seating.
In the event I need a crimp, I just do the full batch again using that die.

In aggregate I don't think it takes more time following my process. The trick is to have a large batch size, to get the benefits of economy of scale.

If my main purpose for reloading was to make large quantities for a given cartridge/load for competition, then the RCBS progressives are a sure win.  But my shooting needs are too diverse at the moment.

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