Armory, Self Defense, And EDC > General Ammo, Reloading, Bullet Casting, & Ammo Craft

press recommendations

<< < (3/8) > >>

hackmeister:
Dillon 550.

Carl:
While I agree in the superiority of the Dillon 550B ,I think now as he is a NEW RELOADER, he may learn better on a single stage,
ONE DIE at a time press as the setup of dies and such on a progressive press can be tough for a new operator.
The LEE turret can be a good press as it can operate as a single stage press ,if desired and loading 'one step at a time' will increase his odds of success.
I actually started with a set of high tech LEE HAND TOOLS where you use a plastic hammer to HAMMER the shell into the dies.
Slowing down the process and operator makes good sense.

I progressed to a NUTCRACKER set and then to a LEE HAND PRESS then an RCBS single stage,then LEE TURRET,
and finally the DILLON 550B and then the Dillon 1000.1050 (FOUR OF THEM) and the motor driven AMMOLOAD (THREE OF THESE at 5000 rounds per hour)

never_retreat:
I second the notion of starting out with a single stage press.
Rcbs is built like a brick poop house and has a good warranty. Lyman makes good stuff as well. Dillion of course is the Cadillac but it's spendy for new reloader.
I have used some other people's lee presses and always thought they felt flimsy.
Get a single stage first and work on the riffle rounds first.
You need a lot of other stuff besides the press even to get started.
Dies she'll holder
Powder measure
Scale
Micrometer to check lengths
Case trimmer
I put primers in with a stand alone bench primer tool.
And I'm sure I missed a few other things.

DDJ:
Carl

No I do not find the micrometer adjustable more consistent but when the table is off, and I have never found it exactly correct, I do not need 5 minutes a screw driver and a funnel to remove the disk and replace.  Actually I only used the disk(s) for my first 2 loads and after an hour of "dialing in the correct powder weight" I ordered the adjustable one.  All it does is allow you to dial in the adjustment.  you turn a screw knob on the measure throw 2 or 3 throws and then measure the new powder drop.  For those who do not know the Auto Disk requires you to empty the powder measure, remove 2 screws form the plastic powder hopper pull out the disk rotate it to the next larger or smaller hole then reinstall it.  I did not like the thought of removing screws from the plastic hopper time and time again to rotate the disk as I changed loads.  I knew I was going to be running 3 different loads at a minimum (9mm, .45 and .223) so I decided on the upgrade very early.

The other "upgrade" I did not think of yesterday is the Auto Prime.  This saves a lot of hassle.  It does feel weak and cheep but it works better than dropping primers into the little cup one at a time.

To Never_retreat's comments on the other items that are needed. a BIG +1 not to scare you off but much of that is in a Kit and or Die set.
I would add to that a good book likely 3.  I would recommend reading ABCs of reloading before you make a purchase.

Smurf Hunter:

--- Quote from: DDJ on October 04, 2016, 10:31:14 AM ---Carl

No I do not find the micrometer adjustable more consistent but when the table is off, and I have never found it exactly correct, I do not need 5 minutes a screw driver and a funnel to remove the disk and replace.  Actually I only used the disk(s) for my first 2 loads and after an hour of "dialing in the correct powder weight" I ordered the adjustable one.  All it does is allow you to dial in the adjustment.  you turn a screw knob on the measure throw 2 or 3 throws and then measure the new powder drop.  For those who do not know the Auto Disk requires you to empty the powder measure, remove 2 screws form the plastic powder hopper pull out the disk rotate it to the next larger or smaller hole then reinstall it.  I did not like the thought of removing screws from the plastic hopper time and time again to rotate the disk as I changed loads.  I knew I was going to be running 3 different loads at a minimum (9mm, .45 and .223) so I decided on the upgrade very early.

The other "upgrade" I did not think of yesterday is the Auto Prime.  This saves a lot of hassle.  It does feel weak and cheep but it works better than dropping primers into the little cup one at a time.

To Never_retreat's comments on the other items that are needed. a BIG +1 not to scare you off but much of that is in a Kit and or Die set.
I would add to that a good book likely 3.  I would recommend reading ABCs of reloading before you make a purchase.

--- End quote ---

Many presses are neither good at priming or dropping powder.  For that reason many standalone tools have come to exist.  I'm a fan of RCBS hand primers. 
Further different styles of powder will meter differently.  Ball vs. extruded matters.  Precision rifle geeks often talk up Varget.  Great powder for a lot of things, but it's long stick like shape is a hassle in many type of powder measures.  It's fine for small batches of hunting rounds, but not worth the trouble if you are cranking out 500x .223

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

[*] Previous page

Go to full version