Armory, Self Defense, And EDC > The .22 Caliber Rifle: An Essential Homestead Firearm

22 for training with larger guns

<< < (2/3) > >>

ttubravesrock:
Update:

I took my wife with me and we bought the barebones Henry.  We put about 200 rounds through it and it seemed to work great. It shoots where you point it.  Now we just have to get better at pointing it.  We are fairly accurate to 50 yards without a scope and standing, but I'd like to push that to 150 yards without a scope and standing.

All in all, I'm pretty impressed. We bought it brand new and it is a good gun for under $300 new.

I'd like to look at some scopes and see what kind of difference it makes.

Skunkeye:
Shoot another 200 rounds through it, and it'll have paid for itself already, compared to shooting 400 rounds of .45-70 through your Marlin.

Be warned, this is the kind of math that can get you into trouble and results in having more .22s than you really need...  ;)

flippydidit:

--- Quote from: Skunkeye on January 17, 2013, 04:21:03 PM ---Be warned, this is the kind of math that can get you into trouble and results in having more .22s than you really need...  ;)

--- End quote ---

No such animal.  You can never have too much ammo!  Unless you're swimming or on fire......

ADKwarrior:

--- Quote from: flippydidit on January 17, 2013, 09:32:31 PM ---No such animal.  You can never have too much ammo!  Unless you're swimming or on fire......

--- End quote ---

Agreed!  I use upwards of 1500 rnds on a training weekend between 2 shooters regularly.

Canadian Prepper:
You'll continue to be happy with the Henry. I was really impressed with the quality of wood on mine, which was rather nice for a $250 rifle at the time.

Though some heavier target .22s can be sighted in for shooting up to 200 yards, the drop off after 100yards is so great that the gun is essentially good for targets within a few yards diffference in range. Some online articles might explain long range .22 shooting in greater detail, which is best done with subsonic ammo (the bullets are thrown somewhate as they drop from sonic to subsonic). .22 LRs are also blown around alot by the wind, but they can be great for 100 yard practice when the weather is calm, especially in the morning and evenings. The latter would be a great way to practice the shooting positions that you'll use in the woods with the heavier 45/70, at pretty close to it's maximum effective hunting/animal defence range.

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

[*] Previous page

Go to full version