Survivalism & Self Sufficiency Topics > Homesteading and Self Reliant Living

yurt platform/land pics

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surfivor:

--- Quote from: Nicodemus on December 09, 2010, 07:27:25 PM ---That looks great!

How's the inside temperature/comfort factor when you have the wood stove going?

--- End quote ---

 Without the floor insulated, it seems I can raise the temp 20-25 degrees from the outside using the small wood stove. I am missing one small insulation panel on the wall .. and did not put all of the window panels on yet ..

 When I run a small portable kerosene heater (25,000 BTU) with the wood stove, the temp inside can reach maybe 40 degrees above the outside temp .. So it was 15-20 degrees outside, I got it up to close to 60 inside. This also seems to work decent with the kerosene heater turned down low to burn fuel more slowly as even with a low flame it puts out quite a bit of heat.

surfivor:
here's wood stove pictures



I decided to be cheap and cut a live cedar tree on my property for the stove pipe. My neighbor told me after so many years the insulated pipe
may break down and at that point, it touching the cedar would not be good anymore ..

 This thing is actually very slightly cockeyed and it was coincidental that the cedar was bent slightly inward ..

 The log was set strong enough into the hole that I was able to lean a ladder onto it and climbed to the top to secure the pipe .. the top of the log I estimate must be 12 or 13 feet off the ground ..




dug a hole, had to use pick as top of ground was frozen. 2 feet down hit large rocks and could not go any farther. Stuck cedar log into the hole and put 2 cement chimney blocks on top of that .. I used the kind of chimney blocks that come in two halves otherwise having log in the middle would have been problematic. The top chimney block halves are reinforced with 2 steel bands which seemed critical to keep them together ..



Sister Wolf:
TW & I are convinced, after seeing your pics.  We'll doubtless be buying a yurt to live in on whatever property we buy, until we're able to build our own house.

Thank you so much for this thread, surfivor.

surfivor:

--- Quote from: Sister Wolf on December 10, 2010, 12:26:23 AM ---TW & I are convinced, after seeing your pics.  We'll doubtless be buying a yurt to live in on whatever property we buy, until we're able to build our own house.

Thank you so much for this thread, surfivor.

--- End quote ---

 Hey, cool ..

 Do they allow them in CA ? I guess some people just throw them up despite whatever ..

 There are some books on yurts and how to build them, a couple of decent ones I put below. There are some online resources as well.
check out www.yurtinfo.org

I studied yurt construction from
books and online sources last year, but ended up just hiring a yurt company to make the yurt. The rafters, lattice wall, and base
probably are not that hard. I found the fabric part to not really be detailed or easy for me to grasp. I guess you could buy fabric
from a yurt company as long as your yurt frame comes out to the exact right size, otherwise I guess it involves an older sewing machine
or hiring a canvas company ..

 What appealed to me is that you could take it apart and move it, sell it etc .. kind of an interesting novelty as well ..

 The roof is warrantied for 15 years, I was told the wall may last 10 years. It eventually will break down fro UV light, weather and such I guess and need to be replaced.

 I would perhaps like to build my own small yurt like 16 or 12 feet. I would say a 20 or 24 foot yurt is roomier, but a smaller one would be easier to transport. Mine is 20 feet (300 sq feet). the upper bounds seems to be 30 feet which is 700 square feet ..

 I could see living in New Mexico, Baja, Alaska or someplace in a yurt for several months .. ever been to baja ? Good surfing and less crowded than CA.







this seems to be a popular book, but is not so much about building your own yurt though does have some plans for a platform and alot of other info.

Sister Wolf:

--- Quote from: surfivor on December 10, 2010, 07:40:12 AM --- Do they allow them in CA ? I guess some people just throw them up despite whatever ..

--- End quote ---

We'll be living in another state when we purchase/build one.


--- Quote --- There are some books on yurts and how to build them, a couple of decent ones I put below. There are some online resources as well.
check out www.yurtinfo.org

I studied yurt construction from
books and online sources last year, but ended up just hiring a yurt company to make the yurt. The rafters, lattice wall, and base
probably are not that hard. I found the fabric part to not really be detailed or easy for me to grasp. I guess you could buy fabric
from a yurt company as long as your yurt frame comes out to the exact right size, otherwise I guess it involves an older sewing machine
or hiring a canvas company ..

--- End quote ---

I think we'd be buying a kit from a yurt company.  :)  I wouldn't want to build my own before we started building the house.  That would be discouraging and hard to do from here.  Something fairly simple (as with yours) would be a much better deal.  I'd rather spend two weeks camping on our property while we created the yurt from a kit, than several months researching and building the perfect yurt while we try to survive off the land.  We'll be doing enough of that "surviving" nonsense while we build the house, y'know?  And I think I'd be putting it at least partway underneath a metal awning of some kind (to help protect it from snow buildup, or water damage from the rain).


--- Quote --- The roof is warrantied for 15 years, I was told the wall may last 10 years. It eventually will break down fro UV light, weather and such I guess and need to be replaced.

 I would perhaps like to build my own small yurt like 16 or 12 feet. I would say a 20 or 24 foot yurt is roomier, but a smaller one would be easier to transport. Mine is 20 feet (300 sq feet). the upper bounds seems to be 30 feet which is 700 square feet ..

--- End quote ---

700 sf!!! That's HUGE for a yurt!  LOVE this idea!  :)  Not sure what you'd need as far as insulation, or a nice big wood-stove goes in order to heat a yurt that big in the winter, but I bet it could be done without too much extra work.


--- Quote --- I could see living in New Mexico, Baja, Alaska or someplace in a yurt for several months .. ever been to baja ? Good surfing and less crowded than CA.

--- End quote ---

I have been to Baja!  It's beautiful, but it's just a little scary right now politically.  I'm not sure I'd chance living down there right now.  But I'd love to see pics and hear stories if you do it!

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