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New to rabbits

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Lockdown:
I am new to rabbits and have recently put in a buck and two does. they willl be bred next month when the does are old enough and right now i am just getting used to taking care of them. I have them in my garage in seperate cages, hung from the wall with a piece of corrugated plastic hung under the cages to catch the droppings and let them fall in to a collection bucket. I free feed hay and was wondering what to do with all the hay they kick out of the cages. Is it possible to just scoop up the kicked out hay, shake out the droppings and put it back in the cage. I know that sounds strange, with the urine on the hay and all, but they are kicking out a huge amount and I was going to use the hay for their bedding also. I need to find a way to not waste so much. Thanks

Lockdown

Cedar:
That us why I don't feed hay except for special occasions like Christmas and Easter. If you have good quality 18% feed, you don't need it.

Cedar

Lockdown:

--- Quote from: Cedar on October 28, 2014, 12:56:27 AM ---That us why I don't feed hay except for special occasions like Christmas and Easter. If you have good quality 18% feed, you don't need it.

Cedar

--- End quote ---
what do you use for bedding on the cage floor and do you put it back in if they kick it out?

Cedar:
Mine are in self cleaning wire cages. That said, I still have to clean them every 3-4 months, as with our higher humidity, hair sticks to the wire when they shed out and then poo starts to accumulate (I never had this problem since 1977, just here now that I really live in Rain Forest). No, they do not get sore hocks from the wire.



When the does are having a litter, they get nestboxes stuffed with oat straw.

The smaller buck cages are on 'this side' of the photo, the first three to the right. The remainder are the larger doe cages. The one sitting on the ground, we were putting the hooks on the pipe to hang them. They are easy to take down for pressure washing. It takes about 30 seconds to remove the cage.

In this photo, this is after the automatic watering system was being installed. I am not sure it is on the other side yet. It was the day we were working on the new system, but it doesn't look like the other side is set up yet. It was soon after the photo anyway.



Cedar

Lockdown:

--- Quote from: Cedar on October 28, 2014, 10:16:58 AM ---Mine are in self cleaning wire cages. That said, I still have to clean them every 3-4 months, as with our higher humidity, hair sticks to the wire when they shed out and then poo starts to accumulate (I never had this problem since 1977, just here now that I really live in Rain Forest). No, they do not get sore hocks from the wire.



When the does are having a litter, they get nestboxes stuffed with oat straw.

The smaller buck cages are on 'this side' of the photo, the first three to the right. The remainder are the larger doe cages. The one sitting on the ground, we were putting the hooks on the pipe to hang them. They are easy to take down for pressure washing. It takes about 30 seconds to remove the cage.

In this photo, this is after the automatic watering system was being installed. I am not sure it is on the other side yet. It was the day we were working on the new system, but it doesn't look like the other side is set up yet. It was soon after the photo anyway.



Cedar

--- End quote ---
Nice setup. I guess I didn't ask my question right. I'm mostly wondering if I put hay in for bedding during cold weather and they eat some, burrow or play with some, and kick the rest out, would it be OK to scoop that hay up and put it back in to replenish the bedding to save on hay. Will they eat the hay even though they have urinated and pooped on it. If not, then I can recycle the hay. If they eat what I put back in, is that going to cause a health issue. Thanks

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