Armory, Self Defense, And EDC > General Firearm Discussion

The Window is about to CLOSE. Get your guns and ammo NOW.

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iam4liberty:

--- Quote from: mountainmoma on September 29, 2018, 11:30:38 AM ---Ok, maybe I should buy a modern sprting rifle, htey are light weight, adjustable, etc.... but maybe expensive ? Are there still components to put together ?  ANd, even if I do or dont buy a new one, I have some practice ammo, but what would be a good actual round for the mini-14, not just for practice ? And, how many rounds should one have...... My house is only so big.....

--- End quote ---

It depends on the age of the mini-14.  The twist rate changed from 1 in 10" (1975 to early 1989) to 1 in 7" (1989 to mid 1994) to 1 in 9" (1994 to present).  Assuming 1 in 9" for general purposes you will most likely want a round with a 55 grain bullet in a reloadable brass case. In NATO military ammo the M193 cartridge from a quality manufacturer is a good choice.  The PMC Bronze 223 Remington in 55 grain is also a good budget friendly choice.  It will also shoot the variety of game specific 223 rounds like the Remington Hog Hammer.  But that type of specialty round should be viewd as auxilary to general purpose.

Regarding quantity, if it fits your budget, for general purposes purchase full cases which are 1000 rounds or so depending on packaging.  If you plan on storing, rounds that come in battle packs are nice and convenient.





LvsChant:
BulkAmmo.com has been a good choice for us in the past... Thanks for posting this reminder... I think we may need to stock up a bit more.

22LR is only $199/5000 rds, so about the same as David mentioned a few years back...

bcksknr:
    Other than for trade or barter, I don't see the need for thousands of rounds of ammunition. Self-defense is another matter. Are you really going to go through a thousand rounds of ammo to hold off the intruder at the door? Not that carefully chosen firearms of different capabilities and a reasonable amount of ammunition for each doesn't make sense for the prepared individual. Of course it does. While an important part of any preparation planning, the cost of many firearms and huge amounts of ammunition should be behind many other preparations on the list.
     Are you in debt; credit card or mortgage? Do you have outstanding loans? Do you have a well maintained home and vehicle? Have you an adequate supply of food, medicine, household supplies? Do you have clothing and "outdoor" gear suitable for your climate. Do you have realistic emergency bags, with essential shelter, fire, water, first aid, foods and "camping" items for yourself and everyone else in your family; in case you have to leave your home? Have you made a portable folder with all of your important documents and contact lists? If you have children, have you explained to them what to do during possible emergencies. Have you really gained and shared enough knowledge to survive?
     We all know the drill. There is a place for firearms and ammunition in all of this, but I don't think its at the top of the list. Don't forget about training to use those firearms in a safe and effective manner, for every member of the family. If you think all you need to survive a breakdown of society is a gun, because you are going to shoot someone more prepared and take what they have, remember, they will shoot back. I understand that firearms will be essential for self defense and perhaps food gathering, but I wouldn't "short change" other essential supplies. Of course, if you have no firearms or ammunition and you really believe that they will be denied to you in the near future, then now might be a prudent time to reasonably buy a gun and the supplies to "keep it going". All things in moderation. [size=78%]   [/size]
 

     

Alan Georges:

--- Quote from: bcksknr on September 29, 2018, 03:50:48 PM ---    Other than for trade or barter, I don't see the need for thousands of rounds of ammunition. Self-defense is another matter. Are you really going to go through a thousand rounds of ammo to hold off the intruder at the door?

--- End quote ---
The real reason for having thousands of rounds on hand is for training.  Running through 500 rounds in a day's class isn't unusual.  It's way better to buy it while it's cheap and available, now, than to dawdle and get caught short in an expensive ammo drought.

The Professor:

--- Quote from: Alan Georges on September 29, 2018, 04:23:58 PM ---The real reason for having thousands of rounds on hand is for training.  Running through 500 rounds in a day's class isn't unusual.  It's way better to buy it while it's cheap and available, now, than to dawdle and get caught short in an expensive ammo drought.

--- End quote ---

This. . . .and other reasons.

I know it is  no longer de rigueur to talk of TEOTWAWKI scenarioes or MAJOR interruptions.  But there still lies the (however remote) possibility of a truly long-term disaster striking. 

Ammunition is not necessarily just for mowing down your errant neighbors or the spikey-haired mutant zombies cresting the hill behind your retreat.

There are many situations that may make it wise to purchase ammo and weapons while the prices are still low.  Consider a major shift in politics.  We know that liberals desperately want to enact a much more definitive "assault weapons" ban.  Consider what happened the last time (1994) this happened.  Before, I could buy Colt (top quality) AR's for $560 for an HBAR.  The day after Clinton signed the bill?  Yeah, you couldn't even touch one for $3,000.

When Obama got elected, especially the second time. . . guns, magazines and ammo skyrocketed in price.  Certain calibers of ammunition were impossible to find.  Sure, you could order them. . .and you'd have to wait a year to get that order in.  In fact, everything was so difficult to find that many dealers (and suppliers) went out of business for lack of product to sell.  Sure, many fly-by-night companies popped up and everyone with a CAM started turning out AR lowers, for example.  You paid dearly for even them.

It's usually at this point someone politely coughs and mumble "I reload" under their breath.  Yeah, so do I.  A quick review of the articles posted here on TSP Forum will remind you that primers, powder, virgin brass and bullets. . .especially by easily recognized manufacturers were all as easy to find as hen's teeth.

That was the year that my wife and I stopped our competitive shooting in IPSC, 3-gun and IDPA matches all together.  We shot at least two matches a month and needed a MINIMUM of 100 rounds for most of the matches.  Math tells us we needed at least 400 rounds a month when ammo was almosts impossible to find.  Plus, the political environment experienced at the time had us concerned that a lame-duck liberal president might choose to advance an anti-gun agenda.    If I couldn't buy it and I couldn't reload it. . .every round fired downrange was a round I wouldn't have.

I get it, I really do.  It has become gauche to talk about guns and survival.  Anymore, if you mention Bug-Out Bags, Retreats or Firearms, all the Cool Survival Kids look at you like a Frenchman who just heard you pronounce the silent "t" in escargot.

And may all that is Holy protect you if you mention camouflage or say something against the "gray man" (mis?)conception. . .but, I'm just pointing out a situation and opportunity on which the window is closing. . .I'm neither standing there pushing you out, nor am I deriding anyone who doesn't.

We are simply approaching a confluence of potential situations, each of which may lead to higher prices and unavailability of certain products.  Now, I'll  hush up, put on my most excellent set of BDU's, get my Pit Yorkie and go patrol the compound on my quad-runner.

The Professor

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