Author Topic: Fermented beer in a keg  (Read 2676 times)

Offline Packerfan78

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Fermented beer in a keg
« on: January 04, 2018, 09:43:09 PM »
Hey guys, i apologize if somebody already asked this but i was thinking of storing a couple kegs of beer in case there was a 2 week black out. I live in phoenix arizona and figure i could power my kegerator with a generator. Even if we dont have a long term blackout its always nice to have a spare keg. So, does anybody know if any keg beer is fermented so it could be stored in a non refrigerated environment?

Offline CharlesH

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Re: Fermented beer in a keg
« Reply #1 on: January 05, 2018, 05:44:21 AM »
Are they coming to you under pressure?  If so I’d think you’d be OK, but I’d do an internet search and see what the experts say.  I think it’s considered best to keep them in cold storage (50-ish degrees F) but I know homebrewers who don’t have the ability to do that.  I assume you’d be cycling through them?

Offline fritz_monroe

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Re: Fermented beer in a keg
« Reply #2 on: January 05, 2018, 07:13:38 AM »
Beer isn't typically fermented in the keg.  It's in a huge vat and the keg is filled.  Even homebrewed beer is not fermented in the keg.  You ferment the beer, put it in the keg and pressurize it.

If you decide to keep a couple of kegs, you need to rotate them.  Beer does go bad.  It's not a "it's going to kill you" bad, but it will taste nasty and off. 

Offline David in MN

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Re: Fermented beer in a keg
« Reply #3 on: January 05, 2018, 07:50:40 AM »
Beer isn't typically fermented in the keg.  It's in a huge vat and the keg is filled.  Even homebrewed beer is not fermented in the keg.  You ferment the beer, put it in the keg and pressurize it.

It is done but rare. You produce the wort, pitch in the keg, and seal when it hits the correct gravity to carbonate. Usually done with brews meant to be yeasty and usually low alcohol (poor storage). The Campaign for Real Ale advocates a primary ferment and then secondary ferment in the keg for a similar effect. But again, it's for quality and historical accuracy, not shelf life.

http://www.camra.org.uk/home

Kegs aren't meant for storage. Kegs are meant to be an efficient way to dispense beer at bars where hundreds of bottles every hour would be a waste. The shelf life of kegs is poor, very poor if you don't have a CO2 system.

Beer is preserved two ways: hops and alcohol. The more of each the longer the shelf life. If you want to store beer, I would recommend buying a few cases of Sierra Nevada Winter Ale. Worst case you sore them and drink when you replace next year (this beer is actually better with a year's age).

Other beers I would (and have) aged:

Sierra Nevada Torpedo
Sierra Neevada Bigfoot
Summit Winter
Stone (almost any 7% or above IPA from Stone will work)
Burton Bridge Empire Pale Ale (improves much with age)
JW Lee's Harvest Ale (best beer I have found for aging)
Anchor Old Foghorn
Thomas Hardy's Ale
Hair of the Dog Adam's Beer

The pattern here is IPAs and barleywines. Other good agers are Russian Imperial Stouts, Trappists, soured beers, and (in general) the high gravity Belgian ales.

Offline Packerfan78

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Re: Fermented beer in a keg
« Reply #4 on: January 05, 2018, 10:05:49 AM »
Thanks guys. I misused my jargon. I meant pasteurized beer in a keg. Sorry for the confusion.

Offline Smurf Hunter

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Re: Fermented beer in a keg
« Reply #5 on: January 05, 2018, 10:42:52 AM »
David is correct.

If I wanted to store beer for a up a year, I'd bottle instead of keg. I do have 3 korny kegs and CO2, but I don't brew as often as I used to.

if anyone needs hops that start with the letter "C" (citra, centennial, cascade, columbus) I have about 10# dried in my freezer.  Some are 2 seasons old (home grown), and I'm unsure of the alpha acid levels, but no harm for aroma hops if you are experimenting with IPAs and similar.