Survivalism & Self Sufficiency Topics > Homesteading and Self Reliant Living

Land Prices ..

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Stein:
I fully agree that permanent camping isn't my idea of fun.  If the only plan I had for the land was camping, I wouldn't be able to justify the cost.

I live in the Pacific NW and grew up in Montana.

I would like to pick up some land, but would plan on developing it into our future home paying cash as we went.  For me, 1 acre would be the most I would need.

We are pretty rural and don't see the need to move from here except for some massive volcano eruption or a biblical disaster of some sort.  We are the bug-in type I guess.

surfivor:

 I like camping, I date this girl, she often lets me sleep on her couch so I don't have to drive home. I often sleep on her screen porch because I like the fresh air, in the winter I bring my winter sleeping bag over there so I can sleep on the porch.

  If I bought a house in the suburbs, I'd make sure it had a nice porch as they might not allow me to camp in the backyard all the time.

  I don't own any land, I just have a small condo that is 470 square feet, but my truck camper is like my second home. The condo is near my mothers house, and mostly I need to be near the city for IT type work.

  If I bought some land and the dollar collapsed, maybe the land would still be worth something. I have enough money invested in other places that a piece of land might be a place to put some money, and it it's 10k or under 20k, it's not so bad.

 A financial adviser called me once and tried to tell me he wanted to meet to talk to me about my retirement plan, I told him I might be living out of a tent camper and fishing for salmon, something like that is sort of the best idea I have so far.

DarkEyes:
I know someone who lives in Maine and the winters in northern Maine are treacherous.  They also have short growing seasons.  If you are going to invest in land, try to find something that you could make improvements to the permaculture, plant fruit trees, nut trees, leave a spot open for a garden, because I'm betting in 10 years you may feel differently about camping and cold weather.

DeltaEchoVictor:
Owning land is never a bad thing.  Land will always be worth something. 

No one is making more land after all, so as the population increases & more & more people look to get away from the hustle & bustle, land prices will increase.

surfivor:

--- Quote from: DarkEyes on October 18, 2008, 09:30:41 PM ---I know someone who lives in Maine and the winters in northern Maine are treacherous.  They also have short growing seasons.  If you are going to invest in land, try to find something that you could make improvements to the permaculture, plant fruit trees, nut trees, leave a spot open for a garden, because I'm betting in 10 years you may feel differently about camping and cold weather.

--- End quote ---

 I would not choose to spend winters in Maine if I had the choice, but survivalism seems to be about preparing for limited choices to some extent or finding a way to live which is less comfortable in some sense though doable. I could be comfortable with Maine most of the other seasons, or with a wood stove probably 9 or 10 months out of the year at least. I like vacationing in Maine, I think northern Maine might actually be more quiet than I would prefer even. I would have to go to some churches and all, but still I don't always like being by myself in the middle of nowhere for long periods, though if I had to do that, then that's what I'd have to do. I do like Maine for vacationing and such.

 There is a story about a man who lived to be 86 years old with no heat in a small cabin in Canada, watch a couple of videos on that:


http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-6993127768428359932

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ftapLFtzGpw


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