Survivalism & Self Sufficiency Topics > Home And Business Security

Where do we start?

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Twibble:
There's so much to do on our house security-wise, it's a bit overwhelming.  We don't have much money to spend at all.  The info is based on what I know sitting at the kitchen table, not what my husband might know (he might know what type of door the front door is).

We have 4 security cameras, but they're not connected to anything.  The connections do come into the house.  The previous owners had them hooked up to switch and a TV, so they could hit the switch and see a different camera.

The door coming in from the garage is an interior door, not an exterior one.  It just has a door knob lock, but it can easily be pried open (this is currently how we get in when we lock ourselves out).

Our back doors are what I think is called French doors - 2 doors mounted with the door knobs together where you can open one or both.  Each door has 6 small window panes in it.  There are no other windows near it.

Our front door is an exterior door with a peephole, no windows, and a dead bolt.  There are no windows near it.

Our house is a one-story house. 

There are 2 windows that look over a locked walkway on one side of the house. 

There are two windows that open into the game room, which is an addition to the house (it has lots of windows, no way to truly secure it, but it's in the back yard).  There is no actual entrance from it into the house.

Our front windows look over a flowerbed in which everything has died.  We live in a desert, so I might just plant cacti.  Our bathroom has a smaller window, still big enough for someone to crawl through if we leave it open, up front.

Part of our back fence is a garage door and a shed.  There is a gate from the front into the backyard, but it has to stay unlocked because we have friends living in the shed right now.

The other part of the back fence is a large piece of wavy metal that rolls open.  It's currently held closed by a bolt that slides against if from the side of the shed.

If this was your house, where would you start?

Twibble:
We think the front door is steel.  The magnet to cover the peephole sticks all over it.

Roundabouts:
This is something we need to do too.  I am sure others will have better advice.  But off the top of my head trying to remember what I have heard on the pod cast and read here …  Long screws into the door jam.  I am not sure if people were replacing the short screws on the hinge & putting very long screws in or adding them else where I think I would take out the short screws from the hinge and exchange for long ones that will reach the door framing.  That is one thing that is cheap and easy. 

Getting good locks which can be $$ There was a post on here with info for rating door locks and dead bolts.  I think I would look at the entry points that are most hidden that have the easiest access.   The front door would be good.  If you can find research which point of entry someone would most likely break into.   

Lighting is a good thing I like the idea of cacti under the windows.  Also having pepper spray or bat or or something by each door.  In front of all my windows that are easy to climb into I like to keep things that can easily be knocked over and would make noise if they hit the floor. 

securing your garage door seems to me to be very important.  Because if someone could get in there they can close the garage door and have complete cover to do what they want.  Then securing the garage door to the house. 

Maybe there is something that you can block an exterior door with like a chair or something when you go to bed at night.  Easy to move if you had to get our for a fire. 

There is film that can go on glass that keeps someone from breaking the glass.  That can be $$ from what I recall.  So just working one door one window at a time.  Doing what needs to be done and then go to the next one.  might work for you. 

Closing curtains and blinds when not at home and at night is a good thing.  I think I heard that somewhere. 

If your car has an alarm on it by keeping your keys handy if you can push the buttons to set the alarm off that would draw attention or at least make noise enough to scare someone off.  I think that was on this forum too.  I thought that was a pretty cleaver thing. 

Great question.  Can't wait to hear what others with more knowledge on this subject have to say.   I really like the idea of prevention over just get a gun as first & only advice. 

Do you have a neighbor hood watch program if not maybe you could start one.  Calling the local police department & or fire department might be a good source of info.  Maybe they would send someone out to inspect your house giving you ideas of where to start and what to do.  I know in our area we can have someone come out.   Also you might call your home owners insurance agent and ask them if they have any information or incentive programs or discounts on locks?   I have not heard of any thing like that but you never know. 

Some of our entry points I have thought about a chain and padlock.  Ugly but cheaper and would most defiantly slow someone down.

Another thing that I think often gets over looked is the mental part of what would you do if…..  Practicing escape routs  meet up areas and such.  What would you do if you came home and a door was kicked in?  What do you do if you see smoke?  Remember fire prevention and safety in general is also part of security.      That reminds me a smoke detector down low that you could easily set off for intruder by using a match or cigarette or something that makes smoke easily.  Heard that somewhere too. 

 

oktheniknow:
I can relate. Just closed on a house and getting new deadbolts. Went by a lock place to get some Grade 1 deadbolts and was shocked that the lady there said it was overkill and said they'd just bust in a window and not bump a lock. The locks she was suggesting there were Grade 2 or above and the locks didn't look as long as others I've seen online.
I wouldn't underestimate a thief. Saw a Grade 1 at Ace Hardware. May just get them there or online if I can find the ones with the longer locks and bolster with longer screws and metal plates along the door frame, plus motion detectors and PVC in the windows. 

creuzerm:
Finding a way to hook up those cameras may be a cheap step. An old computer running zoneminder and a video capture card (try ebay for a used one) would be an inexpensive way to go. You've got the expensive bits done at this point. There is another thread that discusses this. At least you can catch them and get them secured behind better locks than you or I can afford (wait, we bought them locks already!)

A monitored security sign by the front door would be a nice touch. Even if the house ins't monitored by them. You've already got the cameras to reinforce the idea that you have a good system installed. A few cheap window alarms installed so they are evident to those looking for them will help as well.

Most garage car doors are trivial to open from the outside. Once inside, close the door, take your time to work open the door to the house. I'd prioritize that garage/house door. A used metal commercial/industrial door well installed will really slow down somebody try to gain entry. I've seen one beat to hell with a basketball sized rock that didn't give.

There is no reason why another deadbolt can't be installed down by your ankles.

A dog sign zip tied to the gate to the back yard gate is also a good sign to have.

Some of these ideas are pretty cheap, some cost a bit more.

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