Author Topic: mountainmoma's 2014 garden  (Read 36682 times)

Offline Cedar

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Re: mountainmoma's 2014 garden
« Reply #60 on: June 25, 2014, 10:09:24 PM »
Bummer about the poppies.  I'm on my fourth attempt to get some going in my garden with each attempt being 700+ seeds of no less than five different varieties.

I planted out 1/3 of a gallon of poppy seed this year, and it came up. Then the sheep ate them.  :-\

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Offline mountainmoma

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Re: mountainmoma's 2014 garden
« Reply #61 on: June 25, 2014, 11:06:36 PM »
yeah, it never goes as planned. Just have to move on to the next thing......


Here is the box of potatoes I harvested from the russet potato bed today. Estimating it with my holding it on the bathroom scale has it at 37 pounds, then about 3 pounds from last week makes it maybe 40 pounds from the 48sq ft bed. Some plants had nothing much, and  a few had a ton and large. I did not seperate out. Next year maybe I will do so and then I would be selecting ones that do well in my location -- actually, if I just cut and plant out the large ones -- should be the same idea.


Dinner from the land here. Homemade Calzones: Saute of the bulb part of a large immature bulbing onion and a lot of lambsquarters and some of my friends homemade garlic powder, then add 3 types of homemade goat cheeses (which is why I made this, the cheese needed to be eaten....) Ricotta made from the whey when I made Halloumi cheese last week, mozzarella I made last week and forgot to grate and freeze ( I did grate and freeze the half not used in this recipe) and a bit of manchego. The dough was half fresh ground whole wheat and half white flour. But, my duaghter was not impressed.... she is eating the cheesecake

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Re: mountainmoma's 2014 garden
« Reply #62 on: June 26, 2014, 11:27:14 AM »
Wow, great harvest on the potatoes.  I need to get in and mulch mine more, soon. 

Garden looks great, MM.  Any chance you could post a pic of a young lambsquarters?  I planted all the seed you sent me, but don't know what I should be avoiding weeding.

Offline mountainmoma

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Re: mountainmoma's 2014 garden
« Reply #63 on: June 26, 2014, 02:43:45 PM »
That is one of the two potato beds, and while not a good harvest since it got too hot for them to mature, it is still an acceptable harvest for the trouble. I have learned from last year that leaving them longer will not make it better. WHen they're done, they're done.



You are in luck I found a few magenta spreen lambsquarters new plants, it is dry, dry here and past when they spontaneously sprout. Even when small, they will soon show the magenta in the center like these.



And, a bit bigger.



Onion bed that I have been pulling almost done onions from. My garden gets impossibley crowded as I let the paths totally fill with other edible plants. That is mature magenta spreen lambsquarters in the paths that you see, about 6ft tall. I go out and break off the tops, then bring in and strip the leaves off to make dinner, like last nights calzones.

At least some of the onions are developing the onion disease I have had here before. I didnt grow for a few years, and this is a fresh location. But, the roots go away, there is white at the base, and they get soft -- it's my weather, erratic watering, overcrowding, or it just came in with an onion order 5 years ago and it will take a lot longer of no onions to get it out of the garden !



Today we finally went under the deck and dug out the tomato cages. This bed is the paste tomatoes, also showing yet more pathways full of food. My daughter knocked over alot while we worked so she could actually access the heirloom tomato bed, so the chickens and goats got a treat. I just let it go until it is in my way like that. Both the chickens and goats like weeds and lambsquarters. There are little tomatoes on some plants, Rocepco Paste and Crimson sprinter are first with them, as usual here. But, the others are starting to bloom too.



She accidentally knocked off a few branches off the garbanzo beans too, my paths are minimized, so every other path is 1 ft or so wide and then the other is wheelbarrow width, 2 ft and a bit. So, it is not easy to work in the 1ft wide spaces that are full of lambsquarters. ANyway, so we disected a few developing garbanzos. The bean pods are like ballons, air filled and cushioning. When opened, they show one or two beans per pod, still very small and already scrunchy looking.

Offline mountainmoma

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Re: mountainmoma's 2014 garden
« Reply #64 on: June 26, 2014, 06:19:44 PM »
You might want to scroll down this page to see shots of freshly sprouting thickly planted lambsquarters. There is a certain leaf shape with serrations that you should notice, even if it is too early to show the magenta center dusting

http://leslieland.com/2010/05/lambsquarter-lambs-quarter-chenopodium-delicious-whatever-you-call-it/

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Re: mountainmoma's 2014 garden
« Reply #65 on: June 26, 2014, 08:34:47 PM »
What do the lambs quarters taste like?   Is it something you cook with, or eat in a fresh salad?

Offline mountainmoma

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Re: mountainmoma's 2014 garden
« Reply #66 on: June 26, 2014, 10:20:55 PM »
I guess you could read the last link for someone elses impressions of the taste -- to me, it is just a cooking green, but I also eat some of the young leaves raw, especially when I am out in the garden. SOmething between spinach and kale ?

Offline mountainmoma

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Re: mountainmoma's 2014 garden
« Reply #67 on: June 27, 2014, 07:50:59 PM »
Ok, just dug up the garlic bed. I looked back at my first post here and see that I said I planted 132 cloves of garlic, and this was in a space 4 ft by a little more than 4 ft. This is some amazingly large and beautiful garlic, for the most part. Some of it has some fungal stuff starting on the outside of it as I have been overhead watering the entire garden as I have been busy, and that means I have been watering garlic that was done and should have been harvested a week or two ago. Dont do that. Keep an eye on your garlic. Or, it might have done this anyways as I seem to get fungal issues on my aliums. But, I still have TONS of garlic, especially as we are now a household of 2 people. ANd, the ones that showed some fungal issues I put in a separate pile. I will go thru these and pull off good cloves from most of them and dry them now for garlic powder.

The realy good ones, I will save for seed.

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Re: mountainmoma's 2014 garden
« Reply #68 on: July 03, 2014, 07:45:20 AM »
Cool, I definitely have some Magenta Lambsquarters that have started coming up! 

I'm also finally seeing the first of the lovage I planted last fall coming up.  Talk about your slow starters!  I tilled one of the beds I'd planted with it along the edge and now it's popping up everywhere. ::)  I wanted some shade for my more fragile stuff.  Ah well, I'll get rid of what I don't want.  My perennial that's been producing my seeds for me the last two years is fully flowered and about to start forming seeds already (it was the first thing to green up in my garden this year).

Offline mountainmoma

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Re: mountainmoma's 2014 garden
« Reply #69 on: August 09, 2014, 11:55:43 PM »
sorry I got so busy last month. I had done a post, but the computer glitched after a long post with pictures, and I didnt have time to redo.

Ok. last month, harvested the other potato bed, which was mostly red potatoes, about 30 pounds, poor yield, but very tasty. Actually, the reds did well, just that the blues and yellows didnt yield much at all.

All onions harvested, left too long, put about 1/2 onto the compost, but the others are real nice, about 50 large storage onions.

Pink short season popcorn planted, birds pulled most out, replanted, heat, and filled in more seeds yet again. So, about 3 beds, 150 plants at most. Went in were the potatoes came out, and one bed over by the butternut squash. There are a couple pumpkin plants in the corners of the corn beds, hope they do well, 2 cinderella and one giant. We would like a couple halloween pumpkins. 2 are growing great.

Garbanzo bean plants pulled and drying. These got nice and big and tons of pods.

Bed where the onions came out was replanted with russet potatoes that sprouted in the garage storage box. These are doing real well. I had intended to put the rest in where the garbanzo beans and garlic came out, but didnt get to it --so, dont know if it can happen.

Tomatoes are huge plants, first tomato was last week and was a rocepco paste, like last year. Today I noticed quite a few ready, more paste and a couple crimson sprinters.

Gophers ate 3 new trees I had planted, fig by the front door and 2 honey locusts.

the 2 pear trees have fire blight damage, maybe drought stress.

All cucumbers died, what I get for traveling.

Bean bed is going gangbusters, as is the butternut squash.

We had a few salads from the new zealand spinach, which I had never grown before. There is more, it does well here.

Peppers are pathetic.

So many strawberries from the Seascape everbearing, my girl was bringing a basket of strawberries a day to ballet intesive for fruit for her lunch. Todays are so many, I need to make jam or freeze some.

Grapes harvest is huge, and I havent been feeling too well, so I have large bowls of picked grapes just sitting all over the front room. There is a bit left, but the birds are working on those

Offline mountainmoma

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Re: mountainmoma's 2014 garden
« Reply #70 on: August 10, 2014, 12:08:55 AM »


Paw Paw tree


Hazel nut on the tree, this was a poor year for them, maybe from weather. But, for some reason, not as many squirells. This shot was last month. The other day, I picked a handful of ripe, and that's all there was



This is a new tree I set out this spring, apple I grafted last year, still alive and doing well. That is my large Hudon Golden Gem apple tree behind it



Hudson Golden Gem apples are an unusual elongated shape. This was taken last month.




The Glenora Grapes are on a trellis shading the deck, there is now enough that even though I was gone and not well and I didnt net them this year, the birds and possums and racoons couldnt eat them all. These are tasty grapes, but there are only 2 of us. We have given quite a bit away. And, I hope to get some out to dry. The weather has been funny, I had been out of it, and grapes take forever to dry.


because of our odd weather, I could not just leave the onions out under a tree to dry, as I normally could, so my house smells like onions, this is a shelf that is here temporarily, as this is next to the front door.
« Last Edit: August 10, 2014, 12:14:17 AM by mountainmoma »

Offline mountainmoma

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Re: mountainmoma's 2014 garden
« Reply #71 on: August 16, 2014, 01:17:22 AM »

Young chickens born here growing fast, about 5 or 6 weeks old. Momma is the hen in the upper right, golden laced wyandotte, and she has these 4 left. One of the golden ones was rescued by us one night last month as a rat had pulled her out from the nest, dropped her as we ran out. One of the dark ones we had to take out and give extra care for 4 days, ill, and is now doing great.



We are picking a ton of strawberries every day, this is one of two beds, we had a lull after the intial flush, I wasnt good enough on clipping off the runners, but once they were clipped off and I got regular with the watering, we are back. We only eat them the day they are picked. Any left go in the fridge to save for jam or freeze for smoothies. Tonight I made some jam



This bed was the onion bed, the storage onions drying in last posts pictures. It is replanted to potatoes, they went in about 3 weeks ago and nights are cool so doing good.


Now, the 2 beds of potatoes I harvested end of June I planted to a short season corn, this doesnt show the corn, what it does show is Racoon footprints and damage. Young corn has to be protected from racoons and birds. They pull it up when it first sprouts because they want to eat the seed, the corn kernel. This remay was protecting a reseeding to fill out where They ate some when I was away a few weeks ago. And, they pulled it back and ate a few on the edge again. But, we will get some popcorn. This bed is the lightest, but it has 2 pumpkin plants in the corners which will fill it in.



This is one of the other corn beds. This is the first year I have grown corn in raised beds, usually I just make one large corn field in an area between the trees, but consolidation from the drought, less watering area. Bed to the right is the Butternut squash which is doing great and forming little nascent squashes. To the left is a mostly failure bed, I was away in the heat and all the cucumbers died, and for some reason the peppers are not doing well, night too cold maybe, and some died in the earlier heat. One summer squash is doing well there. So, I plan to put in winter vegetables there. Just have to keep moving on.


We have been getting some tomatoes, especially the rocepco paste tomatoes. This is the paste tomato bed. I use tomato cages, 10 paste tomato plants -- rocepco and amish paste with 2 cherry tomatoes at the other end in this bed.



First year I have grown this, plants given to me by a neighbor. This is the new zealand spinach, which isnt realy spinach. I remembered to pick some for a salad with some cut up tomatoes for todays lunch.


And last, this is the bean bed. What a difference a month makes ! These are seeds saved from last years grow out here of Carol Deepes beefy grex beans ( an interspecies cross of Black miltpa and goucho). I selected for bean size and color, not for growing habit, so there is a mix of growing habits here, bush/ climbing and inbetween. I have been eating a first few green beans when I am out watering.






Offline mountainmoma

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Re: mountainmoma's 2014 garden
« Reply #72 on: August 22, 2014, 12:22:35 AM »

I am getting to the ed of harvesting grapes, and I have some left out to eat and give away, and a bag of this much or more in the fridge


I usually just take the dehydrator drying racks and put them out in the sun like this with the grapes


Covered with a shear curtain to keep the birds from eating them. Grapes take a long time to dry. I bring them in at night so the racoons and opossums dont eat them, take them out the next day.


But, we got a misty, sprinkling, almost raining day yesterday, so I left them in the dehydrator rack and plugged it in in the afternoon so they wouldnt mold, and it gives the house a bit of heat too. This is my dehydrator/ It is homemade, from the Living Foods dehydrator plans.




I left them in it over night then today too, they are moving along towards raisons. I'll turn it off and set them back in the sun tomorrow


Offline mountainmoma

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Re: mountainmoma's 2014 garden
« Reply #73 on: August 22, 2014, 12:38:50 AM »



Todays strawberry harvest, I didnt get out to pick yesterday. I put these aside for my daughter to take to her friends birthday party tomorrow, along with an orange chiffon cake and some whipped cream. My county grows most of the Nations berries I believe and while not grown commercially on the mountain as my season isnt as long as the coast, every kind of berry grows well up here. These are Seascape everbearing strawberries, a variety planted alot in this county



This all is just one garbanzo bean plant. They grew quite big, bigger than I had thought they would get, as I had never grown them before/



The rest of the harvest is here, I have forgotten about it since harvesting, I will need to unbundle and check that they are all drying well. I wonder how much garbanzo beans are in there, a couple pounds anyways



2 of the 3 new kids, about 2 1/2 weeks old



And this is all of the goats (less the buck who is on the other side of the fence to the right)

Offline zarfbloot

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Re: mountainmoma's 2014 garden
« Reply #74 on: August 23, 2014, 06:16:57 AM »
Aww man I love baby goats!! They are so fun to watch.

Offline mountainmoma

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Re: mountainmoma's 2014 garden
« Reply #75 on: August 23, 2014, 11:48:58 AM »
Aww man I love baby goats!! They are so fun to watch.

Yeah, they run races around the paddocks. All 3 are already spoken for, so they will be here until after the fair, so only here until end of Sept

Offline mountainmoma

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Re: mountainmoma's 2014 garden
« Reply #76 on: August 25, 2014, 12:06:33 PM »
I'm going to try and give a few garden overview pictures to contrast with the ones at the beginning of the thread with bare beds, but tomato plants are tall so you cant see all the way on any shot, there are 14 beds in the main garden, 7 rows of double beds, each bed is 4'x12', so 48 sq ft. My cultivated area is not realy bigger than anyone with a large yard could pull off.



This is taken standing on the southeast corner, looking back towards the house. Directly in front is a giant pumpkin plant in a bed with some corn, bed of strawberries then tomatoes.



I scooted over to the left, so this is southwest corner, angled shot to the Northeast. Same deal, corn to strawberries to tomatoes. You can glimpse the persimmon tree to the far right. dark background is a wooded strip on the edge of my yard(about 50 ft deep), dominated by a very large live oak.



Quail live in the brambles that are not too far from this bottom bed, so I took the cover off the fill in corn as it was big enough not to get pulled by crows, but the quail nibbled off the tops. It is alive, so we will see what it does. This is the empty looking spot in the previous pictures corn bed.



Taken from the middle of the 7 rows on the east side facing west. In front is stall cleanings dumped by my daughter I  havent felt well enough to spread between the pants. Double tomato beds on left, double second potato planting in center, then double misc veggie beds that need attention and to be replanted with fall stuff. Behind the tomatoes is my largest and oldest apple tree, Hudson Golden gem on M111 (large) rootstock. I do not water it. Apples not quite ready, will be first real crops worth. tried one yesterday, almost there. Tree to its right is the cherry tree that is so damaged by root borers I need to take it out, background is the chestnut tree and behind that another large live oak and wood fence -- end of yard.



Almost directly opposite side, backed up against cherry tree branches, so cant get as much in, potato beds are to my right, more corn to the left, row after corn is the butternut squash in west bed, beans in east bed. In front of me are the veggie beds that need attention. A few pepper plants have survived, but the night have become cool so not counting on much there, the lone surviving summer squash plant is more than enough for 2 people



As prolific as you would expect out of a summer squash, dont know why it has such huge leaves



This should be a shot off of the deck, North of garden looking south to compare to start of season. But, this free hosting site is being wierd, so we'll see. Back ground is a couple pear trees that dont realy show up and then a complete mess of blackberry brambles that eat up money each spring in hired help cutting them back. But, the lst few weeks they are giving us all the good berries we love.



This is not in the main garden, but over by the barn. Orange tree still holding fruit, so must be getting just enough water and fertility, it is a long ahul to get these to next january.


« Last Edit: August 25, 2014, 12:30:24 PM by mountainmoma »

Offline mountainmoma

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Re: mountainmoma's 2014 garden
« Reply #77 on: October 03, 2014, 11:04:40 PM »

This is the wine I am fermenting from the Muscat grapes growing unkempt on a fence and up the manchurian apricot trees. My first attempt at fermenting alcohol. I also gave a way more than 5 gallon bucket of these grapes to another household to ferment.



apples all over the front room, most gleaned elsewhere and some from here, getting too hot and I havent had time to process it all yet.


Some I have managed to put thru the spiral apple slicer and out on the deck to dry. We love, love, love dried apples in the winter. Easy to pack for snacks for my daughter when she is away from home. I have to bring these in at night, then re-lay out again the next day to keep the critters from eating them at night -- so kind of a pain, but we need to get them dry, and it is way to hot to use the dehydrator right now



The prickly pear fruit is starting to color up. My plans for it is to ferment into wine. This one is doing well, it is by the persimmon tree and gets water, but the one up by the goats must be drought stressed as it is dropping some of the fruit before it is ripe.



Persimmon tree is also starting to color up earlier than usual. We like to dry this fruit -- so we realy have to get done with apples and tomatoes before these ripen !



Offline mountainmoma

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Re: mountainmoma's 2014 garden
« Reply #78 on: October 03, 2014, 11:26:42 PM »


Taken yesterday, corn alot more mature than last set of pictures. Ears forming and bees all over it helping to move the pollen around.



closer up of the corn and pumpkins. heat stressed as per usual, hot right now.



Close up from the other side of these same pumpkins. We will likely get 3 total, which will be fine for halloween purposes. 2 are cinderella pumpkins, and one pumpkin is the real large halloween ones.



Top half of the garden. 3rd corn patch, and other things shown below...



This butternut squash bed is next to the upper corn, shaping up well.



New zealand spinach still growing like crazy and we are eating quite a bit of it. Tomatoes I didnt take a picture of, but are still going strong. We have been likeing a Spanish peasant dish with these : New zealand spinach, fresh tomatoes, a zuchini, sometimes onions, sometimes not. Saute all together, then when about done crack eggs on top in seperate places, put a lid on it and let the eggs poach until yolks barely hard. Serve with homemade rustic no-knead sourdough bread.


Bed of July planted potatoes are heat stressed, we will see, it is an experiment



Filling in winter garden in the area where the cucumbers died. So, zuchini still going strong, front of bed has brocolli down the one side, parsley in front, and a few cauliflower



Bed in front of that had the brasicas in the spring/early summer, now going to winter veggies. Back and right side is parsley, these are leeks for part of the bed. Rest of bed blank waiting for root veggies, see if I can get out there.


Offline AvenueQ

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Re: mountainmoma's 2014 garden
« Reply #79 on: October 05, 2014, 05:47:48 AM »
Is the New Zealand spinach a heat-tolerant variety? 'Cause I love fresh spinach but can't get mine to grow due to a lack of cool spring weather where I live. Also that recipe sounds delicious, wish I'd had it a few weeks ago when I had squash coming out my ears from my CSA. Who knows, I might still get some this week ::)

Offline mountainmoma

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Re: mountainmoma's 2014 garden
« Reply #80 on: October 05, 2014, 07:42:57 AM »
New zealand spinach is not a true spinach, it is very heat resistant. It has been thriving, spreading. I do not have cool spring weather either, it is cold and then it switches to hot. I have used this in quite a few recipes and in salads this summer.

http://www.gardening.cornell.edu/homegardening/scenef2e7.html
« Last Edit: October 05, 2014, 07:50:02 AM by mountainmoma »

Offline jamendjr

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Re: mountainmoma's 2014 garden
« Reply #81 on: October 22, 2014, 10:48:06 AM »
I got nothing, just wow. You guys on here put me to shame!

Offline mountainmoma

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Re: mountainmoma's 2014 garden
« Reply #82 on: October 27, 2014, 08:56:41 PM »
Borrowed my girls phone to take picture today Garden is still hanging in there with the warm weather stuff


still picking tomatoes




strawberries are everbearing, not enough to can, but enough for daily eating on yogurt or whateve, a few new flowers too



the pink popcorn is not ready to harvest yet, and absolutely the worst tomato worms we have ever had, probably due to last years mild winter, so I went and pulled apart the ears and pulled off as many as I could find, I know gross picyure of them in the bucket, and fed these to the chickens



Still waiting on opuntia and persimmons to finish ripening



persimmons getting realy close, but there are so many of them !



Winter crops growing, leeks and parsley



One of the new winter brocollis is already forming