Survivalism & Self Sufficiency Topics > BOV Emergency Kits

My trunk tools in use

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lettuceman:
Think about where you can store spare lamps.  We have had several headlight failures so I have a spare lamp in the console with the tools to replace that item.

jhull87:
I think any tool kit is better than none but as a guy that's turned wrenches for a few years there is something to be said for quality. A couple hours on  your back and you'll realize it pretty quick. I'd recommend the Crasftman Pro Line for anyone that can spare the extra cash. Plus you walk away with a lifetime warrsnty. If you're a little on the strapped for cash side (I know I am but as a mechanic I can write my tools off so this isn't meant to offend anyone) the Harbor Freight Pittsburgh line isn't as good of quality but is life time warranty as well. I think tools should be thought of as an invesent and therefore a lifetime purchase.

Tyler Durden:

--- Quote from: jhull87 on November 15, 2014, 04:17:11 PM --- the Harbor Freight Pittsburgh line isn't as good of quality but is life time warranty as well. I think tools should be thought of as an invesent and therefore a lifetime purchase.

--- End quote ---

I'll second that.  If you do a lot of your own work you'll break some of them, but I've never had a problem returning them.  A few of their tools are actually pretty good (make a decent torque wrench).  Definitely good enough for the trunk of a car.  I just heard recently that craftsman doesn't have the lifetime replacement on all of their tools anymore.  Anybody else heard this?

r_w:
Don't forget something to keep the jack from sinking in the mud. 

big trash bags--big enough to hold the full size tire because it won't always fit where the donut was and needs to ride on a seat.  Also work as a ground cloth and poncho.

Baling wire and duct tape.  Wire coat hanger works as well.  Something to hold bits that are falling off, like tailpipes or bumper plastic after a minor accident.  Keeping them from dragging lets you leave on your terms, not forced to get towed...

I used to carry old climbing rope and enough stuff to rig a block and tackle.  I could get enough leverage to pull my little car out of the ditch alone.  Doesn't work with my truck, though.

Carl:
I like the low profile of a scissor jack and they are less prone to problems of hydraulic jacks.
One can air up the flat or drive up on a board or rock to gain clearance for a bottle jack,
but a screw type scissor jack makes for easy work...if snow and ice or bad roads...
a come-along and some chain is also a good idea...put them next to the shovel.

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