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EPISODE-726- ALTERNATIVE ENERGY PRODUCTION Q&A SESSION WITH STEVEN HARRIS

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Hootie:
<16:54>
Jack Spirko: Ok. Next one here says, "I asked about about building a small gasifier on a lawnmower quad trailer, but forgot the heart of the question. I know there are popular plans for an easy to build FEMA gasifier. I understand it makes tar. Other units are more complicated to build, but filter out the tar. I can live with making tar since I plan to run salvage lawn mower engine and spin an alternator, but i would like to weight the options between the two. How long would it take tar to damage the motor? If it takes a week, I might want to filter it out. If it takes years, I wouldn't care since my free lawnmower engine might not last that long anyways. Thanks, Mike"


Steven Harris: Mike, it all depends on how good your filtering is. The FEMA gasifier which is HGGVE 3 and 4 (Hydrogen Generator Gas for Vehicles and Engines: Volumes 3 and 4) has pretty good filtering in it. Adding a water based filter would improve the gas quality. There are some water filters HGGVE book number 6. Tar buildup could become a problem in weeks to a few months to a few years. Depending on how often you are running it. Depending what your feed material is. Depends if you are changing out your filter material. Many times you have 3 filters. You have a rough filter, a finer filter, a water filter, and then you might have a forth filter. The first filter might be running the gas through a bunch of leaves and the tar will condense on the leaves. Then the gas will go through a bunch of dry grass or straw as the second filter. Then it might be pushed through a water bubbler and bubble into the water. Then you might have the gas go through something like an automotive engin air cleaner filter as a 4th filter. When you start building up stuff on your first and second filters, which are the leaves and the grass. You take that stuff out of your filter, which is usually a barrel and you put it into the gasifier as fuel. You put more leaves or more grass into the two filters as new filter material and you keep on running. You are going to get tar build up based upon: How good you are filtering. How ofter you change your filter material. What your material is that you are running. Hotter tand the quicker you can run, the better. It could become an issue in weeks or months. It is more that it will become an issue in month to a year. To take care of that, what you do is take the heads of the engine. You take a cleaner and clean off the tar with a light hydro carbon. It could be gasoline, it could be alcohol, or it could be acetone. All of those things will clean out the top of a motor just fine.
 
<19:46>

Hootie:
<19:46>
Jack Spirko: It is not at big a deal to do. Especially with a little something you talked about. A little system run by a lawnmower engine. If you know anything about lawnmower engines, it is a pretty easy job to do, right?

Steven Harris: Yeah, it is. I did tar up one of my Honda generators, my fancy eu2000i. It was a pain. I had to spend $500 having someone take it apart, because the whole thing had to come apart. It is a real detailed engine. Using a simpler Honda engine or a simpler lawnmower engine. The top part comes right off. There is the value. There is the cylinder. There is the piston. It just takes a little fuel or acetone and clean it out and continue on.

Jack Spirko: Very very cool. Sometimes the simpler motor is better depending on the application and how well you can set the system up, to begin with.

Steven Harris: You can say that again. Keep it simple.

Jack Spirko: Cool cool. One more question on wood gasification, before we start to do some different questions here. Guy wants to know, "What are some rough guide lines, on how many pound of wood waste (chips, dust, etc...) does it take to create energy equivalency of a gallon of gasoline? How many trees do i need to chop down to make a gallon of gas?"

<20:54>

Hootie:
<20:54>
 
Steven Harris: This is a fabulous question. It really puts it into perspective. How many pounds of wood or waste material to make the equivalent as if you running off a gallon of gasoline? The answer to that is about 20 to 30 pounds of dry weight of wood or the equivalent material, will make the generator produce the same amount of electricity as if it was a gallon of gasoline. There is another caveat to it. If you had this on your car and you were driving your car off wood gas. The historical proven numbers are that it takes between 1lbs to 1.5lbs of wood pre mile you drive. Now how is that for economics?

Jack Spirko: That is pretty good. If you pick up a good size chunk of hardwood log it is fairly heavy.

<21:47>

Hootie:
<21:47>
Steven Harris: Wood is pretty dense. Sawdust is real light and fluffy. Wood chips are more dense. Pieces of wood cut into cubes the size of 1in by 1in are even more dense. That is what you need to run in a gasifier. You got to run broken up material. You need to cube the wood or you got to shred the wood or you got to chip the wood. You got to have something. You just can't do it with whole logs.

 
Jack Spirko: Of course. Next question then. "How can you use a rocket stove to heat a room in the house?"

Steven Harris: You will never use a "real rocket stove" to heat a room in your house because you will end up dead. It is an open flame. It is producing carbon monoxide. However there is something called a rocket heater, some times the word stove is put into it. It is a rocket stove design that is contained with a bunch of heat exchanges, like a 55 gallon barrel. The the exhaust goes underneath a bed of concrete. It heats up the thermal mass and then it exhausts outside. There is a great book on the subject and there is a great video subject on youtube. Jack will put it in his show notes. I'll put it on solar1234.com for you to go take a look at. It's on YouTube. It doesn't cost anything. It is a fabulous book, but don't run any open flame combustion from wood, or anything like that, inside your house ever.

<23:29>

Hootie:
<23:29>

Jack Spirko: Agreed. One thing on the rocket mass heater, folks. There is a lot of applications for that. I'll save my thoughts on that for later, because we have got a question where Steven doesn't mention, i am going to. It is one of the really great technologies for you to learn about because if you do it right, and you get the exhaust right, it is a very very clean exhaust. Not something that you want to breath like Steve saying, "You will be dead if you do that." It is basically CO2 and water that comes out the end. There are tremendous application for it. It is very simple technology. It is something that anybody can do, with parts from Home Depot or Lowes. Let's run on here then. The next question is "I would like to know if it would be worth the effort to produce alcohol as a fuel for a vehicle or generator? Is the conversion cost worth the saves? What should I use? Such as corn, sugar cane,... what have you?"

Steven Harris:  Oh boy. What a question? I could do an entire show. I could do two entire shows on nothing but the subject of making fuel alcohol for you car. There are so many ways of doing it. It is really pretty straight forward. It is absolutely legal to make fuel alcohol. In fact the permit is free from the federal government. It is either cheap or easy to get it from the state or not required. To answer the question, "What do you use?"  You want to use waste material. Now you can use 2 things. You can use anything starch. You can use 3 or 4 day old doughnuts for the bakery. They can give those to you. There is sugar and starch in those. You convert the starch over to sugar. I'll tell you about that in a minute you can go get farm bread for the discount bread store or directly from the bakery. Farm bread, is bread that is way out of expiration that they sell to farms for feeding the pigs. You could use wheat or you could use corn that is no good for humans that is being rejected, even for animal feed. You could use that, maybe it has a mold or a fungus in it. That will work good. Pastry sweeping from a bakery. Flour and dough work great, that is a starch. One of the better sources will be waste Cola sirup from you local bottling company. That is just straight sugar. If you can get that, and they generally have it by the drum and by the tanker load. You can ferment that directly with yeast. That makes a solution, "a beer" that you then distill to make an alcohol. If you are running with the free starch, the free bakery material, the free corn, the free doughnuts. You have to convert the starch over to a sugar. You use 2 enzymes, a alpha amylase and glucal amylase. You heat up the water and put in one enzyme. Let it work for 30mins to 1hr. Then you heat it up a little more and put in the second enzyme. Then you cool the whole thing down. It is converted all your starches over to sugars just like you do in your mouth and your stomach. Then you ferment those sugars with yeast and you can use champagne yeast, if you want a 18% yield. You can use special turbo yeast to get a 24% alcohol yield. Or you can use your straight Red Star yeast, right off the grocery store to get about 11% yield of alcohol. Then you run that through a still, which i a whole other subject. Depending on how the still is made  you can get 190 proof alcohol that will run in your vehicle directly. You can run up to 50% alcohol in any car today, any gasoline car today with no modification to the vehicle at all. You can actually run E85 in your standard gasoline car right now. Between 20%, 30%, 40%, or 50%. You start off at 20% it runs fine. Go to 30% runs fine. Go to 40% runs fine. If you notice any hesitation. Any lack of power. It doesn't feel like it isn't igniting properly then you back off from 50% to 40% and you only go up to 40%. Gasoline and alcohol mixes great

<28:04>

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