Survivalism & Self Sufficiency Topics > Amateur Radio How-To's

All Band Single Wire Antenna,The Zeppelin

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Carl:
This is a very different antenna by todays standards but it is easy and effective and works well
on 10 through 80 meters with use of a tuner . It is easy to describe and build.

It is a COAX FED 4 to 1 balun attached to a 17 foot long piece of 450 ohm ladder line
and a 67 foot long piece of wire attached to one side of the ladder line. This antenna will work
with gain and does well horizontal at 10 feet above earth as an NVIS antenna .

If 92 feet of wire is used instead of 67 ,it can even cover 160 meters and all bands to 10 meters.



I use a version of this and often call it my End Fed Half wave...67 feet of wire and a 17 foot 6 inch wire attached to a 4 to one balun for 6 through 80 meters, or 35 and 17'6" for 6 through 40 meters...it is easy and effective and you can carry it in a pocket.

Smurf Hunter:
Carl,

Does the orientation of the 67 foot wire section matter?

e.g. If the ladder line portion is running vertically up the side of my house, could the single wire part lay across my roof?
Also, can that 67' portion be angled or must it be in a straight continuous section to resonate properly?

Carl:

--- Quote from: Smurf Hunter on February 08, 2015, 11:21:30 AM ---Carl,

Does the orientation of the 67 foot wire section matter?

e.g. If the ladder line portion is running vertically up the side of my house, could the single wire part lay across my roof?
Also, can that 67' portion be angled or must it be in a straight continuous section to resonate properly?

--- End quote ---

Glad you asked that. Straight lines are easier to draw.

The ladder line should be kept at least a foot from the earth and at least a foot from metal objects.
The wire 67 foot or 85 foot can be horizontal,part (or all) vertical, bent but not passed back within 3 feet of itself. Pretty much keep from 'clotheslining people' and it will work ,If run mostly at or about 10 feet you gain NVIS local coverage while retaining good distance capability.

Building,trees,metal objects near the antenna ALL effect it , but it is NOT a tuned length and the tuner makes adjustment while the antenna does a good job at getting your RF on it's way.

Also note that the ladder line is to get your signal to the antenna ( and perform matching )and when used portable all you need is the lengths of wire (total of 85 and 17 foot)and a 4 to 1 balun plus the all important TUNER.

TexasGirl:
Carl,

Is there any RF returning on the outside of the coax shield?  It's common for Windoms to do that from the balun to the rig, it's a property of unbalance.  Many people add ferrite chokes and such at shack entry / grounding points to prevent this.  I see some similarities between this design and a Windom, balance-wise.

Sad thing is most people forget to use an S meter in the shack after a new antenna install to see if they are bathing themselves in RF while keying.

~TG

Carl:
There can be some RF though the balun and a not mentioned common mode choke will knock it out. a 20 foot or so length of coax in a coil about 6 in diameter or so near the balun.  Antennas radiate and so they all expose you to some RF,though this antenna ,being NOT a half wave on any current band tends to avoid the exposure within the operating area.

This antenna was designed in the 30's and called ZEP because of early use on airships...or so I have read.

A proper dipole for each band is hard to do,but one of the best ways to do it. This is just an easy compromise that works well for many who have tried it. I have used one portable ,because it is easy to toss it in a tree and be on the air.

I don't yet know of a perfect antenna...but I am looking.

TG and anyone interested ,here is an interesting series to read about antennas ,SWR,and we can all gain something from it.

Just follow the link at the bottom of each page ...

http://www.qsl.net/arrlsb/Digest/Pages/Antennas/antennas03.html

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