Armory, Self Defense, And EDC > Bows and Arrows

first Bow

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RobisMarshall:
@ steve Cover
I made my  arrows out of dow rods from home depo cut the notches to fit the string on both bows and used sharped fragments of a can from cand food for the tips which i cut slits into and glued in with duck tape fletches there the right length to my pull will these be goo arrows?

Steve Cover:

--- Quote from: RobisMarshall on March 18, 2013, 11:15:40 PM ---@ steve Cover
I made my  arrows out of dow rods from home depo cut the notches to fit the string on both bows and used sharped fragments of a can from cand food for the tips which i cut slits into and glued in with duck tape fletches there the right length to my pull will these be goo arrows?

--- End quote ---
From your description it is hard for me to tell.
Chances are not at all.

As earlier stated, arrows need to be stiffness matched to a bow to fly right.
Your arrows may be a correct match for one of your bows, but can't be a match for both bows.

A little more about stiffness and arrow making:
Wood arrows naturally have a grain aspect.
Wood grain should be straight along the entire length of the arrow.
Any other orientation like found in cheap dowels can be dangerous.
(You don't want a 3/8th inch sliver in your bow arm.)

Also, the tree ring pattern visible at each end of the arrow shaft must be perpendicular to the string of each arrow.
Arrows are stiffer against this grain than with it.
Randomly clock nocked arrows will bend differently than each other and be unable to group together. (No accuracy)

Arrows also need to be balanced to some extent.
Larger fletch helps keep the center of gravity in a reasonable location when using heavier arrow heads.
For light weight target points, a smaller fletch is needed.
Your duck tape fletching may work fine... Be sure to trim them all to the same shape.

There are several steps in making good arrows in a wilderness survival situation.
Balancing weight and stiffness still come into play.

Trying to learn to shoot with unmatched arrows is near impossible.

You don't need a set of expensive match grade target arrows, but you do need a good set for each bow.

You get what you pay for.


Steve

Steve Cover:
More on arrows.

Here is a short video on the basics.

http://video.search.yahoo.com/video/play;_ylt=A2KLqIUPqEhRAX4Aiir8w8QF;_ylu=X3oDMTBzNDFydTBvBHNlYwNjZC1leHAEc2xrA2V4cAR2dGlkA1YxMzE-?p=arrow+making&vid=c9e746daddde64f28a65c02a50c91529&ct=p&l=6%3A27&turl=http%3A%2F%2Fts3.mm.bing.net%2Fth%3Fid%3DV.4909539382329514%26pid%3D15.1&rurl=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DUpKDsQCoC50&tit=Arrow+Making&c=1&sigr=11a3kevkd&back=http%3A%2F%2Fsearch.yahoo.com%2Fsearch%3Fei%3DUTF-8%26p%3Darrow%2Bmaking%26fr%3Dyfp-t-900-32&sigb=126lcb75k&b=0&age=0&&tt=s

I can't over emphasize the importance of learning to shoot using good arrows.

Steve

RobisMarshall:
sorry for the stupid questions but just trying to make sure im grasping the concept, He was talking about the v's is that the tree ring you're talking about? if so i just need to make sure that they go straight the length of the dowel before i use it?


then how do i check the grain and what exactly am i looking for for a 50 pound bow and i dont have any tools to check the stiffness like in the video, is there any way of checking it with out that tool? thanks for all the help

Rob

Steve Cover:

--- Quote from: RobisMarshall on March 19, 2013, 01:01:02 PM ---sorry for the stupid questions but just trying to make sure im grasping the concept, He was talking about the v's is that the tree ring you're talking about? if so i just need to make sure that they go straight the length of the dowel before i use it?

then how do i check the grain and what exactly am i looking for for a 50 pound bow and i dont have any tools to check the stiffness like in the video, is there any way of checking it with out that tool? thanks for all the help

Rob

--- End quote ---
No such thing as a stupid question, Rob.
We all started where you are and would have never learned anything if we hadn't asked.

Here is a site that addresses arrow making pretty well.

www.stickbow.com/stickbow/arrowbuilding

There is an illustration in the nock alignment section showing how the wood grain should be aligned for all arrows.
He also goes into detail on how to determine your draw length.

You really need to buy some ready made arrows to match your bow before you try to make any.

Good low end arrows run about $45.00 a half dozen.
Premium wood arrows can cost as much as $90.00, but you don't need those to learn with.
You save a little per arrow by getting a dozen, but are now in the $100.00+ cost range.

A set of arrows for a 20 pound bow shouldn't be nearly as expensive.
Just be sure they match the bow weight.

Here are a couple of sites that offer finished arrows:

The first is the Footed Shaft.
I've been dealing with Lamont for some time.
I get all of my arrow building material from him.
He and his staff are very knowledgeable and can help you decide on your best options.

www.footedshaftllc.com/catalog
888.288.7581

His cedar hunting arrows are an excellent bargain at $45.00 a half dozen.
They would be my choice for your 50 pound bow.
His staff will cut them to your draw length and put points on them for you. (cost of points is extra)
I suggest field points... Get their opinion.
Also ask about getting a set of matched arrows for the 20 pounder.
They should be relatively inexpensive.

Another place to check out is Rose City Archery.

www.rosecityarchery.com

They also offer a good line of finished wooden arrows.
Their prices are a little higher, and are sold by the dozen, but the arrows are also a little nicer.

If you decide that you really like archery and want to expand, making your own strings and arrows is a hobby all its own.
Once you get the kind of expensive tools, you can save big time on equipment and customize it to your wants.

Good luck,

Steve


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