Survivalism & Self Sufficiency Topics > Food Preps

Bone stock/broth

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Carver:
It is good to keep in mind that broth and stock are not the same. A stock made from vegetables makes for a good soup base but a vegetable broth tends to get bitter, not better. Bone or meat broth is not a stock. The best of both is cook the bones with the meat on until the meat pulls off and put that in a separate pot with vegetables and cook until the veggies are done. Meanwhile cook the bones for hours so that when it cools it gels from the collagen. A good example of a combined stock/broth recipe is hog's head cheese, which commonly uses the hocks and neck bones, not the head. The broth is poured over the meat and vegetables in a cake pan and is sliced when it is cooled and gelled.

My own personal version of this is to add cooked barley and you end up with a meat pie. I have some in the refrigerator right now.

Morning Sunshine:
I have pots simmering now.  I beg for friends turkey carcasses after thanksgiving, and added to all the chicken scraps I collect over the year, I get about 60 quarts.  I have been doing this for about 14 years.

I simmer and strain, simmer and strain until the strained water is cloudy and almost white.  I mix it all together and cook it down.  I also add veggies - a mire poix with the addition of parsnips (not this year though - more in a minute).
I skim off the fat (I usually get about 2 quarts of schmaltz, and add a bit of that to the cats food during the winter).
In years past, I take the condensed broth and put about 1 cup in a quart jar, then add water to the fill line.  It is based on color and flavor, but I have to condense it as I do not have a pot big enough to make sure everything gets mixed up.

This year, I am doing it different.  This year I am taking my broth and simmering it down until it starts smelling "done" - like the water is all gone and it is going to burn soon.  Then I will mix it with a heap of salt (I do not generally salt my broth) and some finely-ground dehydrated veggies and herbs, and dehydrate the whole mess.  And then blend to a fine powder.

I make my own bullion.  After I did it last time, we made it up with a cup of water and measured the powder - it turned out that 1.5 teaspoons made 1 cup of flavorful broth.  And I could get 32 "quarts" of broth into one quart jar.  I do keep it in the fridge, but that is just my paranoia. I am hoping to get 1-2 more quart jars in the fridge by New Years.

Prepper456:
thanks sunshine

Carver:

--- Quote from: Morning Sunshine on December 20, 2019, 07:50:41 AM ---This year, I am doing it different.  This year I am taking my broth and simmering it down until it starts smelling "done" - like the water is all gone and it is going to burn soon.  Then I will mix it with a heap of salt (I do not generally salt my broth) and some finely-ground dehydrated veggies and herbs, and dehydrate the whole mess.  And then blend to a fine powder

--- End quote ---

How did this turn out? And how are you using it?

Morning Sunshine:

--- Quote from: Carver on April 03, 2020, 11:51:50 AM ---
How did this turn out? And how are you using it?

--- End quote ---

it is great.  This is my new favorite way.  Like I said, I added a lot of salt and boiled it down to the point where it started to smell like it was going to burn.  I think I still had a little over 2 quarts.  Then I poured it onto my silicone dehydrator mats.  it did spread, like fruit puree, so I did not put too much on one tray.  It took a few days, and I had to turn it over every 12 hours or so, as the top would get a dry crust leaving moisture trapped underneath.  When I turned it over, I would also place another mat on top and use a rolling pin to flatten it, help it dry faster.

When it was all done, I threw it in the blender until it was a fine powder.  Then I brought a cup of water to a boil and added a teaspoon of powder.  It was kind of weak flavor, so I added another 1/2 teaspoon.  perfect.

This is much easier than opening a quart of broth from the basement, and hoping that we would use it all before the jar goes bad.  This way we can use 1 cup at a time or 1/2 c or whatever and not worry about the waste.  I do keep it in the fridge, and I have another quart jar in the deep freezer for when this runs out.

honestly, I have thought about opening the 20 or so jars of beef broth in my basement and boiling those down.  But too much work.  :P

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