Author Topic: Canada to Stage Helicopter Wolf Hunt  (Read 429 times)

nelson96

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Canada to Stage Helicopter Wolf Hunt
« on: January 19, 2015, 11:17:31 AM »
Quote
Ottawa (AFP) - A government plan to shoot up to 184 wolves from a helicopter to reduce their population and save caribou herds in western Canada

http://news.yahoo.com/canada-stage-helicopter-wolf-hunt-save-caribou-230032076.html

Offline Cedar

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Re: Canada to Stage Helicopter Wolf Hunt
« Reply #1 on: January 19, 2015, 11:24:56 AM »
When I first went to work as a vet tech in northern BC, they were talking about using me as a technician to spay alpha female wolves for some program up there. No idea where that idea has gone.

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Offline David in MN

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Re: Canada to Stage Helicopter Wolf Hunt
« Reply #2 on: January 19, 2015, 11:36:00 AM »
We hear them in northern MN howl at night. I understand the noble intentions of reintroducing animals but wolves and people have a troubled past. Reestablishing (and then protecting) an apex predator seems like a risky gambit.

Offline trekker111

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Re: Canada to Stage Helicopter Wolf Hunt
« Reply #3 on: January 20, 2015, 05:37:35 AM »
I still keep in touch with high school friends who say that the wolves in north west Michigan have decimated the deer herd to the point seeing a deer is rare.

I can understand the wolves having a place, but they can't be allowed to overrun that place, and if standard hunting is not keeping the population down....

I say lock & load and spin the rotors.

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Re: Canada to Stage Helicopter Wolf Hunt
« Reply #4 on: January 20, 2015, 10:31:29 AM »
Part of the problem is that they are 're-introducing' species of wolves that were not indigenous to the area as well. Many of the places are bringing in Canadian Timber Wolves from what I understand which are 2x the size of the ones historically from the area they are 're-introducing' them into.

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Offline never_retreat

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Re: Canada to Stage Helicopter Wolf Hunt
« Reply #5 on: January 20, 2015, 11:54:47 AM »
Maybe they can introduce some sort of large wolf eating snake. :rofl:

Offline trekker111

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Re: Canada to Stage Helicopter Wolf Hunt
« Reply #6 on: January 20, 2015, 11:42:20 PM »
We are having the same problems in SC with coyotes. Coyotes have never been indigenous to SC. Our apex predators historically were wolves, black bear, mountain lion, and alligators, with red and grey fox, and bob cats, filling in to prey on smaller prey.

Our DNR introduced coyotes awhile back, and they have been
Riding roughshod over the ecosystem. They have bred with feral dogs, and reportedly the red wolves released in north Carolina (another issue on the horizon), to become much larger and stronger. No longer are they the solitary hunters of the plains eating mice and rabbits. Now they are pack hunters killing everything from rabbits, to family pets, to full grown mature deer. The turkey population has suffered the most. The adults can usually fly away but the ones too young to fly suffer very high mortality. I haven't seen a red fox in years, and there are fewer grey fox. Deer behavior has changed dramatically. And the dnr is literally begging people to kill as many as they can, begging the legislature to pass laws easing restrictions on night hunting. I asked for a depredation permit and was given one with literally no restrictions, and instructions to kill coyotes however I see fit.

Our indigenous animal populations are suffering under the onslaught of animals introduced from elsewhere. Hogs being the other main culprit.

The Canada situation is different in that the wolves have always been there, it's just that their population is getting out of hand. Areas of Alaska are suffering the same.

If balance is not maintained, disaster will ensue. My only reservation against shooting wolves from a helicopter is the possibility for waste. The hides can be rather valuable. The highschool friend I spoke of in my previous post got a tag and harvested a wolf. He got nearly $400 for the hide. Granted he still runs a trap line and is good at hide prep, I haven't done much trapping since I left Michigan 15 years ago. It would be sad to l know the hides were left to rot, but weighed against the other issues caused by their overpopulation, it may even out.

Offline David in MN

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Re: Canada to Stage Helicopter Wolf Hunt
« Reply #7 on: January 21, 2015, 05:56:00 AM »
Is this an issue because they look like dogs (read cute)? I've seen firsthand an idiot try to get close to a "cute" bear. I don't care to repeat my language.

I don't know where the anthropomorphizing problem began. Disney? Cartoons? Plain old stupidity? Bears, wolves, coyotes, even mountain lions have been almost deified in our culture. It seems we've forgotten that the wolf is a bad actor in many fairy tales. There's a reason.

nelson96

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Re: Canada to Stage Helicopter Wolf Hunt
« Reply #8 on: February 06, 2015, 10:00:15 AM »
Emailed to me today from a friend that lives in Montana. . . .

RMEF Calls Out Center for Biological Diversity: Stick to the Facts
MISSOULA, Mont.—The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation is calling on the environmentalist group Center for Biological Diversity (CBD) to stick to the facts when making presumptions about wildlife populations.

CBD recently claimed that Idaho’s wolf population is on the verge of endangered status when, in reality, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) stated that preliminary counts indicate Idaho has more than 100 documented wolf packs and 600-plus wolves. IDFG also reported it has a minimum of 22 documented breeding pairs after counting only 30 packs. IDFG biologists have yet to examine the status of 77 additional packs.

“A few advocacy groups chose to take the breeding pair metric out of context to make claims that Idaho wolves are ‘teetering on the brink of endangered status once again.’ That’s hogwash,” said Virgil Moore, IDFG director. “And it’s the kind of polarizing misinformation that undermines responsible wildlife conservation and management in Idaho.”

“It is not surprising when you consider this group’s intent on stirring the pot to dilute the facts in order to raise emotions and money,” said David Allen, RMEF president and CEO. “Groups like CBD do not really want states to manage wolves and they don’t really want states to be successful in managing wolves. Facts are facts and it is a clear fact that none of the states managing wolves in the Greater Yellowstone Region are remotely close to low numbers of breeding pairs or total wolf population. These groups would rather file a lawsuit and collect their legal fees from the U.S. taxpayers than actually work with the states to better manage all the wildlife populations together.”

History shows that to be true. A 2012 report used Department of Justice data that showed the federal government defended more than 570 Endangered Species Act-related lawsuits (wolves included) over a four-year period which cost American taxpayers more than $15 million in attorney fees. CBD was, by far, the most litigious organization with 117 cases.

“Groups like CBD excel at taking advantage of the Equal Access to Justice Act (EAJA) which was never intended to fund lawsuits by NGOs to promote ideology. What they don’t excel at, to say the least, is conducting wildlife counts,” said Allen.

IDFG is expected to release its final 2014 wolf population estimate in March. The minimum number of documented wolves as of December 31, 2013, was estimated at 659 or more than 500 percent above minimum recovery levels agreed upon during wolf reintroduction in the mid-1990s. The 659 figure did not include wolves from 28 documented border packs that overlapped with Montana, Wyoming and Washington. IDFG presumes there are additional packs within its borders but are not included due to a lack of documentation.

“The bottom line is Idaho’s wolf population is not endangered in the least and it’s vital that state management remain in place in order to whittle the population closer to balanced recovery levels where they should be and where EVERYONE agreed the numbers should be. CBD did not object to the recovery goals in 1995, but now they and other groups like them pretend they never heard of the recovery goals,” added Allen.

In keeping with the North American Model of Wildlife Conservation, RMEF supports state-regulated hunting and trapping as the preferred tools of wolf management. RMEF staunchly supports management to balance and control predator populations.

RMEF has awarded nearly $265,000 in grants to various states specifically for wolf management activities including $50,000 to Idaho in 2013. No other groups have granted any financial resources for any type of predator management including CBD.