Armory, Self Defense, And EDC > Bows and Arrows

Crossbow Basics.

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welshman:
I have learned to make my own crossbows and wooden bolts

DDJ:
I was going to sty out of this but as I read on I think I may have a few points.  I must throw out a disclaimer before I go any further.  My bow was purchased as an "Economy" bow back in 1985.  It is a Steel prod recurve bow.   It has spent the last 18 or so years just hanging around and is just going back into service.

1) Look at the sites that come with your bow before you dismiss the use of a scope.  My bow came with a "CHEAP" peep site on the rear that lasted a total of 3 shots.  It was also equipped with a 22Style dovetail scope channel.  I used the Tusco scope off of a 1980s marlin 60 for years until the rail pealed off.  I am not saying that you need a $400 scope but replacing the $0.50 peep site with $40 reddot turned a hunk of junk into a usable tool.
2) Know your limitations.  As mentioned earlier the ballistics are not any better with a crossbow than a compound.  They are by no stretch quite but they do not require hearing protection either. 
3) Look at the fit and finish of your string path.  The string rides on the channel the arrow sits in and if there are edges and snags then the life of your string will be reduced.
4) As a person who does not like heights I am not the most comfortable in my tree stand.  I will not stand up to get down.  I hope it is more respect than fear but it is what it is.  I rediscovered that I can only shoot left of center from my stand with my compound just Saturday.   The ability to shoot seated at odd angles is not there with a compond.  The cross bow will allow me to leave the safety bar in place and take a shot at an extra 30 degrees or so to my right.  Also since you cock the bow as soon as you are in the tree you only have one step to get ready to fire making less movement.
5)  Shoot one before you buy it.  I am sure that a) my preferences have changed and b) by trigger my have gotten worse, but...  The trigger pull on my old bow makes it no fun to shoot.  The pull must be 3 times that of any of the guns in my collection.  I do not have a gauge, but it is massive.  Holding the sites on target as I haul the trigger back is nerve racking.   I have always needed to wear gloves when shooting it for both the cocking and the trigger on my finger.

Crossbows have their place they are not a gun they are not a compound bow they are their own monster with the pluses and minuses all their own.

Steve Cover:

--- Quote from: DDJ on September 10, 2013, 11:06:23 AM ---I was going to sty out of this but as I read on I think I may have a few points.  I must throw out a disclaimer before I go any further.  My bow was purchased as an "Economy" bow back in 1985.  It is a Steel prod recurve bow.   It has spent the last 18 or so years just hanging around and is just going back into service.
<<< SNIP >>>
Crossbows have their place they are not a gun they are not a compound bow they are their own monster with the pluses and minuses all their own.

--- End quote ---

Very good points DDJ.
I'm glad you have joined in the discussion.

What brand of crossbow do you have?

The only metal prod crossbow that comes to mind is the aluminum prod Wammo crossbow of the 1960s.

The 1x optical sight I put on my crossbow has proved to be far superior to the factory installed sights that came on the bow.

Welcome aboard,

Steve

Knecht:
Ok, I'll join in the crossbow thread. Bought a used Barnett Rhino this year. It was quite cheap and mainly, it has easily detachable bow, which makes it much easier to transport. First I got some cheap bolts that mostly fell apart on first shot, but then I discovered this Sloveninan guy on ebay, who sells very well made bolts made not from regular carbon fiber, but from carbon fabric. Well priced. Also makes broadheads. Got a couple and they're good! The only problem I had was when one of the fletches fell off (not sure, but I might have hit it by another bolt on the target).
Wanna try some improvised bolts yet. I've made many bow arrows in the past, so bolts shouldn't be too big problem. I'll just need to control myself while forging the heads to make them lightweight enough - I know I tend to make arrowheads too large.

If anyone knew of spareparts for this old Rhino model (such as a retired, non functiuonal one you might have), please let me know. There's a part I'd like to change on mine.

CaptAmerica:
Very Nice, nice picture. I wrap my serving with Plumbers Teflon Tape. Easily reapplied when worn.

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