Author Topic: Rice Storage  (Read 6686 times)

Offline clarkw

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Rice Storage
« on: April 26, 2009, 05:39:25 PM »
Howdy,

I have a few questions about rice storage.  We have purchased several bags of rice and need to store them.  We have some food grade 5 gallon pails.  As to the rice, do we just put the rice, bag and all, into the pail and add a few oxygen absorbers, or do we put it in Mylar first?  If Mylar is the answer, does it need to be sealed or just placed into the pail with the oxygen absorbers?  If we use the oxygen absorbers, what is the calculation to know how many cc's of oxygen absorber packets?

Thanks for the help.

ClarkW

Offline union hill

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Re: Rice Storage
« Reply #1 on: April 26, 2009, 05:51:29 PM »
Howdy,

I have a few questions about rice storage.  We have purchased several bags of rice and need to store them.  We have some food grade 5 gallon pails.  As to the rice, do we just put the rice, bag and all, into the pail and add a few oxygen absorbers, or do we put it in Mylar first?  If Mylar is the answer, does it need to be sealed or just placed into the pail with the oxygen absorbers?  If we use the oxygen absorbers, what is the calculation to know how many cc's of oxygen absorber packets?

Thanks for the help.

ClarkW

It depends on how long you need/want it to keep. Mylar is less oxygen-permeable than the plastic buckets, so using buckets alone, O2 will diffuse in until the O2 absorbers can't absorb anymore.  Definitely seal the mylar, evacuate as much air as possible first (I have used either a foot-pump or a foodsealer).

To be exact on how many O2 absorbers, you need to know:
1) how many CC's each packet is rated to absorb ( 300cc or 2000 cc )
2) what is the volume of the bucket?
3) what percentage of the volume of the material you are storing is air space as packed
4) what percentage of air is oxygen ( 21% I think )

If you do the math you'll usually find that 3 or 4 packets are plenty, with a fudge factor of several times over.

Depending on your rotation schedule, buckets alone may be more than adequate, but if you want it to keep as long as possible, I'd add the mylar bags.

Offline Pathfinder

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Re: Rice Storage
« Reply #2 on: April 26, 2009, 07:10:41 PM »
It depends on how long you need/want it to keep. Mylar is less oxygen-permeable than the plastic buckets, so using buckets alone, O2 will diffuse in until the O2 absorbers can't absorb anymore.  Definitely seal the mylar, evacuate as much air as possible first (I have used either a foot-pump or a foodsealer).

To be exact on how many O2 absorbers, you need to know:
1) how many CC's each packet is rated to absorb ( 300cc or 2000 cc )
2) what is the volume of the bucket?
3) what percentage of the volume of the material you are storing is air space as packed
4) what percentage of air is oxygen ( 21% I think )

If you do the math you'll usually find that 3 or 4 packets are plenty, with a fudge factor of several times over.

Depending on your rotation schedule, buckets alone may be more than adequate, but if you want it to keep as long as possible, I'd add the mylar bags.

I was planning to use a co2 pack with mylar bags for the rice, and add 3 O2 absorbers for good measure. Overkill?

Offline union hill

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Re: Rice Storage
« Reply #3 on: April 26, 2009, 07:25:41 PM »
I was planning to use a co2 pack with mylar bags for the rice, and add 3 O2 absorbers for good measure. Overkill?

I'm not sure what you mean by CO2 pack... flush with CO2 from a welding supply bottle? Dry ice? If using a mylar bag and flushing with CO2 I would't add more than one O2 absorber, and yes, that might be overkill. On the other hand, they are not expensive, and in case of a pinhole or seal failure it might help...

Offline Pathfinder

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Re: Rice Storage
« Reply #4 on: May 04, 2009, 06:00:37 PM »
I'm not sure what you mean by CO2 pack... flush with CO2 from a welding supply bottle? Dry ice? If using a mylar bag and flushing with CO2 I would't add more than one O2 absorber, and yes, that might be overkill. On the other hand, they are not expensive, and in case of a pinhole or seal failure it might help...


I had read about using a pound of dry ice on top of the mylar and bucket, then waiting until the ice had shrunk to about the size of a quarter, then seal the mylar and bucket lid, letting the remaining dry ice add a little pressure to keep everything tight. Adding the O2 absorber is a "just in case" as you said.

Offline mash

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Re: Rice Storage
« Reply #5 on: May 04, 2009, 08:26:23 PM »
this is from the Walton Feed website-

Brown and white rices store very differently. Brown rice is only expected to store for 6 months under average conditions. This is because of the essential fatty acids in brown rice. These oils quickly go rancid as they oxidize. It will store much longer if refrigerated. White rice has the outer shell removed along with those fats. Because of this, white rice isn't nearly as good for you, but will store longer. Hermetically sealed in the absence of oxygen, plan on a storage life for white rice of 8-10 years at a stable temperature of 70 degrees F. It should keep proportionately longer if stored at cooler temperatures. Stored in the absence of oxygen, brown rice will last longer than if it was stored in air. Plan on 1 to 2 years. It is very important to store brown rice as cool as possible, for if you can get the temperature down another ten degrees, it will double the storage life again.

http://waltonfeed.com/old/grain/life.html#rice

There is a mention on one of the LDS sites about rice in #10 cans lasting as long as 30 years according to some research, but I can't seem to find the actual article.

Offline JPH

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Re: Rice Storage
« Reply #6 on: May 05, 2009, 09:35:02 AM »
this is from the Walton Feed website-

Brown and white rices store very differently. Brown rice is only expected to store for 6 months under average conditions. This is because of the essential fatty acids in brown rice. These oils quickly go rancid as they oxidize. It will store much longer if refrigerated. White rice has the outer shell removed along with those fats. Because of this, white rice isn't nearly as good for you, but will store longer. Hermetically sealed in the absence of oxygen, plan on a storage life for white rice of 8-10 years at a stable temperature of 70 degrees F. It should keep proportionately longer if stored at cooler temperatures. Stored in the absence of oxygen, brown rice will last longer than if it was stored in air. Plan on 1 to 2 years. It is very important to store brown rice as cool as possible, for if you can get the temperature down another ten degrees, it will double the storage life again.

http://waltonfeed.com/old/grain/life.html#rice

There is a mention on one of the LDS sites about rice in #10 cans lasting as long as 30 years according to some research, but I can't seem to find the actual article.

You may single-handedly have save my family and myself from one hell of an "O Shit" moment post shtf... I really thought they both stored the same once O2 was removed...

Thank-you,
JPH

Offline mash

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Re: Rice Storage
« Reply #7 on: May 05, 2009, 04:54:54 PM »
You may single-handedly have save my family and myself from one hell of an "O Shit" moment post shtf... I really thought they both stored the same once O2 was removed...

Thank-you,
JPH

No Probs JPH!

I have got so much good advice from this forum, it's good to know I can give back to somebody.