Survivalism & Self Sufficiency Topics > Homesteading and Self Reliant Living

yurt platform/land pics

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surfivor:
snow kit has vertical side supports that look like this on the inside and connect the rafter to the floor directly:

offbeatbassist:
The yurt actually belongs to my brother - donhutch posted earlier on this string mentioning he lived in Penobscot county and was hoping to buy some acreage. They are living in the yurt now. I believe he intends to put in some uprights similar to those in the picture you posted. The lattice in the wall is zip ties - he drilled each tree 10 times and connected each x section with 2 hd zip ties. The wood stove isnt particularly large, but i think they got it for free, so it works for now. I dont know if theyll look for a larger one or not. Those 2 center supports are just wedged into place. I dont think those will remain there. I know he has other improvements on the yurt that he intends to do, but I should let him share it.

surfivor:

--- Quote from: offbeatbassist on October 26, 2012, 02:27:45 PM ---The yurt actually belongs to my brother - donhutch posted earlier on this string mentioning he lived in Penobscot county and was hoping to buy some acreage. They are living in the yurt now. I believe he intends to put in some uprights similar to those in the picture you posted. The lattice in the wall is zip ties - he drilled each tree 10 times and connected each x section with 2 hd zip ties. The wood stove isnt particularly large, but i think they got it for free, so it works for now. I dont know if theyll look for a larger one or not. Those 2 center supports are just wedged into place. I dont think those will remain there. I know he has other improvements on the yurt that he intends to do, but I should let him share it.

--- End quote ---

 my wood stove is even smaller, but I tend to not go up so much when it gets below zero or really cold for long periods ..

 I am really curious how the rafters are connected to the center ring. I didn't see that in the pictures ..

 What kind of wood was used for the rafters and lattice ?

 He should post some pictures of how the stove pipe is supported on the outside ..

 I also wonder how he solved the problem of building the frame just right so that the canvass would fit. The lattice wall height seems variable depending on how the poles might settle and all and the angle and length of the rafters seems also a bit complex. Even though I contracted most of the work, I did study yurt construction from some books and contemplated the challenges involved. Some people who work in construction probably have advantages that I don't. Yurts are interesting in that they are lightweight and much different than a house or cabin and require less wood etc.

 I'd be curious to see how the lattice wall is connected to the bender board at the bottom.


 The other interesting thing about yurts is the portability. A yurt that is say 12 feet in diameter would be about 113 square feet.
Something like that could be set up on some land temporarily for a season and easily moved on small trailer. I could see spending a summer in Alaska, or a winter down south etc. Yurt lattice walls are also very strong and supposedly are not easy for a bear to break into. I wouldn't store food in one, but it might be a little peace of mind for camping out in Alaska say ..






JustGreg:
I think the pics are so helpful, that even sans text/explanation, its practically a 50$ or even 100$ class all by itself.

The only "mistake" I saw was no backsplash next to the tub.  The yurt/gher houses I've been in almost always have a moisture problem.

G.

offbeatbassist:

--- Quote from: surfivor on October 27, 2012, 02:26:41 AM ---
 I am really curious how the rafters are connected to the center ring. I didn't see that in the pictures ..

 What kind of wood was used for the rafters and lattice ?

 He should post some pictures of how the stove pipe is supported on the outside ..

 I also wonder how he solved the problem of building the frame just right so that the canvass would fit. The lattice wall height seems variable depending on how the poles might settle and all and the angle and length of the rafters seems also a bit complex. Even though I contracted most of the work, I did study yurt construction from some books and contemplated the challenges involved. Some people who work in construction probably have advantages that I don't. Yurts are interesting in that they are lightweight and much different than a house or cabin and require less wood etc.

 I'd be curious to see how the lattice wall is connected to the bender board at the bottom.


 The other interesting thing about yurts is the portability. A yurt that is say 12 feet in diameter would be about 113 square feet.
Something like that could be set up on some land temporarily for a season and easily moved on small trailer. I could see spending a summer in Alaska, or a winter down south etc. Yurt lattice walls are also very strong and supposedly are not easy for a bear to break into. I wouldn't store food in one, but it might be a little peace of mind for camping out in Alaska say ..

--- End quote ---

The rafters we shaved down with a draw knife to fit holes he drilled into the dome support ring. Unfortunately, he drilled them by sight so the angles were all off. As we were putting the rafters in, the ring was pivotting, and because we were trying to keep the ring level, the ring was starting to get stressed. After putting it up for the 3rd time ( we had it resting on a 12' ladder until we had enough rafters up (it actually lifted it off the ladder as we put in more rafters). Finally we realized the holes were cut off angle and once we allowed the ring to pivot slightly it all went up pretty quick and easy. We also had the ends cut to form a 'u' to sit on the cord, but in between tries in getting the dome ring in place, we had to trim the length slightly and adjust the 'u' so that one side angled out at 45 degrees, allowing us to slide the rafters down onto the cord with the weight of the rafter and ring keeping it from popping up off the cord.

   Im not sure specifically of what type of wood he was using for the lattice and rafters. He picked them all off his land, I know that much. I know there were several types especially in the rafters. I think there were small maples and birch. The rafters were about 3" at the base, and the lattice was 1" I think. The lattice initially wasnt connected to the base or bender board at all, but he ended up attaching some blocks to the floor and screwing the lattice in place because the base of the lattice was creeping in a little bit.

   I dont recall what he did with the stove pipe, but I do know he upgraded his stove mid-winter. It was too small and had an air-tight (?) stove given to him. It was a bit bigger and more efficient. Ill mention to him about getting some pictures up of those things specifically. They didn't have electricity run out so they have to run into town for internet.

   As for the portability, I dont think his is very portable. Even if it were capable of being moved, I dont think he would want to. As for how he got the size right, we were doing math the entire time of building it, not to mention the 6 months of planning he put on paper and building the lattice before he started actually building.

What I have determined is that I have too much stuff to live in a yurt. At least the more traditional sizes - 16', 20', 24'... We are apartment hunting right now and 800 sq ft is too small (which I think is about the size of his, but I could be mistaken- 24' yurt?). If I were to get/build a yurt I would either contract it out or just get a kit.

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