Author Topic: Buying a Truck... any advice?  (Read 22115 times)

Offline NWPilgrim

  • Dedicated Contributor
  • ******
  • Posts: 1605
  • Karma: 114
  • New TSP Forum member
Re: Buying a Truck... any advice?
« Reply #30 on: July 15, 2014, 11:20:27 AM »
I am back looking for a used truck right now. Looking for something like a F250 or F350 crew cab 1995-2003 which ranges from $6,000 - $14,000.  My budget for truck plus any needed repairs, tires, etc. is $15,000 cash.

Questions for the collective brain :)

1) For an older truck like this does diesel make sense for its longevity, since the diesel over gas price premium is negligible for this age truck. I don't need diesel for my use but wondering if the durable engine would be better for vehicles already with 160K - 220K miles.

2) What do you think of the age versus price trade-off of 1995 truck with 160K miles for $7,000 versus a 2003 truck with 120K miles for $14,000?  My concern is that some things like rubber parts/seal break down with age regardless of miles. I am leaning toward the older $7K truck and then have plenty left over for repairs if needed.

Offline Zef_66

  • Survivalist Mentor
  • *****
  • Posts: 562
  • Karma: 23
Re: Buying a Truck... any advice?
« Reply #31 on: July 15, 2014, 12:23:15 PM »
I am back looking for a used truck right now. Looking for something like a F250 or F350 crew cab 1995-2003 which ranges from $6,000 - $14,000.  My budget for truck plus any needed repairs, tires, etc. is $15,000 cash.

Questions for the collective brain :)

1) For an older truck like this does diesel make sense for its longevity, since the diesel over gas price premium is negligible for this age truck. I don't need diesel for my use but wondering if the durable engine would be better for vehicles already with 160K - 220K miles.

2) What do you think of the age versus price trade-off of 1995 truck with 160K miles for $7,000 versus a 2003 truck with 120K miles for $14,000?  My concern is that some things like rubber parts/seal break down with age regardless of miles. I am leaning toward the older $7K truck and then have plenty left over for repairs if needed.

I'm not sure what trucks you are looking at (maybe it is area dependent), but around here the gas/diesel price difference is just as large, or even larger in used trucks. I know because I just bought a gas truck. Here is a perfect example:

My truck:
~2004 Chevy 2500 Crew Cab Avalanche
~8.1L V8 Gas engine
~Almost all options (leather, CD, moonroof, 4WD, towing, etc)
~72,000 miles
~Paid: $11,000

My Brother-in-law's truck:
~2005 Ford F-250 Crew Cab Lariat
~6.0L V8 Powerstroke Diesel engine
~Almost all options except moonroof
~106,000 miles
~Paid: $18,000

Now, I got a good deal on mine since it was private party. On a dealer lot, it would go for $13k or so. Still, from everything I looked at, there was still a $5k price difference between gas and diesel on comparable year/mileage trucks.

I do think that diesels will last longer, but I am not convinced that there is a payoff anywhere. Maybe in fuel savings while towing. But most of the time, the people that own diesels don't tow often enough to make owning them worthwhile. Much like my BIL, they are more interested in owning a diesel so they can hear the turbo and watch the black smoke. If you regularly tow 8,000-12,000 lbs or more, then you need a diesel. Anything under that, and a gas engine will suffice. Or go like I did and look for a larger cubic inch gas engine.

When comparing older to newer vehicles, I wanted a truck with no more than 150k miles. That was my cutoff. And I was striving for one less than 100k miles because that is usually a point where stuff starts going wrong, IMO. And my budget was $15k as well. So I went for the newer truck that needed a few repairs, but overall was in much better condition and would last me 20 years. Where an older truck would only last me about 10 years. IMO, the more time I have to buy a vehicle, the more money I spend. The longer I can drive a vehicle, even if I have to pay a little more, is all the better for me and my wallet.

nelson96

  • Guest
Re: Buying a Truck... any advice?
« Reply #32 on: July 15, 2014, 05:23:00 PM »
I am back looking for a used truck right now. Looking for something like a F250 or F350 crew cab 1995-2003 which ranges from $6,000 - $14,000.  My budget for truck plus any needed repairs, tires, etc. is $15,000 cash.

Questions for the collective brain :)

1) For an older truck like this does diesel make sense for its longevity, since the diesel over gas price premium is negligible for this age truck. I don't need diesel for my use but wondering if the durable engine would be better for vehicles already with 160K - 220K miles.

Keep in mind that a diesel engine by mile 250,000 could need some service, which can be pretty spendy.  Some models have ridiculous costs on replacing injectors for example.  Buying used is good in some ways (depreciation) but it's always buyer beware since you don't know how it was taken care of.

I agree with Zef in that diesel doesn't offer a pay-off unless you are frequently hauling a lot of weight.  If that's you, they're the only way to go.

nelson96

  • Guest
Re: Buying a Truck... any advice?
« Reply #33 on: July 15, 2014, 05:28:49 PM »
Chevy vs. Ford . . .  Too funny, especially since I like Dodge.   8)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UfHtcUZXljw&app=desktop

.

Offline NWPilgrim

  • Dedicated Contributor
  • ******
  • Posts: 1605
  • Karma: 114
  • New TSP Forum member
Re: Buying a Truck... any advice?
« Reply #34 on: July 16, 2014, 02:38:21 AM »
Thanks guys, good input.  I will have to look around more at gas engine truck prices.  From an initial scan I was finding maybe $2,000 difference for the same year and trim, although the diesels seem to have many more miles on them, typically around 200K - 250K while the gas motor trucks will have more like 125K -160K miles.

After talking with my motor head son-in-law I am now leaning more toward the 2000 year range.  Are all the brands pretty much equivalent in say the 1995 - 2005 period in terms of frame construction and gasoline motor reliability/power?  Did any brands or models have particularly bad years then?  Seems like trucks went through a unibody phase for a few years and then back to ladder frame.   Are they all strong frames?  What are the best proven motors during this period? I have no allegiance to any brand.

Offline riverbend_rich

  • Senior Survivalist
  • ****
  • Posts: 245
  • Karma: 6
  • Garden, Hunt, DIY (MSB)
    • Ada Music Center (music store, band instrument repair)
Re: Buying a Truck... any advice?
« Reply #35 on: July 16, 2014, 07:47:02 PM »
My 3 suburbans that I have put between 229k and 275k on with no major power train problems count as a strong vote in the gm camp. But I am not a ford or dodge hater... I have just used more Chevys and they seem to be the cheapest on parts

Offline NWPilgrim

  • Dedicated Contributor
  • ******
  • Posts: 1605
  • Karma: 114
  • New TSP Forum member
Re: Buying a Truck... any advice?
« Reply #36 on: July 24, 2014, 03:40:08 PM »
As a follow-up to my earlier questions, I wanted to let you all know I did buy a used truck.  New trucks are insanely expensive.  I looked at dealers and Craigslist and ended up buying from a CL posting.

First, what I did buy is a Dodge 2500 5.9L Cummins long box 4x4 with 185K miles for $18,000.  Well used but cared for and great running shape, just a few trim items need repair.

Some of my observations about the market and the process:

* Private party sales are a few thousand under the dealer, but you have to have a fistful of cash ready to go and transport and hand it over.  From photos and talking with the seller I learned he is a trades professional, and has a nice house and the deal would be at his house so it seemed safe enough to carry that much cash.

* Had to go to two branches of our credit union to withdraw $18,000 in cash and they gave me all $100 and $50 bills, quite a stack.  Best to do the withdrawal ahead of time to make sure there are no delays when you see a good deal.

* Good deals are snapped up quickly, so watch a few times a day, especially late at night and 8am or so in the morning.  I noticed Sunday night the seller dropped his price $2,000 and called him 9am on Monday and arranged to view the truck.  Three other guys called after I did and were put on the seller's waiting list.  I missed another blazing good deal earlier by a few days.  I had it on my list but was doing more research.  By the time I whittled my list down and realized this other truck was #1 candidate it was already sold.  Some guys are good about removing listings immediately upon the sale and some take a few days to remove it.

* The fewer "must haves" you put on the deal the fewer matches you will find.  I was pretty open to brands and gas versus diesel but relied on experienced input from my motorhead son-in-law.  My must haves were: rear seat space enough for car seats and power door locks for the grandkids, 3/4 ton minimum, and eventually settled on 2000-2007 years.  Then I restricted to either Chevy Duramax or Dodge Cummins for diesel, or Ford 5.4L for gas (after driving some other gas options).  That really narrowed the field, but within a week of intense searching was able to find 3 good prospects.

* I'll make good use of the size of the truck but the diesel is about a $3,000 concession to novelty for me.  I like the idea of an alternate fueled vehicle, especially with longer term storage potential than gasoline, and even conversion to biodiesel some day.  The upside of diesel is that the 5.9L in the 2003-2007 Rams is known for good mileage.  The seller reportedly got 17-22mpg city/hwy.  Just around the burbs I am easily getting 16.5 mpg according to the electronic monitor. On the freeway it hardly runs above idle, about 1,600 rpm so I can believe it will get at least 20mpg for this heavy duty truck.

* My SIL advised getting a "grandpa" truck: single owner, cared for, typical of older folks.  Turns out that is exactly what I bought!  The seller is a grandpa like myself: original owner, regular oil change and maintenance, average miles for the year (but lower than normal for diesel trucks).  I looked over several other trucks and most of them were not well cared for, heavy use, high miles and rough interiors. Pristine examples were higher priced.  What I bought was a daily use work  truck so it could not demand a premium for mint condition, but well cared for so it was not trashed.

Can't wait for the weekend so I can dig into some projects to haul away some brush and debris.  Later on will be hauling lots of bricks for some garden walls/planters and soil for backfill!

nelson96

  • Guest
Re: Buying a Truck... any advice?
« Reply #37 on: July 24, 2014, 10:11:51 PM »
First, what I did buy is a Dodge 2500 5.9L Cummins long box 4x4 with 185K miles for $18,000.  Well used but cared for and great running shape, just a few trim items need repair

Congratulations, you're going to love it.  What year is it, mine is a 2006 and I think it has 63,000 (or around there) on it now.

Offline NWPilgrim

  • Dedicated Contributor
  • ******
  • Posts: 1605
  • Karma: 114
  • New TSP Forum member
Re: Buying a Truck... any advice?
« Reply #38 on: July 24, 2014, 10:35:22 PM »
2004

Thanks, it is perfect for what I want.  Used enough I won't hesitate to load it up with remodel debris, gravel or pallet of bricks, yet good enough shape I can take the grandkids to Idaho family reunion in the forest camps with confidence.  Planning a wood cutting party with a couple of friends for a charity thing, too.

Really impressed with the diesel engine. Seems to be a huge amount of torque for the engine size. Now I'm trying to develop the start/shut down procedure into a habit. 

Any one decide to disconnect the EGR (?) device that recycles exhaust to the intake?  My understanding is that it runs fine without it and may increase performance and mileage.  I wonder how much it affects pollution since sending exhaust back into the intake does not seem like a good idea.  From what little I have read it seems to cause reliability problems when allowed to idle for periods of times or in congested stop and go traffic.  Is this an EPA stupid idea or is it effective and best left alone?

nelson96

  • Guest
Re: Buying a Truck... any advice?
« Reply #39 on: July 24, 2014, 10:45:43 PM »
Any one decide to disconnect the EGR (?) device that recycles exhaust to the intake?  My understanding is that it runs fine without it and may increase performance and mileage.  I wonder how much it affects pollution since sending exhaust back into the intake does not seem like a good idea.  From what little I have read it seems to cause reliability problems when allowed to idle for periods of times or in congested stop and go traffic.  Is this an EPA stupid idea or is it effective and best left alone?

All I can say is that mine is straight stock with no mods and I have not had a single issue.  I've idled mine for over an hour multiple times, charging batteries.

Offline NWPilgrim

  • Dedicated Contributor
  • ******
  • Posts: 1605
  • Karma: 114
  • New TSP Forum member
Re: Buying a Truck... any advice?
« Reply #40 on: July 25, 2014, 02:28:41 AM »
Nelson, I searched a bit and found that the EGR in 2004-2007 5.9L engines is accomplished not with exhaust manifold to intake manifold and EGR valve, but by the camshaft timing of the intake valves (I guess they open early and get some of the exhaust gases before they are fully purged). Therefore there is no soot build up as in the external manifold routing systems.  In the 2007 6.7L diesel they started routing through the manifolds and the EGR valve controlled electronically and vacuum.

Thanks for confirming that idling for long periods is not a problem for your 2006, as I thought that would be one of the side benefits of diesel is lots of inverter power.  Two big batteries already built into the truck!  According to the manual, idling for long periods should be avoided in very cold weather since incomplete combustion may occur and carbon and varnish can form on piston rings and injector nozzles.  Apparently there is no issue with idling these engines as long as the temperature is not frigid cold.

What about injectors?  I've read that they may need to replaced around 150K miles.  Mine have not as yet. Is that true in general,  or only if not operated properly, such as the above instructions about cold weather idling?


nelson96

  • Guest
Re: Buying a Truck... any advice?
« Reply #41 on: July 25, 2014, 09:30:03 AM »
Thanks for confirming that idling for long periods is not a problem for your 2006, as I thought that would be one of the side benefits of diesel is lots of inverter power.  Two big batteries already built into the truck!  According to the manual, idling for long periods should be avoided in very cold weather since incomplete combustion may occur and carbon and varnish can form on piston rings and injector nozzles.  Apparently there is no issue with idling these engines as long as the temperature is not frigid cold.

What about injectors?  I've read that they may need to replaced around 150K miles.  Mine have not as yet. Is that true in general,  or only if not operated properly, such as the above instructions about cold weather idling?

I talked to my brother (my mechanic) about this.  He confirmed that it's not good for ANY engine to idle a lot and for long periods of time.  He added that if you do idle for long periods of time it can typically get negated by working the engine hard after, as long as it's not a common thing to idle for long periods of time.  He also mentioned that it's much worse for these engines to make a lot of short city drives where the engine never really gets a chance to heat up.

Injectors:  He said that idling would make a substantial difference in injector life or performance.  He said that he would expect a set of injectors to last at least 200,00 miles but typically see's them last the life of the engine depending how it is used and maintained.

nelson96

  • Guest
Re: Buying a Truck... any advice?
« Reply #42 on: July 25, 2014, 10:29:13 AM »
@ NWPilgrim
He also told me that you and I benefit from having injectors cost a fraction of what they do for other manufacturers.

Offline NWPilgrim

  • Dedicated Contributor
  • ******
  • Posts: 1605
  • Karma: 114
  • New TSP Forum member
Re: Buying a Truck... any advice?
« Reply #43 on: August 01, 2014, 02:59:06 AM »
Had my Dodge 2500 looked over at the dealer and a few things fixed.

- Rear door power locks and window not working:  Wiring harness worn, and had it replaced rather than have them try to repair it.  At 10 yrs old I figure if one wire is bad now some others could go bad soon, too.  My daughter just had this done to her 2002 Jeep driver door.  I wonder if this is a Chrysler specific poor design or what?  Our 2003 Honda wiring harnesses seem to go through more straight and are not flexed much with the door opening and closing.  The 2004 Dodge Ram and 2002 Jeep both seem to bend the wiring harness quite a bit when closing the door.

- Had the oil changed and chassis lubed, and also had them change out the oil, air and transmission filters as I had no idea when they were done and the air filter was looking well used. Also did a coolant flush as again I did not know if it had been done at 150,000 or not.  Will probably have all other fluids flushed and refreshed over the next year as well.

- Auto transmission shifter not going into Park was just a slack cable that needed adjusting.  I am wondering if some time in the future if it is feasible to convert an automatic transmission to a manual transmission?  If it ever fails I would rather replace it with a bullet-proof manual unit than have the auto rebuilt.

At home I cleaned the battery terminals, and replaced the hood lift struts since the hood kept wanting to slip down on my head.  And I installed a crossover tool box.  I am thinking of adding a 1500W inverter.  I currently have a 800W inverter that I figured would work well on our Honda Accord with a single battery and car size alternator (95A?).  Now with the 2 big batteries of 850A with a 135A alternator it could probably handle a 1500W inverter for 30-60 minutes.  The 800w is plenty for recharging cordless tools, phones, radios, LEDs, and running small appliances.  The 1500W would allow me to run some corded tools and a small compressor.

Overall the truck is running like a top and is sturdy as all get out.  Loading up the first load of stuff tomorrow to go to the landfill, then Goodwill, then landscape recycle and finally to storage.  That 35 gal fuel tank is no fun to fill up though! $97 on my first fill up.  Trying to remember to fill at 2/3 full so it is not so much of a hit to the wallet at one time. :)  Loving that diesel motor.

Offline mountainmoma

  • Survival Demonstrator
  • *******
  • Posts: 4728
  • Karma: 223
  • suburban homesteader
Re: Buying a Truck... any advice?
« Reply #44 on: August 01, 2014, 06:42:17 AM »
We just had our truck die, my daughter drove it without looking at the temp gauge, it was a '94 Ford ranger XLT. I realy like these for a small truck, and easy for me to drive, drawbacks were only 8 bales at a time could be hauled up the mountain and we had found a great deal on a small trailer 2 years ago, but it was too big for the ranger to haul up the grade to get here, so had to pass it on.

not having any budget to replace, and needing a truck to get hay and take goats to the fair, we were in a bind. Was contemplating a small loan. But, an aquaintance up here told me about a client of theirs, who I also know casually, who was planning on getting rid of his old truck. It is a Ford F150, 1995. Maybe 170k miles. Orange, mismatched dark shell, tow package. Downsides are that it will get worse gas mileage, it is SO BIG, I am not used to the size when I test drove and was too much on the center line, it is not an extended cab (the ranger was). Good point is price, he just paid $500 in brake stuff last month, so wants $1000. So, looks like we will be getting a beat up Ford F150, real happy about the shell (goat transport for fair or fire evacuation), tow package. The truck was the guys brothers truck since new, and when he bought a new truck a couple years ago, sold or gave it to him. The only other thing he knows is wrong with it, since he took care of the brakes, are that he says if you dont run it once a week the battery will die, and he thinks it is not the battery but something that is using the electric. We, like current owner, do not use a truck often. I might use twice a month, unless we need to evacuate

Offline Zef_66

  • Survivalist Mentor
  • *****
  • Posts: 562
  • Karma: 23
Re: Buying a Truck... any advice?
« Reply #45 on: August 01, 2014, 10:22:29 AM »
he says if you dont run it once a week the battery will die, and he thinks it is not the battery but something that is using the electric. We, like current owner, do not use a truck often. I might use twice a month, unless we need to evacuate

My last truck had the same issue. Instead of spending a lot of time and money tracking it down (even though I did try a couple times), I choose to install a battery disconnect switch like this:

http://amzn.to/1u78UcH

I too would only use the truck once or twice a month and would just pop the hood and disconnect the battery when I wasn't going to use it.

Offline mountainmoma

  • Survival Demonstrator
  • *******
  • Posts: 4728
  • Karma: 223
  • suburban homesteader
Re: Buying a Truck... any advice?
« Reply #46 on: August 01, 2014, 10:49:46 AM »
My last truck had the same issue. Instead of spending a lot of time and money tracking it down (even though I did try a couple times), I choose to install a battery disconnect switch like this:

http://amzn.to/1u78UcH

I too would only use the truck once or twice a month and would just pop the hood and disconnect the battery when I wasn't going to use it.

+1
thanks !! I didnt know such a thing existed, and so inexpensive too

nelson96

  • Guest
Re: Buying a Truck... any advice?
« Reply #47 on: August 01, 2014, 11:05:16 AM »
I prefer something similar to this or this, becuase it can be mounted externally and has a visible on or off.  I use tem on my R.V.'s.

Offline mountainmoma

  • Survival Demonstrator
  • *******
  • Posts: 4728
  • Karma: 223
  • suburban homesteader
Re: Buying a Truck... any advice?
« Reply #48 on: August 01, 2014, 02:12:52 PM »
I never knew it was common to disconnect batteries. The ranger was only driven a few times a month, and once we broke off the cabin ceiling light fixture, we never had to worry about the battery ( well, except once my daughter left the ignition key in the on position with the stereo on super low volume...)

ANything else I should be aware of with a ford F150 or in general full sized truck ?

Offline NWPilgrim

  • Dedicated Contributor
  • ******
  • Posts: 1605
  • Karma: 114
  • New TSP Forum member
Re: Buying a Truck... any advice?
« Reply #49 on: August 01, 2014, 02:29:34 PM »
But, an aquaintance up here told me about a client of theirs, who I also know casually, who was planning on getting rid of his old truck. It is a Ford F150, 1995. Maybe 170k miles. Orange, mismatched dark shell, tow package. Downsides are that it will get worse gas mileage, it is SO BIG, I am not used to the size when I test drove and was too much on the center line, it is not an extended cab (the ranger was). Good point is price, he just paid $500 in brake stuff last month, so wants $1000. So, looks like we will be getting a beat up Ford F150, real happy about the shell (goat transport for fair or fire evacuation), tow package. The truck was the guys brothers truck since new, and when he bought a new truck a couple years ago, sold or gave it to him. The only other thing he knows is wrong with it, since he took care of the brakes, are that he says if you dont run it once a week the battery will die, and he thinks it is not the battery but something that is using the electric. We, like current owner, do not use a truck often. I might use twice a month, unless we need to evacuate

That is a great deal.  Pretty low miles for 19 years old.  My 1995 Aerostar was still going well after almost 200K miles.  I had a lot of the front end suspension and sterring replaced at 125K but that is because that model was so front end heavy for the light unibody frame and components.  The F150 should be much better than that.  I would mainly be keeping an eye on the belts and hoses and anything else rubber/plastic.  They will age and become brittle with time not just heat and miles.  Most of my repairs after the frontend work were just trying to keep the interior functional (seat belts, driver seat frame broke, etc).  the engine was not very powerful but lasted very well with hardly anything done to it.  Regular oil changes and lube every 3,500 miles.  I think your F150 will be great with just minor items now and then.

Offline Smurf Hunter

  • Survival Veteran
  • ********
  • Posts: 7172
  • Karma: 334
Re: Buying a Truck... any advice?
« Reply #50 on: August 01, 2014, 02:35:38 PM »
I never knew it was common to disconnect batteries. The ranger was only driven a few times a month, and once we broke off the cabin ceiling light fixture, we never had to worry about the battery ( well, except once my daughter left the ignition key in the on position with the stereo on super low volume...)

ANything else I should be aware of with a ford F150 or in general full sized truck ?

Don't take this comment badly, but for the modest price you are paying I think it's prudent to treat your F-150 as a semi-temporary solution.  A set of premium tires and a major service would cost more than you paid for the vehicle.  That said, if you could confidently spend < $500 and knowingly extend the useful life of the vehicle by a year or more, I would do it.

Just be careful not to spend good money on partial solutions.  Tires and brakes are examples of where you don't want to go cheap, and get immediate value from replacement. 

Offline mountainmoma

  • Survival Demonstrator
  • *******
  • Posts: 4728
  • Karma: 223
  • suburban homesteader
Re: Buying a Truck... any advice?
« Reply #51 on: August 01, 2014, 03:40:14 PM »
Don't take this comment badly, but for the modest price you are paying I think it's prudent to treat your F-150 as a semi-temporary solution.  A set of premium tires and a major service would cost more than you paid for the vehicle.  That said, if you could confidently spend < $500 and knowingly extend the useful life of the vehicle by a year or more, I would do it.

Just be careful not to spend good money on partial solutions.  Tires and brakes are examples of where you don't want to go cheap, and get immediate value from replacement.

Totally agree on the tires and brakes. The ranger was also very cheap when we bought it 3 or4 years ago, cant remember, maybe 1200 and needed all 4 new tires and brakes, and I knew that going in. Wish we had $8k, but, we dont. The tires on the ranger are still fantastic as we dont drive it too much, nice Michelins. We expect to do modest repairs on the used vehicles, as long as they have good basic underlying value going on in line with what is needed.

There is a fairly good chance that the ranger will be bought back from the state as it coincidentally had failed smog  right before it broke, so financially, this will potentially be an even trade and no cash out of pocket, from my end. This is why it especially does not make sense to fix this major repair on the Ranger. It is fixable, but fixing the blown head gasket etc... in conjunction with a smog required repair, when they will buy it to take it off the road, as much as we like it, we need to just get rid of it. The Ford will at least buy us some time, hopefully a few years.

Offline mountainmoma

  • Survival Demonstrator
  • *******
  • Posts: 4728
  • Karma: 223
  • suburban homesteader
Re: Buying a Truck... any advice?
« Reply #52 on: March 10, 2017, 08:59:50 PM »
The old ford F150 (straight 6 engine) has been running strong, but is not a drive alot truck, so I am considering upgrading. Someone we know is getting rid of their Dodge 1500, a 2001, lowish mileage. It is a 5.something V8 engine, so it should also be better at hauling the small travel trailer we bought last year and have never used. Downside is that the truck bed is shorter, it is 6.4 ft., but it has a quad cab, so it is real nice to have room there too.

So, I wonder if we would end up unhappy with a shorter bed length. I do know we have been unhappy in the current beat up truck because it only has 2 bucket seats, (and an old desk chair stuck inbetween them as an unsafe 3rd seat). It seems possible to have a full sized bed truck with an extended cab, but much rarer.

So, pluses, we know the history of the potential replacement truck, it has a shell on it (needed for goat transport), it has a lumber rack on it too, miles are low, it has comfortable seating for up to 6. Cons, bed is only 6'4", and not 8', my eldest dd has been frustrated a few times with limited room in her husbands Toyota truck, I forget which model, so I had her go outside and measure the bed length, the bed length on it is only 5' and she thinks it is likely narrower too. That puts this truck we are looking at in between what we have now and the known to small size

Offline Carl

  • Mr HamTastic!
  • Forum Veteran
  • *********
  • Posts: 13105
  • Karma: 716
  • COW?...No ,I haven't seen your cow.
Re: Buying a Truck... any advice?
« Reply #53 on: March 11, 2017, 06:32:27 AM »
The old ford F150 (straight 6 engine) has been running strong, but is not a drive alot truck, so I am considering upgrading. Someone we know is getting rid of their Dodge 1500, a 2001, lowish mileage. It is a 5.something V8 engine, so it should also be better at hauling the small travel trailer we bought last year and have never used. Downside is that the truck bed is shorter, it is 6.4 ft., but it has a quad cab, so it is real nice to have room there too.

So, I wonder if we would end up unhappy with a shorter bed length. I do know we have been unhappy in the current beat up truck because it only has 2 bucket seats, (and an old desk chair stuck inbetween them as an unsafe 3rd seat). It seems possible to have a full sized bed truck with an extended cab, but much rarer.

So, pluses, we know the history of the potential replacement truck, it has a shell on it (needed for goat transport), it has a lumber rack on it too, miles are low, it has comfortable seating for up to 6. Cons, bed is only 6'4", and not 8', my eldest dd has been frustrated a few times with limited room in her husbands Toyota truck, I forget which model, so I had her go outside and measure the bed length, the bed length on it is only 5' and she thinks it is likely narrower too. That puts this truck we are looking at in between what we have now and the known to small size

I would think the larger engine with more people space and short bed will be a good choice and a small trailer if you need to haul a tractor or a disabled vehicle etc...used trailors are not too costly and tend to maintain value.