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Butter shortages...in France..yes butter..

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chad:
http://www.businessinsider.com/butter-shortage-in-france-2017-10

It's easy too stack 5 or 10 pounds of butter in the back of the fridge...I do, and you should too.

David in MN...how long dose store bought butter last in the fridge?

My guess is a long long time.

David in MN:
Call me out, will ya? Just cause I'm from Wisconsin and worked in the food industry?

For long term, buy salted butter. I had a rep from Cargill explain the salt is there for preservation and unsalted takes on "fridge flavors". So you'll have to ignore the fancy baking books. I do anyway, more salt always tastes better, just ignore the later salt addition.

My butter (from Costco) says it will go in February. Bullsh*t. I could leave a stick on the counter until then. I've never refrigerated butter for use unless in the height of summer. But the manufacturer is writing the code for people who live in Louisiana and Florida where it rains in the fridge. If you're in a moderate climate you'll be fine way past the date and you will know if it's bad (rancidity is obvious).

Butter is my preferred oil. It works magic with cast iron (almost all my stovetop) and contrary to belief is common with many Italian dishes. The northern part can't grow olives, after all. Unless I'm making Sicilian, Greek, or other Mediterranean I generally use butter and I keep 2-7 lbs in the back of the fridge where it's coldest. But all my use is room temp. I use 2 sticks every week.

My recommendation: Buy bulk from Costco (or other bulk), store it in the back of the fridge because it can't freeze there, and pull out and use at room temp to cook with. The butter crock was a perfect invention. If I'm entertaining, I have a warming spot on my stove and will have half a pound melted for adding late to dishes like risotto or to pan for stuffed pasta. Having access to butter at room temperature or already melted is kinda chef 101.

Morning Sunshine:
David - you say not to freeze?  I keep a whole box of Costco butter in the freezer.  When I say a box, that is 6 packages of 4 1-pound boxes.  We go through about 3 pounds a week in my family of 7.
We keep 2 cubes out on the counter, and rotate the bowl it is in.

David in MN:

--- Quote from: Morning Sunshine on November 02, 2017, 08:52:33 PM ---David - you say not to freeze?  I keep a whole box of Costco butter in the freezer.  When I say a box, that is 6 packages of 4 1-pound boxes.  We go through about 3 pounds a week in my family of 7.
We keep 2 cubes out on the counter, and rotate the bowl it is in.

--- End quote ---

I guess you could freeze it...

Butter, if you look at its history, is our best attempt at shelf stable fat. Along with its cousin lard (which you don't freeze) we have our big two long term fats.

Freezing won't hurt. Other than the slight amount of water will crystallize. But that only means your frozen butter might look "melty" quicker. Not a safety concern.

Saturated fat is very stable. Add salt and whoa... even more. Your ancestors made butter, lard, suet, etc. because they could last in the cellar.

I highly doubt any of us has pushed butter to its bitter end. How many days would it take?

I keep a mug of rendered bacon fat at the cabin. From September to May nobody touches it. Yet come May I use it. It's salted and saturated.

I don't think freezing is bad, but I go way beyond "shelf life" when the fats are stable. My advice, goof off. You'll know when it's bad.

Smurf Hunter:
haha.  I ran to Costco during my lunch hour (worked from home today) and bought Kirkland butter and through it in the garage freezer. 
Been doing this for a while, no issues that I can tell, but I'm not a chef.

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