Farm, Garden and The Land > Permaculture, Land Management and Foraging

Wild Mushrooms

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Ultio1:
Great topic.
I dont hunt mushrooms because I am not that educated in Identifying them and because I live in the desert. ;)
I do have a great interest in them however. It all started with ants believe it or not but thats another story. I have been learning to grow my own mushrooms for about 2 years now. I highly recommend it to anyone wanting to add a nearly endless food supply. I have grown 5 kinds of mushrooms and all were realitivly easy. It is a journey however and when you start looking online for info the top results a lot of times will be about "magic mushrooms" but the principal is the same so you can learn from those type of forums and videos to. There are quite a few youtube videos that show teach you how to grow mushrooms many different ways. You will need a place to do it, a room or shed or something. I have tried just about every shortcut I could imagine and the results were always failure. However as soon as I just gave in and listened the experts I was successful every time. You can grow HUNDREDS of pounds of mushrooms a month in an area the size of a decent raised bed garden. These things can grow on cardboard, paper, grain and even straight out of logs. You can grow them on trash. It is a bit of a challenge at first but If you have had one week of chemistry or biology in high school you can do this. I will probably do a DIY or series of DIYs when I get settled in at my new place and get a shed setup to grow them in. You have to control temperature and humidity.  Its a make it or break it kind of thing and how much success you  have will be related to how well you do it. ( Unless you live in Oregon or Washington state, somewhere already perfectly suited for it)

Please watch this video if you have the time. Its not to long and it contains some amazing info on mushrooms.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XI5frPV58tY

DeltaEchoVictor:

--- Quote from: Ultio1 on January 08, 2009, 10:33:32 AM ---Great topic.
I dont hunt mushrooms because I am not that educated in Identifying them and because I live in the desert. ;)
I do have a great interest in them however. It all started with ants believe it or not but thats another story. I have been learning to grow my own mushrooms for about 2 years now. I highly recommend it to anyone wanting to add a nearly endless food supply. I have grown 5 kinds of mushrooms and all were realitivly easy. It is a journey however and when you start looking online for info the top results a lot of times will be about "magic mushrooms" but the principal is the same so you can learn from those type of forums and videos to. There are quite a few youtube videos that show teach you how to grow mushrooms many different ways. You will need a place to do it, a room or shed or something. I have tried just about every shortcut I could imagine and the results were always failure. However as soon as I just gave in and listened the experts I was successful every time. You can grow HUNDREDS of pounds of mushrooms a month in an area the size of a decent raised bed garden. These things can grow on cardboard, paper, grain and even straight out of logs. You can grow them on trash. It is a bit of a challenge at first but If you have had one week of chemistry or biology in high school you can do this. I will probably do a DIY or series of DIYs when I get settled in at my new place and get a shed setup to grow them in. You have to control temperature and humidity.  Its a make it or break it kind of thing and how much success you  have will be related to how well you do it. ( Unless you live in Oregon or Washington state, somewhere already perfectly suited for it)

Please watch this video if you have the time. Its not to long and it contains some amazing info on mushrooms.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XI5frPV58tY


--- End quote ---
Thanks for the link U.

When you get your set up running take us thru it.  I'll be looking forward to it. 

Have you considered doing this for extra cash?  I've read that restaurants will pay for specialty mushrooms, shitake, mitake, etc.

T Kehl:

--- Quote from: sludgy_nixer on January 04, 2009, 07:18:45 PM ---i just set up a photobucket account so forgive my lateness

here's a few i found last april at my dads place in western missouri. 2 weeks after i found these my dad called
and said had filled up 3 5gal buckets and there were still tons out there. said it's the most abundant morel season he's
seen in his 40 years of hunting.





not to be confused with the beefsteak, which can really mess you up. some people eat them...but others have not been so lucky.







--- End quote ---

Very nice morels!

FYI, I have found that morel's are freezable.  We clean them and put them on a sheet until frozen.  Once frozen they can be placed in bags, but they are fragile.

Maybe it's just the joy of fried morel's in mid-winter, but they taste nearly or just as good as fresh.

Ultio1:

--- Quote from: DeltaEchoVictor on January 08, 2009, 07:27:42 PM ---
--- Quote from: Ultio1 on January 08, 2009, 10:33:32 AM ---Great topic.
I dont hunt mushrooms because I am not that educated in Identifying them and because I live in the desert. ;)
I do have a great interest in them however. It all started with ants believe it or not but thats another story. I have been learning to grow my own mushrooms for about 2 years now. I highly recommend it to anyone wanting to add a nearly endless food supply. I have grown 5 kinds of mushrooms and all were realitivly easy. It is a journey however and when you start looking online for info the top results a lot of times will be about "magic mushrooms" but the principal is the same so you can learn from those type of forums and videos to. There are quite a few youtube videos that show teach you how to grow mushrooms many different ways. You will need a place to do it, a room or shed or something. I have tried just about every shortcut I could imagine and the results were always failure. However as soon as I just gave in and listened the experts I was successful every time. You can grow HUNDREDS of pounds of mushrooms a month in an area the size of a decent raised bed garden. These things can grow on cardboard, paper, grain and even straight out of logs. You can grow them on trash. It is a bit of a challenge at first but If you have had one week of chemistry or biology in high school you can do this. I will probably do a DIY or series of DIYs when I get settled in at my new place and get a shed setup to grow them in. You have to control temperature and humidity.  Its a make it or break it kind of thing and how much success you  have will be related to how well you do it. ( Unless you live in Oregon or Washington state, somewhere already perfectly suited for it)

Please watch this video if you have the time. Its not to long and it contains some amazing info on mushrooms.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XI5frPV58tY


--- End quote ---
Thanks for the link U.

When you get your set up running take us thru it.  I'll be looking forward to it. 

Have you considered doing this for extra cash?  I've read that restaurants will pay for specialty mushrooms, shitake, mitake, etc.

--- End quote ---

That thought has crossed my mind. I am trying to setup a small shed with the necessary stuff. Climate control is a must here. It is my intention to grow enough if I can to trade at the farmers market. I have grown relatively small amounts for my family and friends. I have recently moved and so I havent started any yet. When I do Ill definitely be posting about it. I found this on my property today.

I think its a Montagnea but I am not sure.

DeltaEchoVictor:
I don't what that one is either U.

I use The National Audubon Society's Field Guide to North American Mushrooms for identification.

It's a constant companion when I'm in the woods.  It's an excellent resource & you should consider picking it up if you have a penchant for wild fungi.  It's very thorough & tells you what's edible & what's not.  It has excellent pictures as well that are cross referenced with an information page that runs down all relevant info about the various fungi.  Not to mention it's the perfect size for dropping in a haversack or possibles bag so it doesn't take up much room. ;)

Amazon has it HERE

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