Survivalism & Self Sufficiency Topics > Medical Needs and First Aid

DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST

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Orionblade:
Awesome listing.

Quick question - Any more info on alternate therapies for tick bites would be appreciated, since this was several years ago that I was treated, but I'm allergic to Doxycycline! (o noez!)

I found out the hard way. Woke up unable to move after a tick bite, nurse practitioner prescribed doxy, woke up the next morning feeling 100% better, but had bumps everywhere. IIRC, the alternate treatment was penicillin for something ridiculous like 6 or 8 weeks, but again, it was a couple years ago, and not the most pleasant few weeks of recovering from epithelial bumpies (did I mention they were everywhere?)

Thanks!!!!


+1x10^10


kiteflyer:
  Thanks Doc! One thing a nurse recommended was a hot water bottle with an edema attachment for dehydration when too ill to drink. A salt solution if I remember right right up the &*^$% and the colon will absorb the solution and save your life.

          kiteflyer

Doc K:

--- Quote from: kiteflyer on March 19, 2010, 08:49:49 PM ---  Thanks Doc! One thing a nurse recommended was a hot water bottle with an edema attachment for dehydration when too ill to drink. A salt solution if I remember right right up the &*^$% and the colon will absorb the solution and save your life.

          kiteflyer

--- End quote ---

Yep!  Transrectal rehydration.  If you don't have the ability (or knowledge) to give an IV, you can give an enema (without purging) to rehydrate.  There was an article on this last year in Wilderness and Environmental Medicine.  I'll see if I can find it...

Schmidt:

--- Quote from: Doc K on March 19, 2010, 06:41:50 PM ---
OVER THE COUNTER

...

Ibuprofen (Motrin)
Pain, Fever
400 mg - 800 mg PO every 4-8 hrs (max 3,200 mg in 24 hrs)

...

PRESCRIPTION

...

Naproxen (Naprosyn)
Pain
500 mg PO initially, then 250 mg every 6-8 hrs (max 1250 mg per 24 hrs)

...


--- End quote ---


Thanks for writing this out.

I have a few of medicine related questions:

I have seen both ibuprofen and naproxen sold both over the counter and with prescription. I assumed it had something to do with health insurance paying for the prescription and not the over the counter. But Claritin used to be prescription but is now over the counter and not available as a prescription. So why is ibuprofen and naproxen sold with prescription if Claritin isn't?

Second, I was prescribed codeine after a wisdom tooth extraction, took as recommended, and it didn't abate the pain at all. Also, a time when I was having my arm sew shut a nurse told me I could have double the max dosage recommended on the over the counter ibuprofen bottle. I am roughly twice the size of a normal person. Can I double the amount of most medications? Is that dangerous or ineffectual? Of if self medicating start at the recommended and increase till it's effective.

Rorschach:
Some of the medications in the list can be purchase generically for $4 for a treatment quantity or for a months worth at Wal-mart (http://i.walmart.com/i/if/hmp/fusion/genericdruglist.pdf).  For instance in antibiotics are penicillin, amoxicillin, cephalexin (Keflex), ciprofloxin, doxycyline, erythromycin, metronidzole(Flagyl), SMZ-TMP(Bactrim), and Tetracycline.  Some of the medicines, such as the antibiotics are listed in both pills and liquids, so they can be dosed for kids also.  If you are going to get an extra prescription in liquid they are often powder that is reconstituted.  If you would like to store them long term, except tetracycline, when you get to the pharmacy you will need to ask them not to mix it for you.  Having a Sanford Antibiotic Guide (www.sanfordguide.com/) and a Portable book or electronic dosing resource (http://www.tarascon.com/products/) would be helpful for your BOB.

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