Author Topic: Amateur blacksmith's counselling  (Read 20392 times)

Offline Greekman

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Re: Amateur blacksmith's counselling
« Reply #30 on: November 26, 2013, 11:33:53 PM »
Ok...most current designs are the cheap chinese imports and many of the Talabot pattern



Up till 1974 Greece had a king of German origin. So there was a alot of ifluence
This pic is a blacksmith made one in the mid 1900s (my buddy that took the picture has also a German imported one of the same era)



And this is what the guys at the blade forum dug up
http://www.greekblades.com/viewtopic.php?f=38&t=1987

The second guy or anyone else cannot trace his old axe. Any chance you know what it is?
« Last Edit: November 26, 2013, 11:47:27 PM by GreekMan »

Offline Knecht

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Re: Amateur blacksmith's counselling
« Reply #31 on: November 27, 2013, 12:11:45 AM »
Thanks. Those look pretty much like other european axes of recent centuries, including our local ones. That guy at the linked site did nice job cleaning the old axe, did he mention what chemicals he used? There are many recipes and I know some, but always curious about new ones.

Offline Greekman

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Re: Amateur blacksmith's counselling
« Reply #32 on: November 27, 2013, 02:00:54 AM »
he used a tablespoon of baking soda (in lack of washing soda) for evey 4 litres of water....

any luck with this axe?
http://www.greekblades.com/post24017.html#p24017

Offline Knecht

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Re: Amateur blacksmith's counselling
« Reply #33 on: November 27, 2013, 02:24:28 AM »
Thanks! I may try soda next time.
(the link seems to be the same you sent before, isn't it?)

Offline Knecht

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Re: Amateur blacksmith's counselling
« Reply #34 on: January 04, 2014, 04:28:09 PM »
my latest product - my first attempt on damascus. While I don't see much point in making it with all the quality steels available in modern days, it's still being one of those things every blacksmith wants to try someday. So, I made a 10 piece packet of steel strips and tried to forge it into a core rod for a 9th century knife blade, planned to have the core damascus rod, with a steel edge and soft spine rods welded on it...ended up with 640 layers, but I saw there are some cracks in the structure, so it wasn't worth continuing with the blade. But still, it seemed like a big waste to throw all the work away, so I decoded to make it into something useful that would serve me and remind me of the first attempt to this old technology. I cut a part that seemed ok and forged it into awl spike. I sew leather quite a lot, so this tool has years on service ahead.


Offline archer

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Re: Amateur blacksmith's counselling
« Reply #35 on: January 05, 2014, 07:43:29 PM »
wow nice job. very nice job. if you learn and end up with a tool, you've done good.

Offline Knecht

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Re: Amateur blacksmith's counselling
« Reply #36 on: January 06, 2014, 05:18:58 AM »
Thanks. I'll try some more one day, but I still have many far more important smith skills to master yet. Want to focus on axesmitting this year.

Offline Cedar

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Re: Amateur blacksmith's counselling
« Reply #37 on: January 06, 2014, 09:36:45 AM »
Is that 640 folds?

Cedar

Offline Knecht

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Re: Amateur blacksmith's counselling
« Reply #38 on: January 06, 2014, 10:34:47 AM »
yes, it's 10 overlayed 6 times

Offline vivificus

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Re: Amateur blacksmith's counselling
« Reply #39 on: July 23, 2014, 10:49:46 AM »
Knecht,

I saw these instructions. (http://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-Build-a-Forge-Gas/#step) Would this work pretty well for a beginner, it looks like it could be done for less than $100.

Also regarding the the pastecine, is it just as soft as clay? Or are you able to hammer it with some strength. I'm wondering if a tough, but malleable plastic may be a good material to practice your hammering on, it should deform a bit, but not sure if it will hold together for long.

Thanks for your input.

Offline Knecht

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Re: Amateur blacksmith's counselling
« Reply #40 on: August 05, 2014, 02:07:31 AM »
Really can't say much about the forge, I've never used gas forges, just coal. But generally, whatever allows you to bring the steel to the needed temperature is fine.
As for the plasticine, it's about as soft as potter's clay. No force needed to hammer it. Just use a small hammer and light strikes and you'll see. But it's totally unnecessary to use it, if you have equipment and enough time and material to work with steel from the beginning. Plasticine is good when you don't have immediate access to the forge, you're thinking of some technique or product and wonder if it could be made the way you think. That's when you pull out a piece of it and try to hammer it on your kitchen table...