Author Topic: Help picking knife kit  (Read 3431 times)

Offline antiwraith

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Help picking knife kit
« on: July 22, 2012, 10:35:19 AM »
I'm about to join the TSP MSB, and as such I'll get a discount at knife kits.com.  Just so happens I need a new pocket knife.   ;)

I have never made a knife, kit or otherwise.  Can anyone point me to a good folding knife kit for a beginner?  I'm leaning towards the FLX25.  Is there a better option to get started with?  This would be carried in my front pocket as a general use knife.  Thanks!

Offline Josh the Aspie

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Re: Help picking knife kit
« Reply #1 on: July 24, 2012, 10:12:55 AM »
I've been looking over the knife kits there due to discounts as well.

Do you know what the legal limits on length and carry are in your location?

What locking style do you prefer?

Offline antiwraith

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Re: Help picking knife kit
« Reply #2 on: July 24, 2012, 07:21:43 PM »
To be honest I don't know about the legal limit is as far as length of the blade.  I was thinking something small just because I want it in my front pocket.....

As for the lock style, I don't know at all.  What different types are there?

Offline antiwraith

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Re: Help picking knife kit
« Reply #3 on: July 24, 2012, 07:59:37 PM »
I guess it would be better to say I has assumed it would get a folder that locks back.  A lock blade type perhaps?

Also, can I edit my previous posts?  Or am I stuck replying to the thread in a new post?  Maybe I can, maybe it just doesn't work from an iPad??

Offline Josh the Aspie

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Re: Help picking knife kit
« Reply #4 on: July 26, 2012, 12:02:51 PM »
There's a limited time in which you can edit your posts in order to fix typos you notice after, or formatting errors, or the like.  But I'm pretty sure that after an hour or so, you can't edit any more without admin permissions.  I started noticing that recently myself.



There are a few main styles of locks for folding knife.

None: What it says on the tin.  It just doesn't lock.  This is fairly common with Swiss Army Knives (SAKs) and their derivatives.

Liner Lock: The liner is the part of the knife that lays to either side of the blade it's self, and sometimes is an integrated piece with the grip, though sometimes grips are added onseparately.  In a liner lock some portion of the liner is tension-loaded to slip into the center-channel of the knife once the blade is unfolded.  It then rests behind a tab/shelf on the knife, in order to hold the knife blade in place.  You need to reach into the internal portion of the handle and press this tab to the side in order to un-lock the knife.  An example from knifekits can be found here.

This style is one of the simplest, and easiest to construct, but also requires some dexterity to close well, and some people are nervous about the possibility of the blade slicing their fingers due to the fact that you need to start to shut the knife while holding the tab in, and as such your fingers will be in the path of the blade as it starts to fold.  As long as you keep control of the blade, though, it should be safe.  Another complaint about liner locks is that some of the cheeper liner lock blades don't lock the blade open well, which is a danger when it is in use.

Spine Lock: In this case, when the blade is unfolded, the blade is held in place by the spine of the handle sliding in behind the spine of the blade, and into a knotch there, where a tab on the spine interlocks with a tab on the axis around which the blade rotates, thus preventing the blade from moving.  The tab on the spine is kept depressed there by a spring.  You over-come this by pressing on a spot on the spine, where there is a divot to either side in the handle.  This raises the spine-tab out of the blade-notch, and allows the blade to fold.
An example from knifekits can be found here.

This style of lock removes the need to place your fingers in the way of the folding knife, but for most users still requires two hands to operate.  It also introduces a few additional moving parts, but is still relatively simple to set up.

Button Lock:  In this particular style of lock, the blade is kept locked by a rod that passes through a knotch in the area that the blade rotates around, and which is manipulated by a button.  When the button is not depressed, the rod is wide enough to lock the blade in place.  When the button is depressed, the rod is narrow enough for the blade to rotate, and the knotch to slip out from around the rod, thus allowing the blade to rotate.  An example from knifekits can be found here.  It may be a bit big for your use though.

This style of blade is fairly intuitive to use.  It is usually the easiest to open or close with one-handed operation, and in many cases the knife is designed to lock closed, as well as locking open, thus leaving an even lower than usual possibility of the knife opening in your pocket and injuring you when you go to reach for it.  This locking style has more moving parts than most, but I have been told that the specific part above is relatively easy for anyone with an engineering mind-set, or physical technical skills.  This is my personally preferred lock-style for use.



I personally intend to get the knife I linked to in the button lock style.  The one down-side, as far as I'm concerned, is that the blade is above the allowed legal limit length-wide for carrying concealed in my area.  As a result, I will need to shorten the blade with a rasp.  I am currently practicing on tools where the edge is less critical, like my shovels that already came dull.

As far as shirt-pocket-carry, some areas actually have such asinine and restrictive laws that carrying a 2.25 inch blade in your breast pocket is considered to be carrying a concealed and deadly weapon without a permit, and can land you a felony charge.  I strongly suggest contacting your local police and/or sherif's offices, or possibly contacting the public defender's office.  You might also be able to find the laws online from a non-profit knifes rights group.  Once you know what the upper limit is, you can safely stay within it and stay out of trouble, if you so choose.