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What kind of accuracy can I expect out of my airgun?

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Heavy G:
I'm new to airguns.  A friend gave me a Beeman RX1 in .20 with a Theoben gas ram.



It has a nice Bushnell 4x12 scope.  It's heavy and has an adjustable trigger that I have set to about 3 or 4 pounds if I had to guess.

I plan on using it for crows and other vermin.  Plinking too.  Maybe field target competitions.  And some cheap bench rest practice.  I'm not a super dedicated psycho airgun hobbyist.  I'm just a guy with a free gun who wants to get the most out of it that he can.

I've shot it twice.  First time I used Benjamin pellets.  The second time I used Beeman pellets.

I'm sighting it in at 25 yards.  Yes, a little far for an air rifle to be super accurate but for crows I think 25 yards is a good sight in range.

Accuracy so far (just two shootings) has not been what I expected.  Groups of about 1.5 inches with occasional fliers.  (I have been paying attention to seating the pellets flush with the breach and not nicking them with my fingernails; that cut down on the fliers.)  No detectable wind when I shot. 

I've heard stories about good pellet guns having "one hole" groups.  Is that at a couple yards instead of 25? 

My goal is to get the groups down to about 1 inch at 25 yards. 

I have about 8 kinds of Beeman pellets to experiment with.  I expect to find some that are far more accurate than others.  And just shooting it more will get me better with it.

I haven't cleaned the barrel yet.  There's some special stuff to do with airgun cleaning so I'm waiting until I learn more about it before I do it. 

But my question to y'all is: what kind of accuracy can I expect out of a good pellet gun like this?

kiteflyer:

       Break it in a little and read this http://www.reviewcentre.com/review151632.html best of luck with it!

             kiteflyer


      http://www.reviewcentre.com/review151632.html
 



--- Quote from: Heavy G on November 26, 2009, 02:10:45 PM ---I'm new to airguns.  A friend gave me a Beeman RX1 in .20 with a Theoben gas ram.



It has a nice Bushnell 4x12 scope.  It's heavy and has an adjustable trigger that I have set to about 3 or 4 pounds if I had to guess.

I plan on using it for crows and other vermin.  Plinking too.  Maybe field target competitions.  And some cheap bench rest practice.  I'm not a super dedicated psycho airgun hobbyist.  I'm just a guy with a free gun who wants to get the most out of it that he can.

I've shot it twice.  First time I used Benjamin pellets.  The second time I used Beeman pellets.

I'm sighting it in at 25 yards.  Yes, a little far for an air rifle to be super accurate but for crows I think 25 yards is a good sight in range.

Accuracy so far (just two shootings) has not been what I expected.  Groups of about 1.5 inches with occasional fliers.  (I have been paying attention to seating the pellets flush with the breach and not nicking them with my fingernails; that cut down on the fliers.)  No detectable wind when I shot. 

I've heard stories about good pellet guns having "one hole" groups.  Is that at a couple yards instead of 25? 

My goal is to get the groups down to about 1 inch at 25 yards. 

I have about 8 kinds of Beeman pellets to experiment with.  I expect to find some that are far more accurate than others.  And just shooting it more will get me better with it.

I haven't cleaned the barrel yet.  There's some special stuff to do with airgun cleaning so I'm waiting until I learn more about it before I do it. 

But my question to y'all is: what kind of accuracy can I expect out of a good pellet gun like this?

--- End quote ---

Bryan E.:
This is a really nice air rifle.  I have shot one and sighted it in at 30 yards.  I was able to get one inch groups and less and that was my first time to shoot the rifle.  Probably the best pellet is going to be the Beeman FTS.  Also make sure you try the Beeman Kodiak or Kodiak Match.  These might be your best, long range pellet. 

That rifle is capable of 1" group at 50 yards.  I know of guys that have used one to kill crows at 75 yards. 

It will probably shoot best if you hold it loosely, and rest your forearm hand under the front of the stock, right in front of the trigger guard.  Hold the gun slightly loosely and let it recoil.  Don't use a death grip, but even your right hand will be a gentle grip.  You might try a straight right thumb hold instead of wrapping it around the pistol grip.  When shooting from a rest, rest the gun in your left hand and your hand on the sand bag.   

Just start practicing with the gun.  Shoot further and further as you get better and better.  20-25 yards is a good starting distance for practice but I would probably sight in further than this, more like 30 yards. 

There is a good air gun software called Chairgun.  It's a free downloaded software that will help you to plot a trajectory chart for your gun and pellet.  You need to know some basic information but it is really neat and worth your time to look into it.

For more information on your rifle, search try the yellow forum for air gun information. 

Bryan

AC:
You have a good gun there. I'd second the advice to try Kodiak and Kodiak Match. Greater accuracy is generally found at lower velocities, and your gun may be able to push super-light pellets to very high velocities, but a heavier pellet at say 800FPS is very authoratitive.

I've shot a .22 PISTOL that will do a half-inch group at 25 meters out of a 4-inch barrel, your rifle will do a lot better than that.

You have to learn good trigger technique, follow-through, a lot of basic shooting stuff. Airguns are very good for this. Your gun will do fine on crows, they're BIG. Head or neck shots will turn 'em off quick.

Steve Cover:
+1 on the break it in.  All airguns need several hundred rounds through them before they settle in.
 
Airguns are some of most accurate arms in the world because the compression system is the same every time.

However, you have a Magnum hunting airgun, not a precision soft shooting target arm. 

Don't expect one hole accuracy.. (Despite what the Beeman Catalog claims), your air rifle is built for a different purpose.

Beeman supplies great quality, and two of my air rifles are Beeman.  Just don't expect target accuracy from a Magnum.

Also, if you want top accuracy, don't go cheap on the pellets....

However, for breaking in the gun, the cheaper pellets are minute of soda can at reasonable ranges.

Shoot it a lot.  But don't let youself get sloppy.

Trigger press, not jerk when the sights look right, breath control, gripped with the same pressure every time.  etc.

An airgun can do wonders for your shooting technique if you practice properly.

For the heavy boomers like the RX1, I like the heavy Beeman Kodiak pellets for small game. 

They don't shoot as flat as the little potmetal speed demons, but handle cross winds much better and hit very hard.

Properly broken in, you can expect about 1" groups at 25 yards from your rifle if you are up to it.

One tip, check the scope mounting screws often. 

The two way recoil of spring type airguns does strange things to screws.

Take Care

Steve

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